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SidecarFlip

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #315 on: March 03, 2017, 05:45:07 PM »

That is pretty neat to watch.  15 miles on one charge.

Quite a fire in Toledo yesterday.  A Lithium alloy fabricator of some sort.  No water could be used as Lithium reacts with water to form hydrogen gas and the entire area was evacuated for a while due to noxious fumes.

Read this morning that the owner stated they had special fire supression in the plant but it did not function correctly.

I thought it was battery related at first but it wasn't.  The manufacture something lithium related for the glass industry.
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blue2

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #316 on: March 03, 2017, 06:23:55 PM »

And I know the guy that put the fire suppression sys in. Head scratcher right now.
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Tiny

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #317 on: April 07, 2017, 10:03:31 PM »

1 robot will replace six human jobs, Automation is a 'national emergency' and more on the future of work

Published on April 3, 2017 Featured in: Economy, Editor's Picks, Technology

Caroline Fairchild

You probably saw at least one of the many headlines last week about a new report out about the future impact of automation on the U.S. economy. Most stories focused on one stat: For every robot put in place per thousand workers, up to six workers will lost their jobs and wages will go down. I took a look at the 91 pages of research and pulled out some other key findings:

As many as 57% of jobs could be automated over the next two decades, but this stat assumes automation will be cheaper than human labor, encouraging employers to use it.

The U.S lags behind its European peers in the adoption of robots in the workplace: In the late 2000s, there were 2.6 robots per thousand workers across developed European economies and only 1.4 robots in America per one thousand workers.

Men will likely be impacted more than women by mass adoption of robots: They will likely lose more work, however the decreases in wages for men and women will be the same.

The manufacturing industry will be most impacted by exposure to robots and there will be very few employment increases across other occupations to offset this decrease.

Managers are the only occupation title that the researchers said would not be negatively impacted by robots.

Workers with less than a high school degree, a high school degree and some college will see the most negative impact on employment and wages thanks to robots. The only group not hit in the researchers' exercise was workers with post-college degrees.

Robots in America will quadruple by 2025 to 5.25 more robots per thousand workers leading to a nearly 2 percentage points decrease in employment, according to one very aggressive model.

http://www.nber.org/papers/w23285?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin
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Tiny

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #318 on: April 24, 2017, 12:20:47 AM »

When a farmer on a Danish island persuaded conservative locals to "go green," they ended up saving millions of dollars per year in imported fossil fuel energy. Now, the whole world is learning how they did it.

https://www.facebook.com/ChristianScienceMonitor/videos/10155320761344658/

This island's solutions to energy production were covered in a TV series called "Islands of the Future". They get a lot of visitors looking to see how it's done, most look like Japenese or Chinese. Soon they will be way ahead of America in clean energy.
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Professor H

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #319 on: April 27, 2017, 12:10:08 AM »

And I know the guy that put the fire suppression sys in. Head scratcher right now.
It would be interesting to learn what system they used and why it failed -
I teach an advanced suppression system course and we cover this type of specialized systems vs your standard sprinkler systems
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #320 on: April 27, 2017, 02:38:02 PM »

Speaking of technology, I got a new cell phone (and provider) this week and the phone has more intellegence (and memory) than my laptop[ does) plus it's IP54 rated.  Big issue with cell phones is water.  Not my new one.  It can be submerged in 30 feet of water for 3 minutes without damage.  No touch either (other than powering it up).  I speak to it and it handles everything else..... don't talk back like CL does, either. ;D

Always had an I-Phone.  Not now.

Probably take me a year to figure everything out.
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blue2

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #321 on: April 27, 2017, 05:50:35 PM »

Fixing your own supper tonight huh
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CatLady

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #322 on: April 28, 2017, 07:55:17 AM »

 ;D
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #323 on: April 28, 2017, 01:49:21 PM »

;D

No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D
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Tiny

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #324 on: April 28, 2017, 03:58:02 PM »

Speaking of technology, I got a new cell phone (and provider) this week and the phone has more intellegence (and memory) than my laptop[ does) plus it's IP54 rated.  Big issue with cell phones is water.  Not my new one.  It can be submerged in 30 feet of water for 3 minutes without damage.  No touch either (other than powering it up).  I speak to it and it handles everything else..... don't talk back like CL does, either. ;D

Always had an I-Phone.  Not now.

Probably take me a year to figure everything out.

So if you catch a cold and lose your voice does it recognize you?

If you are next to some loud person, TV or Radio will it pick up what they say?  :-\

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The Fuzz

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #325 on: April 29, 2017, 06:11:35 PM »

No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D

I smirked when I saw you post it to begin with......I figured that was going to draw some fire from CL. 
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CatLady

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #326 on: April 29, 2017, 07:11:25 PM »

No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D

YOU are the peanut gallery!   ;) ;D 8*
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #327 on: April 29, 2017, 07:37:51 PM »

It did........ ;D
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Tiny

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #328 on: May 01, 2017, 08:27:48 PM »

A student who worked in a Chinese iPhone factory explains why manufacturing jobs aren't coming back.

It's going to take a lot more than concrete and machines to manufacture iPhones in the U.S.

CNBC recently spoke with Dejian Zeng, a graduate student at NYU's Wagner School of Public Service, who spent last summer working undercover building iPhones at Pegatron, one of Apple's manufacturing partners.

After returning from the trip, which was organized by NYU and China's Labor Watch, Zeng said he's convinced that U.S. workers aren't going to be shuffling into factories to build iPhones any time soon.

How exactly does a student at a prestigious U.S. university end up in China, sitting quietly on a stool, inserting parts into iPhones, one by one?

Zeng walked CNBC through his decision to spend six weeks in a factory working 12 hours shifts Monday through Saturday, mostly during the night, and what he discovered along the way.

"I just showed up"

It turns out getting into an iPhone factory isn't that hard.

"They just gave me the address of the factory and I just went. I just showed up. When I was there I saw people holding luggage waiting in a long line, so I just stood in the line," Zeng told CNBC in an interview.

"When it was my turn they asked for my ID, asked to see my hand and asked me to recite the English alphabet. I got in after that. It took less than 30 seconds. You don't have to apply or have any skills."

Zeng told CNBC he went to the factory because China Labor Watch was expecting a strike, and it wanted boots on the ground in case a strike occurred to understand how it happened.

Zeng said China Labor Watch had done research and had noticed that, while wages weren't terrible, Pegatron's factory was cutting down the subsidies it offered workers on things like food, which ultimately meant workers were getting paid less. As he phrased it, Pegatron was using a bit of a loophole to save money while also meeting wage labor requirements. Zeng also claims he saw several violations, such as mandatory overtime, which he addressed in an open letter to Apple in March.

Why it can't happen here


Now that he's seen how a Chinese iPhone factory operates, Zeng doesn't believe that Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) or other companies will be able to build competitive factories in the U.S., no matter what politicians want them to do.

"The first thing I can think of from a labor perspective is that the wages are unacceptable for American workers. So, in the factories, I was getting paid about 3100 yuan, or $450, per month. I don't think American workers can accept those kind of wages based on living conditions and prices here," Zeng said.

"Even if they relocate factories to the U.S. they'd replace workers with robots," Zeng said. He said Pegatron already uses robots to apply cameras to iPhones, and to drop batteries into the devices. Robots, Zeng said, are more precise than human workers, and precision is particularly important for those two components.

The only reason human labor is still used, he believes, is because it's cheaper in some cases.

"We are using labor in China instead of a machine because labor is cheaper than maintaining machines. If you relocate factories to the States you need to think of how to manage the workers," Zeng explained.


Even China is getting too expensive

Meanwhile, Zeng also said that factories are starting to appear in other countries where human labor costs are even cheaper than in China.

"China is developing. Prices for food and housing are increasing, so you have to increase wages accordingly. The government set minimum wages, and wages are going up, so [the] cost for labor is going up. Other places like Bangladesh, the wages are really low. They're shutting down factories in China and moving to where labor costs are lower. Factories used to be in America, then they moved to China, and now they're moving over to Vietnam and Bangladesh."


If President Trump wants iPhones manufactured in the U.S., Apple will need to front the cost to pay the much higher wages required in the U.S., which means that consumers will have to be willing to pay more. Either that, or it will have to rely a lot more on machines, which won't create jobs, and might end up taking them.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/student-worked-chinese-iphone-factory-131142489.html
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blue2

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #329 on: May 01, 2017, 09:13:50 PM »

So if they pay $450 a month to build phones Apple should have plenty of room to pay more and still make billions selling phones for $800
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