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Categories => Hobbies & Arts => Topic started by: Monique on April 27, 2012, 06:43:28 PM

Title: Gardening
Post by: Monique on April 27, 2012, 06:43:28 PM
Thanks for the great idea for a thread, Skit!  :)


Anyone ever try the 'square foot' gardening method? I just put in my first bed. It's amazing what will fit in a 4'x4' space. I have radishes, carrots, beets, and scallions (16 each), lettuce and spinach, pole beans and 32 peas (four kinds) in there. And two squares are empty! Can't wait to see how it turns out!

Did I mention that I love springtime?? lol
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ShorTea on April 27, 2012, 07:07:03 PM
Wow, what an amazing variety in such a small space, I never would have imagined a full garden in the space you are talking about.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on April 27, 2012, 07:15:31 PM
If it works like the book says, I'll have enough produce to share with everyone!  :D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on April 28, 2012, 05:27:34 AM
Interesting idea for "four square gardening".   I should check that out more.

Nowadays, I do mostly flower gardens with a few tomato plants.  Beans would be a good addition.

Really glad for the new thread topic!! :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on April 28, 2012, 07:38:06 AM
Thanks for the great idea for a thread, Skit!  :)


Anyone ever try the 'square foot' gardening method? I just put in my first bed. It's amazing what will fit in a 4'x4' space. I have radishes, carrots, beets, and scallions (16 each), lettuce and spinach, pole beans and 32 peas (four kinds) in there. And two squares are empty! Can't wait to see how it turns out!

Did I mention that I love springtime?? lol


I remember seeing similar 'gardens' on the roofs of apartment buildings in Europe 40 years ago...  seems this guy has taken that 'concept' and repackaged it...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Lu-7FIj_g&feature=player_embedded# (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Lu-7FIj_g&feature=player_embedded#)!

Lots more videos on the topic:

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=square+foot+gardening&oq=square+foot+gardening&aq=f&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_l=youtube-reduced.3..0l4.18473.33536.0.34152.29.29.4.14.14.0.120.1124.3j8.11.0. (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=square+foot+gardening&oq=square+foot+gardening&aq=f&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_l=youtube-reduced.3..0l4.18473.33536.0.34152.29.29.4.14.14.0.120.1124.3j8.11.0.)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ducksoup on April 28, 2012, 08:27:52 AM
I mostly do flowers.  I have dozens of roses, day lilies, and plant seasonal ones too.  For eating stuff I usually mix in a couple of eggplants in among my flowering plants.  I have a small garden for veggies and usually do a couple of kinds of peppers there.  I used to grow a mater plant but it was taking too much room.  One thing I learned is that if you plant marigolds around your mater plants they will repel mater worms, and it works.  I still have marigolds with my veggies, even if I don’t have maters.


Roses are my biggie.  I struggle with them.  I have good soil, but they were looking scraggly even with good fertilization watering and care.  Turned out grubs were my problem.  Getting that in control, but they are taking time to recover.

I have day lilies all around my roses, and it is nice.  I get lots of color with nice flowers and pretty much no extra care.  Some can be cut and kept inside for a very long time fresh.

I do some herbs.  Those I have in long planter boxes.  I learned that some are best contained, like lemon balm.  Made the mistake of growing that in garden and it is like a monster weed spreading everywhere.  Mint of any kind will do the same. 

I have stevia, which tastes like sugar, and spearmint, which together are great in tea.  I often chew a leaf of both just because.

I have chives, basil, chamomile, stevia, spearmint, and parsley in my planters.  Catnip didn’t work, the cats ate it to the ground.

I have a dark purple lilac that is gorgeous, and honeysuckle, orange and white.  Rose of Sharon is nice too, low maintenance.


My neighbor does the 4x4 thing, but frankly he way overdid it, tried to do watermelons, cucumbers, and mush melons in a 4x4.  Well, his is a 3x5, but...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on April 28, 2012, 08:56:18 AM
From duck soup:  "I do some herbs.  Those I have in long planter boxes.  I learned that some are best contained, like lemon balm.  Made the mistake of growing that in garden and it is like a monster weed spreading everywhere.  Mint of any kind will do the same.   :o "

I had both lemon balm and mint.   Took me weeks to completely clear it (and occasionally see a new sprout).   Spurge will do the same, but I love it---low and bushy, yellow tops right now, turns rusty in fall.   MUST keep confined or it will fill fields.  Morning glories are very difficult to remove permanently.

We have pink peonies, tangerine-colored poppies, various hostas, gigantic Rose of Sharon's in a row (I keep cutting them back and they seem to get taller every year  :o ), and several other perennials.   Usually fill in with marigolds wherever extra color is needed.   

Happy digging!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on April 28, 2012, 05:41:11 PM
I love marigolds. They're just so cheery! I bought some plants last year at Parran's and they went crazy in my pots. I saved a lot of seeds, and they've self sown in their pots, too. I'm planning to put marigolds in all of my raised beds, and of course let the volunteers do their thing as well.

I also love morning glory vines. I know they're weedy, but they're also very beautiful and provide cover to ugly fences. I'm going to plant many of them along our chain link fence and add moonflowers and maybe some honeysuckle, too.

I did some zinnias last year, but I was disappointed with them. I liked how different each flower was, but they seemed sickly. Maybe I did something wrong. This year I'm going to focus on sunflowers because they're spectacular and they produce their seeds which are a really healthy snack for kids. And birds. I'm sure I'll put in some petunias and maybe some geraniums. I enjoy old fashioned flowers.

Herbs will be pretty new for me this year, too. I've read that basil is a good companion for tomatoes, and there's nothing better than a lovely caprese salad for a summertime lunch. Definitely going to try stevia and peppermint to add to iced tea!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ducksoup on May 09, 2012, 12:15:11 AM
I think I got stevia from Parran's last year.

OMG the weeds....   They are going crazy.  I can't win! 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on May 09, 2012, 02:43:33 PM
Just finished marking off and tying the square feet in one of my big beds. OMG, I have 28 squares to fill, and there's another just like it! I was going to tie that one, too, but it started to really rain--and of course now that I came inside, it's sunny! I'm hoping the twine grid will discourage my kitty from using the beds as her litterbox. Yuck.

I'll be glad when I finally get all my plants in the ground. I have starts all over the place, inside, outside, even next door! lol
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: naomi43 on May 09, 2012, 02:54:41 PM
I went out Parrans in Ida last week, got lots of flowers. Excellent price for flats 8.99!
My patio is very full now. Yesterday there store was open on m50, stopped by they have
great hanging baskets going back to get those :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: marilyn.monroe on May 09, 2012, 05:04:26 PM
Lovely topic! I am enjoying getting back to gardening too! :) Got violets everywhere, they are so pretty like a carpet.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on May 15, 2012, 08:40:17 AM
My garden is finally starting to take shape. Got my purple hull peas and baby limas planted yesterday, along with sweet corn, patty pan squash, and speckled pole beans together. I've never done the 'three sisters' method before, so that'll be fun to see how it turns out.

Today I'm planting edamame (soybeans) and getting my tomato, pepper, and cucumber starts in the ground. The Kentucky beans and sugar peas I planted a few weeks ago are really taking off now.

I saw an enormous groundhog casually saunter through my yard a few days ago... sure hope he doesn't decide to eat all my tender little green things!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on May 15, 2012, 10:53:30 AM
from Monique:  I saw an enormous groundhog casually saunter through my yard a few days ago... sure hope he doesn't decide to eat all my tender little green things!"

I have to contend with the rabbits eating my small plants.   Got everything planted now.   Did Big-Boy tomatoes, beans, and hot peppers yesterday.    What fun it was to get down and dirty!!  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Billy on May 29, 2012, 12:09:03 PM
Quote
One thing I learned is that if you plant marigolds around your mater plants they will repel mater worms, and it works.



Thanks for this Duck. I do small tomatoes (Cherries, Sweet 100, and Jellybeans) in buckets. I have tremendous results, that is until last year when they were destroyed by horn tail tomato worms. Funny thing was my larger plants went untouched in my garden, the difference marigolds. I didn't connect the two until reading your post. I was just out in the rain shower adding a single marigold to each bucket hopefully this does the trick.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on May 29, 2012, 01:01:06 PM
Thanks for the tip of putting marigolds around the tomatoes.  Last year  I had the ugliest HUGE tomato bug I've ever seen.  Going out to do this "trick" now!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Forsythia on May 30, 2012, 01:44:58 PM
Got mine planted Sunday.  I did green beans, zucchini, bell peppers, a couple varieties pf tomatoes, habenero amd thai Dragon peppers, and baby sweet watermelon.  I have sandy soil so the tomatoes are usually amazing.  I'm curious as to how the watermelons will be.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on May 30, 2012, 03:19:58 PM
I'm sunburned, sore, and covered with smudges. Guess what I've been doing!  8)

Planted hostas today in what I thought was my shady side yard. I must really ignore that side of the house because I was surprised to be in full sun the whole time I was digging those holes! I finally got around to cleaning up the bed by the dog run, too. I pulled out the useless ground cloth that had weeds and grass happily growing on top and turned the earth. Now that's ready to be replanted with something fun and interesting. Also dug up some of those damn stinging nettles. I hate those things! What a way to spoil a barefoot stroll through the garden.

The only downside of gardening is that my housework really piles up. I think there are extra people living here that I don't know about. Who uses all these towels?!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Billy on May 31, 2012, 06:19:29 AM
Sounds like we should start an MT co-op. Last year I had way more vegetables than we could consume. If you walked past my house you normally would end up with a bag of tomatoes in your hand. I've scaled way back this year but when I read about everything other members are growing it makes me think I should have grown more for bartering purposes.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: FritzTheKat on May 31, 2012, 06:39:14 AM
We're growing tomatillos for the first time.
So far, so good. Cool looking plant... 8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on May 31, 2012, 05:01:32 PM
We're growing tomatillos for the first time.
So far, so good. Cool looking plant... 8)
Neat! I meant to get some tomatillo seeds but they got edged out by all the other stuff, lol. Handsome was interested in growing and using those. Maybe I'll try them next year.

Sounds like we should start an MT co-op. Last year I had way more vegetables than we could consume. If you walked past my house you normally would end up with a bag of tomatoes in your hand. I've scaled way back this year but when I read about everything other members are growing it makes me think I should have grown more for bartering purposes.
You probably walk past my house fairly often! I'll trade you a bag of my tomatoes for a bag of yours! lol
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: FritzTheKat on June 01, 2012, 06:39:29 AM
I can't wait to make "homegrown" Salsa Verde.
We are growing some heirloom tomatoes as well. I love to try something new...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Mike Ingels on June 01, 2012, 07:27:32 AM
Loving the rain. We have green, red and banana pepper, zucchini, okra, tomatoes, peas, Asian cabbage, leek and cucumbers. Lots of flowers, too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on June 01, 2012, 08:53:04 AM
I can't wait to make "homegrown" Salsa Verde.
We are growing some heirloom tomatoes as well. I love to try something new...
Yep, that's exactly what H wanted them for. We decided to try making it with Ciolino's tomatillos first and get the recipe down before we grow our own.

I've probably already mentioned that I'm growing three different types of brown tomatoes this year: brandywine, black krim, and black cherry. I'm really hoping some of them are as good as the Kumato, whose seeds are restricted to licensed growers.

Loving the rain. We have green, red and banana pepper, zucchini, okra, tomatoes, peas, Asian cabbage, leek and cucumbers. Lots of flowers, too.
Sounds like a lovely garden. Someone at school today mentioned that her garden always tastes better when we have plenty of rain rather than when it's watered from the hose. I think that's true, too. I just wish I would've gone ahead and mowed the backyard a couple days ago when I had the chance! It's gonna be a jungle out there!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on June 01, 2012, 10:04:09 AM
Found a very large selection of heirloom tomatoes at The Andersons.  They are gone now.  It's nice to see the good stuff coming back instead of ill tasting big boys and better boys.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: inarut on July 04, 2012, 09:37:39 AM
I have a big issue with fungus in my last rose bush. I have treated it over a dozen times and still have it. Anyone got any suggestions?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on July 12, 2012, 01:43:31 PM
Just found the topic - enjoy catching up and any tips.

This is my first foray into flower gardening - and I've gotten a hodge podge of varieties by strolling through Parrans this spring - as well as Lowe's on my occasional visits there.

I'm moving towards Perennials for the major centerpieces as I have quite a few locations in the yard.   Some sun, some shade and most a mix.

I'm taking notes on which flowers do better in the heat/sun, and shade so when I revisit them next year it will be with a better plan.   (I also need to write down the names - as I'm terrible in that regard as a beginner)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on July 12, 2012, 02:08:58 PM
Welcome aboard the amateur gardeners spree, Prof!   I may not be good at it, but it is my favorite summer pastime.  I change things around every year, to hubby's dismay ;D

I should be picking my first tomatoes in a few days :). 

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on July 12, 2012, 03:08:12 PM
Tried the Upside down tomatoes last year - no luck only had one or two.
Gave up on them.
My grapes are looking to be small this year... but always tasty from a 100y/o vine.
Lots of Zucchini so far - (lots of watering), and the flowers seem to be reaching their summer peaks,
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on July 12, 2012, 04:18:59 PM
Prof, you have hidden gardening talents!    Sounds like you did quite nicely, despite the heat we just had.   Good for you!

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on July 22, 2012, 12:37:00 PM
My garden is ginormous! I have towering corn, sunflowers, and caged cucumbers. There are tons of peppers of various hotness, purple hull peas, and even some tiny eggplants. I still haven't had a ripe tomato yet, but they're on their way.

Note to self: Next year put in an irrigation system! I'm tired of watering every day!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: tnweasel on July 22, 2012, 12:54:06 PM
glad your garden is doing so well.....ours just never materialized this year....my flowers are rocking but our veggies and a bust......thank goodness we have a friend with a big, beautiful garden and she is already supplying us with cukes and zukes!!!! can't wait for the tomatoes......
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on August 05, 2012, 09:43:08 PM
I've been kicking myself for not keeping those little cards that tell you what flowers are what...   Does anyone have a good picture reference website for flowers?

My petunia's have been in full bloom all season - so they are heat resistant.

I'm also learning about deadheading certain flowers and cutting others.  I'm hoping some of the heads with their seeds will start my ditch bank blooming in the next year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on August 05, 2012, 09:54:03 PM
I've been kicking myself for not keeping those little cards that tell you what flowers are what...   Does anyone have a good picture reference website for flowers?

My petunia's have been in full bloom all season - so they are heat resistant.

I'm also learning about deadheading certain flowers and cutting others.  I'm hoping some of the heads with their seeds will start my ditch bank blooming in the next year.
Watch out for those beautiful flowers that are actually weeds. they will definitely be back next year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on August 05, 2012, 10:25:20 PM
Watch out for those beautiful flowers that are actually weeds. they will definitely be back next year.

I already have several of those that if you "train" they are fine...

I found a good site for pictures and now I'm trying to ID some of the ones I have around my yard...

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/plant-dictionary/ (http://www.bhg.com/gardening/plant-dictionary/)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on August 05, 2012, 10:48:38 PM
Nice reference page for finding plants.  Thanks Prof
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on August 10, 2012, 11:59:13 AM
I'm bummed that my brandywine tomatoes are splitting and mealy. I was really looking forward to enjoying them. They're huge and full of pulp, and the taste is good, but they're really not edible. My corn didn't fill out, and out of all the many different beans and peas I planted, I didn't even get enough to make one meal.  :(

I know it's been a challenging year weatherwise, but I also blame the crappy topsoil I bought from Jack's earlier this spring. I told them I wanted garden soil (half topsoil/half compost), but what we got was two pickup truckloads of clay filled with rocks and glass. Now I suspect there was also chemical toxins in the dirt, because some of my beds--which were heavily amended with compost, manure, and peat--have stunted plants that have failed to produce. It's probably the stuff they scraped off of the soil at the Consolidated demolition site. Never again for Jack's. I'll go back to buying the bagged stuff for $1.50/bag. Much better quality!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: ducksoup on August 10, 2012, 02:18:56 PM
This has been an odd year Monique.  I would not jump to believing it is the dirt, although it can be.  Even with watering my plants are smaller than normal, both veggies and flowers.  My pepper yield has been low, even with a lot of watering.  My planter box impatiens are half normal size.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Skittelroo on August 10, 2012, 02:30:16 PM
I have to agree with duck soup here.  Our ground is good black soil and in past years I have had plenty of tomatoes and beans from just a few plants.  Not so this year----just a few of each :(. Tomatoes had a lot of hard pulp this time, and beans and hot-peppers only enough for one meal.  Many flowers didn't bloom for long or were leggier than usual.  Hose-water just doesn't do the trick of occasional rains.  We even lost a lot of myrtle, which has survived all kinds of past summers.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on August 10, 2012, 02:42:18 PM
Yep, I've thought the same thing about watering with chlorinated water. Plants really don't seem to like it much. Next year I'm gonna get rain barrels, although if it's as dry as it was this year, that won't help much. Maybe get a few Brita pitchers just for the garden? lol

Hmmm.... Just thinking out loud here, but I wonder if I added the same dechlorinator drops I use for my fish tank to water for the garden if it would make a difference...? Still, a lot of tedious watering by hand.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on August 10, 2012, 02:48:31 PM
Yep, I've thought the same thing about watering with chlorinated water. Plants really don't seem to like it much. Next year I'm gonna get rain barrels, although if it's as dry as it was this year, that won't help much. Maybe get a few Brita pitchers just for the garden? lol
We have a well, and are having much the same results as I'm seeing here. there's no substitute for rain!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on August 10, 2012, 04:50:36 PM
I'm glad (? that doesn't seem right!) to hear that others are having the same issues I am. Maybe there aren't any toxins in the soil. But it really was clay, rocks, and broken glass. Unless someone is just looking for fill dirt, they'd be better off getting their topsoil elsewhere.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 19, 2013, 04:49:02 PM
Thinking about getting started with my earliest garden plants. ExHubby is starting his hot peppers again, which I'll finish in the garden, so I'll probably focus on tomatoes. I'm still fascinated with brown varieties. The Black Krim was my favorite last year.

ExHub uses potting soil and plastic drink cups to start his plants. They turned out very healthy and with great germination. I'm thinking of using my AeroGarden starter tray again. The plants were surprisingly vigorous last year, but the refill plugs for the tray are way too pricey. I'm thinking of trying to use cotton wool as the substrate instead.

Anyone else starting their garden already?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on February 19, 2013, 05:21:58 PM
I'm only thinking about it...I saved some red and yellow bell seeds from a couple of peppers that were really large.  Larger than a softball.  I am going to try to start them.  I'll try the potting soil and drink cups.  Maybe styroform since I have a bunch of them.
I buy tomatoe plants at the Andersons.  They have a good variety early in the season.  A lot of the old hybrid.
I wasn't going to start the peppers until the end of Mar or early Apr.  Is that to late?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on February 19, 2013, 05:46:14 PM
I have been debating on how early to plant some seeds for some flowers and herbs. 
I wanted to share the moment with my granddaughter,
as we plant water and watch them grow inside before planting them outside.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on February 19, 2013, 05:49:09 PM
Greenhouses will be starting  to seed about now, so it's probably not too soon to start.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on February 20, 2013, 12:52:18 PM
article in the blade today in the Peach on tomatoes.
I totally agree with one reader that the best are Early Girl and Brandywine.  A number of people like Rutgers too.  They are great in this part of the country.   I aways bought Early Girl to have 68 day tomatoes but find out they last all summer and taste as good as any.
I learned about Marglobe tomato too from friends and an expert at The Andersons.  It's is an old heirloom variety with natural disease resistance that is an ancestor of many hybrid varieties. It's kind of like the Rutgers but maybe more disease resistant.  I have only found them at The Andersons on Monroe St and Talmadge.
Last year they had either a 6 or 8 pack of different kinds of hybrid tomatoes.  Have to get them early though or they are gone.e  Gives you a way of experimenting.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 20, 2013, 04:21:31 PM
According to my little "When To Plant" app I downloaded from Mother Earth News, I'm a little ahead to actually start tomatoes and peppers from seed. They say mid March, but it's still a good time to decide on and order seeds.

I'd really, REALLY like to grow my own Kumatos. Anyone ever have them? They're brown tomatoes, and so sweet and delicious. Apparently they are 'designer' tomatoes, and we are prohibited from growing them from their seeds. Only licensed commercial growers are allowed. Hmph. Wonder how bendable that rule is?? lol

I'm growing lettuces, bok choy, and herbs in my AeroGardens right now. The basil is going gangbusters! My little one is growing pink (of course) petunias in her ladybug style AG. What a fun way to get a jump on the season and get a gardening fix in the dead of winter.

I might have to make a trip down to The Andersons to check out their starts. Seems like another old timey MT'er used to recommend them, too. (I thought I read they were closing, tho??)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on February 20, 2013, 05:50:40 PM
According to my little "When To Plant" app I downloaded from Mother Earth News, I'm a little ahead to actually start tomatoes and peppers from seed. They say mid March, but it's still a good time to decide on and order seeds.

I'd really, REALLY like to grow my own Kumatos. Anyone ever have them? They're brown tomatoes, and so sweet and delicious. Apparently they are 'designer' tomatoes, and we are prohibited from growing them from their seeds. Only licensed commercial growers are allowed. Hmph. Wonder how bendable that rule is?? lol

I'm growing lettuces, bok choy, and herbs in my AeroGardens right now. The basil is going gangbusters! My little one is growing pink (of course) petunias in her ladybug style AG. What a fun way to get a jump on the season and get a gardening fix in the dead of winter.

I might have to make a trip down to The Andersons to check out their starts. Seems like another old timey MT'er used to recommend them, too. (I thought I read they were closing, tho??)
Watch for the supreme court ruling on the farmers planting seeds they grow...  you may be able to grow those designer tomatoes.   

I'm going to wait a week or so then start my seeds.

I have cilantro as one of my herbs, and was told it spreads easily if planted in the ground.   Anyone with that experience?  If so I may keep it in a pot.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on February 20, 2013, 06:18:47 PM
Cilantro will only spread if it goes to seed. I have never had any luck with cilantro, and will probably rely on Kroger for my supply, since their growers seem to have better luck than I do.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 20, 2013, 06:42:38 PM
I haven't had much luck with cilantro, either, and it's one of the main herbs we use. Handsome wants me to try again, but seems like whatever I do, it bolts and before I know it, it's bitter and useless (or coriander, whichever you prefer). I had it in a pot against the privacy fence last year. This year I might try it in a different location. After that, I'll take sammy's tack and just buy it at the grocery.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: eriemermaid on February 20, 2013, 08:30:54 PM
Planting by the Moon
May the Force be with you while sowing seeds, mowing the lawn, pruning roses, composting, watering and more!

By Marion Owen (http://www.plantea.com/marion.htm), Fearless Weeder for PlanTea, Inc. (http://www.plantea.com/index.htm) and
Co-author of Chicken Soup for the Gardener's Soul
[size=-2][/size] FEATURE ARTICLE:
(http://www.plantea.com/traffic-jam.gif) (http://www.plantea.com/Tom-Hanks.htm)Tom Hanks' "Power of Four" solution (http://www.plantea.com/Tom-Hanks.htm)More good stuff:
Marion's online catalog
Who is Marion Owen?

FAQs about PlanTea

Search Marion's articles, tips and recipes

Why grow organic?

News and press releases

Read love letters

How to link to this site

Need a speaker?

How to contact Marion

Visiting Alaska?
Come to Kodiak Island!

Go to home page
(http://www.plantea.com/beet-dancing-sm.gif)
Marion's UpBeet Gardener
Newsletter[/b]
has been
replaced by Marion's blog
which you can find at:
www.marionowen.wordpress.com
[/font][/size]
[/t][/t][/t]
   

What if I told you that mowing your lawn on certain days would mean you could mow less often?
Before you roll your eyes, think about it. The moon influences more than the ocean tides. Just ask any bartender, clergyman or nurse. In fact, my friend Amy braces herself before going to work. Amy works at the hospital and when the moon is full, those nights in the emergency room are, as she calls it, "memorable."
Many scientists insist that the myth that a full moon affects the behavior of humans, animals and plants is a bunch of baloney. But police, bartenders and folks like Amy will tell you otherwise.
Before I go further, let me tease you with a possibility: What if mowing your lawn during certain phases of the moon retarded growth which meant you didn't have to mow as often? Keep reading. I bet you won't be shaking your head much longer!
According to a National Geographic (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/) news article more gardeners today are turning to the moon for sage advice on the best time to plant, prune, weed, and harvest. The practice, known as moon or lunar gardening, centers on the moon's gravitational effect on the flow of moisture in soil and plants.
Gardening by the moon is as old as time. Long before man (and women!) ever had a watch on his wrist or a calendar on the refrigerator, everything was governed by the phases of the moon.
May the Force be with you!
Moon gardening has been passed down through many generations. "There are firm believers in moon gardening today who will not plant anything unless a favorable moon sign is indicated," says Ed Hume, one of the Pacific Northwest's favorite garden gurus and proponent of the moon's influences on gardening. Hume publishes an annual Garden Almanac which gives month by month moon sign gardening calendar -- you can buy your own Almanac (http://www.plantea.com/question.htm) through my online catalog.
The moon controls ocean tides, influences the groundwater tables beneath our feet and the movement of fluids in plants. Even continental land masses are said to rise 2 to 3 feet in elevation with the passage of the moon. Understanding the effects, and timing your gardening chores accordingly, is the basis of moon gardening.
Ed Hume's Garden Almanac serves as a handy reference guide for the best dates for sowing seeds (http://www.plantea.com/seedstart.htm), pruning, tending houseplants, transplanting, and fertilizing. Dates are included for watering, composting (http://www.plantea.com/compost.htm), harvesting, and even when to mow the lawn to retard growth! There is a wealth of information in the Garden Almanac. It's like knowing "the Force is with you!" [/t][/t][/t]
For example, the best time to turn over garden soil is during the last quarter of the moon (decreasing moon phase) because that's when the water table has dropped to its lowest point. This means there is less moisture in the soil. Taking your back into consideration, it is easier to turn soil over when there is less moisture in it!
How to garden by moon phases
The moon moves through a complete cycle every 29 days. For moon gardening purposes, this cycle is divided into four quarters or phases. The term phase refers to the moon's apparent shape as viewed from earth during the month. To plant by the moon phases you will need an almanac or calendar, such as Ed Hume's Planting Guide, that lists the exact time and date of the moon phases.
(http://www.plantea.com/moon-phases-gardening.gif)
The lunar month starts with the new moon, also called "the dark of the moon. From the new moon to the first quarter and from the first quarter to the full moon, the moon appears to grow from nothing to a crescent and then to a full circle at mid-month. These are the increasing or waxing phases.
Increasing Light -- New moon to full moon
Examples of garden chores to do by the light of the moon:
(NOTE: These are general guidelines. I highly recommend referring to Ed Hume's Planting Guide for specific planting tasks):
  The decreasing or waning phases are when the moon "shrinks" from the full moon down to the new moon (darkness). As the moon wanes during the 3rd and 4th quarters, this is a good time to prune plants, as the water table is diminishing and so less sap will flow out of the cut ends. The plants are said to orient themselves toward their roots, making this a favorable time for planting, transplanting and harvesting root crops in general. The 4th quarter is the most dormant period and is good for chores like weeding.
Decreasing Light -- Full moon to dark of the moon
Examples of garden chores to do by the dark of the moon:
(NOTE: These are general guidelines. I highly recommend referring to Ed Hume's Planting Guide for specific planting tasks).
  How is sowing, transplanting and harvesting linked to phases of the moon? One theory is that during the light (waxing) of the Moon, sap is thought to flow more strongly, filling plants with vitality and energy, favoring the planting and harvesting of crops that mature above ground.
What the moon gardening movement currently lacks is a body of modern scientific work that validates its benefits...
Science or baloney?
John Teasdale, director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Systems Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, said he is not aware of any research on the lunar influences on agriculture, though he said an experiment could be established.
"We know that the moon influences some natural phenomena such as tides," he said. "I would guess that a simple hypothesis would be that lunar cycles could influence meteorological cycles which in turn could influence crops."
RJ Harris, the head gardener at a private estate near Cornwall, England conducts his own experiments. Each year he cultivates a selection of crops in opposition to the best practices of moon-gardening methods. Crops planted according to the lunar cycle fare much better, he said.
(http://www.plantea.com/potato.gif)
"I've got a large area in potatoes. We've got some planted at the right time of the moon and some crops at the wrong time of the moon. The difference is so obvious and there for everybody to see," he said.
Names of full moons
[/font]January: Wolf
February: Snow, Quickening, Storm
March: Worm, Sap, Chaste
April: Seed, Pink, Grass, Sprouting, Wind
May: Flower, Corn Planting, Hare
June: Strong, Rose, Sun, Strawberry
July: Mead, Thunder, Buck
August: Sturgeon, Wort, Corn
September: Barley, Harvest
October: Hunter's, Blood
November: Mourning, Beaver
December: Cold, Oak, Long Night's
Now it's your turn. Test the validity of gardening by the moon in your own garden. Plant some crops by the correct moon sign and others by the wrong moon sign. Experiment with above ground and below ground crops. Try mowing different parts of your lawn according to the moon phases! Send me you results, either by email or, better yet, send my a photograph. I'll send you a set of my photo note cards and a free box of PlanTea organic fertilizer (http://www.plantea.com/plantea-organic-fertilizer.htm).
 
For the present let the moon shine brightly and the breezes of the spring blow gently, dying away from the gale of the day, and let the earth, who brings increase, bring peace. --E.M. Forster [/t][/t][/t]
 

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Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on February 20, 2013, 10:04:39 PM
The Anderson's in Toledo on Monroe st in the Westfield mall area is alive and well.  Actually expanding the items they carry in the store.  Outside garden shop too.  I'll post when they get their stuff in.  I really liked the idea of buying a 8 pack of mixed hybrid tomatoes. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on February 21, 2013, 09:15:56 AM
I found some pre-packaged (seeds on tape) varieties that are supposed to make your pots fill with a variety of flowers. 

I'll see how they work for my back porch pot this spring.

Monique - does bolt mean turn to seed?   
Asparagus is only good early - is it similar to that?

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 22, 2013, 08:33:23 AM
I found some pre-packaged (seeds on tape) varieties that are supposed to make your pots fill with a variety of flowers. 

I'll see how they work for my back porch pot this spring.

Monique - does bolt mean turn to seed?   
Asparagus is only good early - is it similar to that?
Yes, bolting is when they shoot up and start flowering and turn bitter.

Not really similar to asparagus, I don't think. With cilantro, you just have to stay on top of pinching it back at the growing tip so it can't bolt. I always seem to get distracted with other things, and next thing I know, it's blooming. If you can keep it under control, cilantro can produce all season. Funny that its close cousin, parsley, is much slower to bolt.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on February 22, 2013, 08:40:34 PM
I'd really, REALLY like to grow my own Kumatos. Anyone ever have them?

Not that I recall......there have been a few of those specialty/new tomatoes I have liked, and a few I haven't.  The sweet part sounds like something I would like.

Where and when do you get them?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 22, 2013, 08:53:40 PM
Handsome usually gets them at Meijer, but they're by the avocados, not by the regular tomatoes. They are in a long package, with about six to a pack. They're smallish tomatoes. Especially in wintertime, they're the closest thing to a summer tomato I've ever tasted. Great in fresh salsa and pico de gallo, too.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on February 22, 2013, 08:59:37 PM
Thanks,,,,,are they available this time of year?

They also sound like they would cook down well in a crock pot for spaghetti sauce.  You ever cook any down?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 22, 2013, 09:27:58 PM
Yep, I have a fresh pack in the kitchen right now! So yummy with either Michigan cottage cheese or fresh mozzarella and basil.

I've never cooked them down, so I have no idea, but you give me an idea for a pasta dish I usually only make in the summer (pasta, EVOO, garlic, tomato, basil, fresh parm, and pignolas).

My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I think I might have a tomato fetish!!  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on February 24, 2013, 04:18:12 PM
Was never aware of this until I saw this published in the Blade today.  Have to be on the lookout next year.

http://www.toledoblade.com/Gardening/2013/02/24/9th-annual-Seed-Swap-in-Toledo-nourishes-solid-crop-of-gardeners.html (http://www.toledoblade.com/Gardening/2013/02/24/9th-annual-Seed-Swap-in-Toledo-nourishes-solid-crop-of-gardeners.html)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on February 24, 2013, 04:54:21 PM
Yep, I have a fresh pack in the kitchen right now! So yummy with either Michigan cottage cheese or fresh mozzarella and basil.

I've never cooked them down, so I have no idea, but you give me an idea for a pasta dish I usually only make in the summer (pasta, EVOO, garlic, tomato, basil, fresh parm, and pignolas).

My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I think I might have a tomato fetish!!  ;D

You ever try to grow any in your garden?

LOL, mouth watering and fetish......I think I will refrain from jumping on that one.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 24, 2013, 05:13:23 PM
You ever try to grow any in your garden?

That's illegal!! I'll never tell.......


...... Actually, no. I haven't. But I might! ;0)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on February 24, 2013, 06:59:14 PM
They do kind of look like something illegal as small plants.  lol

I'm going to trust your good tastes and get some fresh ones to cook down in a spaghetti sauce to see how they do.  The sweet taste is what kind of interests me.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on February 24, 2013, 07:09:09 PM
They do kind of look like something illegal as small plants.  lol

I'm going to trust your good tastes and get some fresh ones to cook down in a spaghetti sauce to see how they do.  The sweet taste is what kind of interests me.
I was just talking to H about this. I really don't think Kumatos are sauce tomatoes. I'd stick with Romas or beefier tomatoes for that. These are salad, sandwich, and just eating tomatoes, IMO. Try them raw first. Like an heirloom.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on February 24, 2013, 07:14:04 PM
Gotcha!

Maybe I can discuss this in more detail with H the next time we meet in the produce section.   ;D

Romas are my preference for cooking tomatoes.....perfect for spaghetti sauce, but I'm always interested in experimenting. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 01, 2013, 10:16:28 AM
I haven't grown potatoes before, and I keep seeing easy methods posted on facebook, such as in 5 gallon buckets and large trash bags. Thinking of trying one of those methods this year, and maybe try growing ginger, too. You can start it with what you get from the grocery. We tend to use lots of ginger in stir fry, Thai, and Indian dishes. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 10:34:04 AM
I'd do them in buckets if I were you, they take up a lot of garden space.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 01, 2013, 10:43:12 AM
Home grown potatoes are nice but like The Fuzz says they take space and lots of attention..  Have to hill them up or they get green.  If you have never had them before it doesn't matter, the potato bugs will come from somewhere.
There are local potato farmers where you can buy 100 bags for next to nothing.  At least one on Samaria Rd
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 01, 2013, 10:50:53 AM
Yeah, I could buy everything from farmer's markets (and I do buy a lot), but gardening is one of my passions. I just love growing stuff. I have plants all over my house, and spring fills me with joy and anticipation of playing in the dirt. So I don't mind the trouble, and I like to learn new techniques.

I bombed out on corn last year, and I don't think I'll try that again. That *was* a lot of work and water for absolutely nothing edible. Speaking of that, maybe one of you knows if a streetlight shining all night on a garden will affect the plants? I suspect that's the problem with one of my beds. It is never fully dark. It's one of those "yellow" lights, very bright.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 01, 2013, 11:53:33 AM
Yeah, I like to grow stuff too.  Until the guy sold the property i had a 125' by 75' garden behind my lot.  That was almost work instead of fun..
Don't give up on the corn.  I've heard from others that last year was the worst year ever for growing sweet corn.
I've found you need many short rows instead of longer ones to get the pollination.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 12:18:21 PM
Yeah, I could buy everything from farmer's markets (and I do buy a lot), but gardening is one of my passions. I just love growing stuff. I have plants all over my house, and spring fills me with joy and anticipation of playing in the dirt. So I don't mind the trouble, and I like to learn new techniques.

You SURELY realize that there is about 3 or 4 really good comments I could come up with out of those three sentences.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 01:09:32 PM
Corn requires good full direct sunlight too.  I'm not certain about the streetlight impact though.  I seem to recall a real hot parking spot in high school where there was a cornfield and a street light.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 01, 2013, 04:14:52 PM
Fuzz, you're getting off track..
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 04:28:59 PM
Damn, and I so seldom do that.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 01, 2013, 04:35:20 PM
You SURELY realize that there is about 3 or 4 really good comments I could come up with out of those three sentences.
;D After I hit Post, I saw the 'low hanging fruit' and wondered what you'd come up with. ;0)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 05:33:46 PM
Yeah, I could buy everything from farmer's markets (and I do buy a lot), but gardening is one of my passions. I just love growing stuff. I have plants all over my house, and spring fills me with joy and anticipation of playing in the dirt. So I don't mind the trouble, and I like to learn new techniques.


OK!

1 - Do you have any other passions that fill you with joy and anticipation
2 - Do you lay a blanket over the dirt, or just go right at it without one
3 - Learning new techniques......I best not expand on that any further
4 - Don't mind trouble, aye

Just 4 quick ones came to mind.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on March 01, 2013, 05:44:36 PM
Corn requires good full direct sunlight too.  I'm not certain about the streetlight impact though.  I seem to recall a real hot parking spot in high school where there was a cornfield and a street light.

If I remember right you were probably pretty spiritual in your gardening back then...

spent all night plowing and planting and all day the next day praying for crop failure :o :o :o ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 01, 2013, 07:39:19 PM
LOL, had those sewn seeds the prison population of Southern Illinois would have been overcrowded by this point in time.  That was some pretty over fertilized soil with a lot of different chemicals during harvest season.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 02, 2013, 10:24:31 AM
Well I sat with my Granddaughter and we planted 72 little pots in one of those pre-packaged seed things from Burpee...

It will be interesting to see if/what develops, from my mix of spices, flowers and ornamental grass...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 02, 2013, 03:23:50 PM
If I remember right you were probably pretty spiritual in your gardening back then...

spent all night plowing and planting and all day the next day praying for crop failure :o :o :o ;) ;) ;)
LOL, had those sewn seeds the prison population of Southern Illinois would have been overcrowded by this point in time.  That was some pretty over fertilized soil with a lot of different chemicals during harvest season.
This cracked me up. You boys....  ;D ;D ;D

Well I sat with my Granddaughter and we planted 72 little pots in one of those pre-packaged seed things from Burpee...

It will be interesting to see if/what develops, from my mix of spices, flowers and ornamental grass...
Such a fun thing to do with a kid! My parents had a vegetable garden when I was a kid, and I remember eating carrots straight out of the dirt and wiped on a shirttail and sweet peas off the vine with my dad. Hope you instill a love of gardening in your granddaughter. :)

Went to Lowe's and got some seed starting soil and potting soil. Looked at their seeds, but Burpee is expensive, especially when I start thinking that I can buy a flat of healthy seedlings for less than ten bucks at Parran's in a couple of months. Plus they had zero interesting tomato seeds. Came home with just cilantro seeds to see if it will grow in the AeroGarden.

I'll pot up the plastic 4- and 6-cell packs and flats I saved from last season with a mix of the potting soil and fluffy starter soil and plant the leftover tomato seeds from last year. Handsome has been on a kick of buying croissants for a few weeks, and I've been saving the clear plastic lids--they're perfect for a little 'greenhouse.' How Martha is that?! lol
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 02, 2013, 03:35:29 PM
Sorry, hard to imagine Martha as a Moaner.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 02, 2013, 10:21:54 PM
We did the Cilantro as well, that's when I learned those were called
Coriander -   Cilantro is the Spanish name of the same...

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 08, 2013, 11:53:50 AM
Well a few sprouts have started - and a few that must take longer, 
will be interesting to see how they develop the next few weeks
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 08, 2013, 12:13:29 PM
Yea, a few of mine are as well.  They look like such healthy little "tomato" plants, can hardly wait to see them bud out.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 08, 2013, 02:06:36 PM
Funny you guys posted. I *just* finished planting my tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and a few others in the recycled flat I mentioned. The croissant domes fit pretty well and should cover all the seedlings to make a nice greenhouse for several weeks.

Sunny day + playing in dirt =  :)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 08, 2013, 02:16:21 PM
Looks like Handsome is in for a fine, long night.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on March 09, 2013, 06:51:26 AM
Funny you guys posted. I *just* finished planting my tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, and a few others in the recycled flat I mentioned. The croissant domes fit pretty well and should cover all the seedlings to make a nice greenhouse for several weeks.

Sunny day + playing in dirt =  :)


Related article:  http://www.mlive.com/weather/index.ssf/2013/03/with_memorial_day_about_three.html#incart_m-rpt-2 (http://www.mlive.com/weather/index.ssf/2013/03/with_memorial_day_about_three.html#incart_m-rpt-2)

(http://media.mlive.com/weather_impact/photo/12392157-large.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 09, 2013, 08:39:47 AM
I have two rows - one a flower and one ornamental grass that didn't germinate yet - may have to replant those with something else otherwise it appears I will have flowers and spices to replant in a few weeks. 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 09, 2013, 10:17:58 PM
Sometimes the seeds need a lot of heat to germinate. I'd wait a couple of weeks before replanting, and place the flat near a heat vent.

I am overrun with Genovese, lemon, and globe basil!!! The AeroGarden is an herb monster!! lol

Helloooo, pesto....

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 10, 2013, 09:59:15 AM
I did read on the packet that some do take up to 20 days to germinate...  I guess I have to pay closer attention and plant similar germination times closer to each other...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 23, 2013, 10:03:42 AM
So now I just need the weather outside to cooperate as I have a few plants that are getting out of proportion of their little pot and need to be moved - preferably outside!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on March 23, 2013, 10:31:50 AM
So now I just need the weather outside to cooperate as I have a few plants that are getting out of proportion of their little pot and need to be moved - preferably outside!

Not to be a down prof but I just got a tweet that we can expect a winter storm watch west of I75 for Sunday night and Monday morning >:( >:( >:(
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 24, 2013, 11:44:16 AM
I heard the same - looks like a transplant indoors will be needed first.   Next year I'll rethink this process.   but the granddaughter is enjoying it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 24, 2013, 11:52:34 AM
Unless you're growing peas, you shouldn't be worried about planting outside until mid May. Besides, it's fun to have an indoor garden. Mine makes me smile every day. :0)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 24, 2013, 01:02:02 PM
Mine makes me smile everyday too......and makes my eyes red.   ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 27, 2013, 05:53:32 PM
Another article in the Blade today, peach section i think it was on starting seeds.  I was ready to put some pepper seeds in a cup and learned that I should wrap the whole container in plastic wrap until the seed bursts out.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 27, 2013, 06:01:19 PM
Peppers need warmth to germinate. Put them in front of a heat vent.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 27, 2013, 06:32:09 PM
I was going to put them on my glassed in back porch which faces south but sounds like I better bring them in at night.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 28, 2013, 08:51:33 PM
Boulder couple involved in topless-gardening fight investigated over threat to president
Robert and Catharine Pierce questioned by Secret Service in Ohio

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_22885737/boulder-couple-involved-topless-gardening-fight-investigated-over (http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_22885737/boulder-couple-involved-topless-gardening-fight-investigated-over)

The U.S. Secret Service investigated a report over the weekend that a Boulder couple -- including a woman involved in a topless-gardening dispute three years ago -- made threats against President Barack Obama while eating in an Ohio restaurant.

Police in Marblehead, Ohio, detained Robert Dale Pierce and Catharine Marie Pierce on Saturday after receiving a call that Robert Pierce had said he was going to "kill Obama and take him down," according to a police report.

A disassembled rifle and ammunition were found in the Pierces' car, according to police.

Catharine Pierce is known in Boulder for gardening topless outside her home in the 800 block of Cherry Avenue. Boulder Housing Partners, which owns the home, threatened


Boulder police occasionally have received complaints about Catharine Pierce's activity, but say she is not breaking any laws.

However, there are signs of a new eviction attempt. A court summons was taped to the door of the Pierces' home Wednesday after Boulder Housing Partners on March 20 filed a "forcible entry and detainer" case against the couple in Boulder County Court. Such cases generally are filed by the owners of a property when a tenant refuses to leave.

The Ohio police report said the Secret Service was contacted and that the Pierces were detained so that they could be interviewed by agents. A spokesperson for the Secret Service could not be reached Wednesday afternoon and the current status of the case is unclear.

The police report said dispatchers received a call from Avery's Restaurant regarding a man and a woman who were behaving in an "unstable" way and who said they were going to Washington, D.C., to "set some things straight."

According to the police report, several staff members at the restaurant said Catharine Pierce had grown up in Marblehead.

The Pierces gave police permission to search their vehicle, which they said was a rental from Colorado, the report said. According to the police report, the Pierces had a disassembled 0.22-caliber rifle in the trunk. It did not have a trigger, but was loaded with a hollow-point round in the chamber. Police also found 0.22- and 0.38-caliber ammunition and several bottles of Oxycodone, a painkiller prescribed to Catharine Pierce.

According to the report, a small container with suspected marijuana seeds was found in Robert Pierce's pocket.

Robert Pierce told officers that he is the illegitimate son of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and, according to the police report, he had documents in the car that appeared to support that claim.

Robert and Catharine Pierce could not be reached Wednesday

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on March 30, 2013, 08:47:49 AM
I have a flower that popped up  - a white crocus I'm told...  Spring must be here officially now.   
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: NewDawn on March 30, 2013, 07:01:05 PM
Purple ,white and yellow crocus have been blooming in my yard for several days now. Different kinds of tulips are showing 4-6 inches too. Can't wait till they bloom...it has been a long winter.

Does anyone have an idea on how to rid a family of skunks from under a shed?? They have dug a hole a couple of feet under the shed and if you get close they start hissing and spraying. Any ideas???
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on March 30, 2013, 07:05:17 PM
I don't know what the eat but if you found something maybe you could poison it and throw it in the hole.
I'd hate to throw a smoke bomb in and catch the shed on fire.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: superspice_10 on March 30, 2013, 07:29:59 PM
I've heard playing a radio REALY loud it will get ride of raccoons . Apparently they don't like it cause it hurts they're ears  and they tend to leave the area. Don't know if it works for skunks but it might be worth a try. Good luck .
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on March 30, 2013, 08:04:14 PM
I don't know what the eat but if you found something maybe you could poison it and throw it in the hole.

And then dig stinking skunk carcasses out? Ewwww!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on March 31, 2013, 03:49:24 PM
Wow, I was about to lend some advice about getting rid of a skank until I read it again.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 01, 2013, 09:01:58 AM
Apparently my neighbors (rabbits) enjoyed all my peppers and tomato plants as well as a few marigolds I used for row markers of other items...

I will try again with a larger plant , and maybe research if there is a flower that keeps them at bay...

My zuchinni green and yellow as well as cabbage and a few beans have managed to survive.  I have a cucumber and Eggplant as well on one end.

I'm looking at a small 6 x 6 plot  to see if it's worth it - and to show my grandchildren where some things come from...
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 02, 2013, 08:33:11 AM
We planted a garden again this year after skipping for a few years...  my wife is now able to get out and take care of it better so we'll try it again...  we downsized it to about half of what we used to plant but it's still a pretty good sized garden for the two of us.  I ran the tiller through it yesterday after all the rain while the big red dog sat and patiently watched me do all the work ;) ;) ;)

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/Garden_zps79f57276.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/Garden_zps79f57276.jpg.html)

Even in the years we didn't garden my wife has always kept some herbs tucked into one of her big flower gardens...   the chives are in full bloom 8) 8) 8)  The maple tree helicopters are 'everywhere' around here :( :( :(

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/IMG_20130531_161531_171_zps7e708166.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/IMG_20130531_161531_171_zps7e708166.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 02, 2013, 09:34:58 AM
I was looking for a video of someone using a Troybilt rear tine tiller like mine and found this one...

I have a pair of radio earmuffs like those but I don't get quite as much 'body motion' going when I'm working in the garden...  she does look like she's enjoying herself though 8) 8) 8)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPmdzm-h3Ok

And this looks like her 'mama' trying to till the garden ;D ;D ;D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_CMWMqNZMk

Our tiller is  an early 80s like this one but I've never got around to repainting it.  Works just fine the way it is...  starts the 2nd pull every time too.  Kohler cast iron 7hp engine...  they just don't make 'em like that any more ;) ;) ;)

For all the work he put into painting he should have put a few minutes into adjusting his engagement lever...   he's having to hold it down all the time so it  makes his tilling kind of awkward looking.  When I put mine in low low gear I literally just walk along beside it and just kind of keep it balanced while it does the work ;) ;) ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ryl_IBTVTtI
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on June 02, 2013, 11:47:35 AM
Nice looking soil you have there.  I too downsized from years ago to something managable now.  it's 25ft sq.  After a couple of lawn mowings I have enough grass to cover the garden.  Then i keep piling on.   It's nice that it keeps the soil moist and especially nice walking thru that i don't get dirt all over my shoes.

I wish I would have listened to Monique about starting my pepper plants earlier than Apr.  They all spouted but are really small yet.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 02, 2013, 10:32:09 PM
I used to plant little gardens in various outdoor spots but thieves started getting them just about harvest time.  I just grow indoors and out on my patio nowadays.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 03, 2013, 07:14:54 AM
Nice looking soil you have there.  I too downsized from years ago to something managable now.  it's 25ft sq.  After a couple of lawn mowings I have enough grass to cover the garden.  Then i keep piling on.   It's nice that it keeps the soil moist and especially nice walking thru that i don't get dirt all over my shoes.

I wish I would have listened to Monique about starting my pepper plants earlier than Apr.  They all spouted but are really small yet.

That garden is on a bit of a 'rise' in the ground...   what you can see in the picture probably goes up 30" or so in 60 feet...   when we first started the garden there (the year after we moved here) that was almost yellow sand right up at the top and by the time you got to the bottom of the garden 'hill' it was almost clay.  No matter what your seeds/plants/flowers called for...  it was there!  Over the years I've spent a lot of time pulling the sand down the hill and pulling the clay up the hill and just kept working it together.  We originally had a very heavy front tine tiller...   I'd run it for an hour and it would run me for 3 hours.  And of course we've tilled in just about everything we could find for compost over the years.

We had let it go to lawn over the last maybe 5 years so I wasn't sure how it would till up but we just had to till it several times and rake up a lot of dead grass that came to the top.  We've saved all that and will compost it with last fall's leaves and eventually return it to the garden. 

We have a well and the garden is real close to it so we've never worried about keeping enough water in the soil...  just like over last week worry about it getting 'too wet' ;) ;) ;)

I did see that we have a few blossoms on the tomatoes yesterday 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 03, 2013, 08:17:04 AM
I used to plant little gardens in various outdoor spots but ...

The raptor and those other choppers flying around have limited the abilities of some of those various spots I'm sure...  ;)


Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on June 03, 2013, 10:25:18 AM
The last few years my grandkids have have bagged some of the horse manure that i till into the garden.  And I put some in the compost bin also.  That seems to help alot.  I give the closest neighbor some too.  Keeps the complaints down.  LOL
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 03, 2013, 06:58:29 PM
The raptor and those other choppers flying around have limited the abilities of some of those various spots I'm sure...  ;)

That's why I stood with FF on opposition to those damned things.   ;D

Oh well, indoor gardening is satisfying too.....I just liked the great outdoors.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: charcoal11 on June 20, 2013, 06:09:32 PM
I have big boy,roma,cherry,grape and wine tomato plants and every one has tomatoes on them .Has anyone heard of wine tomatoes ? i have a plant and looked it up and you can actually make wine from them i guess the tomatoes come out purpleish.My spinach plants are ready to pick and zucchini plants are going crazy. Hope all who planted have a great garden  this is my third year.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: eriemermaid on June 20, 2013, 07:07:41 PM
Like :)

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 20, 2013, 10:37:26 PM
My stuff had to survive rabid rabbits... but some is rejuvenating.

My Broccoli and zucchini are going well, as are the cabbage
(Must be a double letter thing)
Peppers, and tomatoes are behind a little and the green beans are starting to take off.

First garden in a few years and its in a sandy spot where a pool used to be years ago, so that will maybe make a difference as well.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 27, 2013, 03:16:43 PM
Raspberry's are ripening, blueberry's forming on the bush, as well as grapes on the vine...  much better than last year.   4-5 inches of rain in the past week and hot steamy weather also put things into growing overdrive as well....
(including my lawn)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 27, 2013, 07:09:24 PM
Raspberry's are ripening, blueberry's forming on the bush, as well as grapes on the vine...  much better than last year.   4-5 inches of rain in the past week and hot steamy weather also put things into growing overdrive as well....
(including my lawn)

I don't ever remember the grapes looking this good before...

we have Niagara and Concorde both...

they're going to be loaded if everything holds up :) :) :)

I'll try to remember to take a picture of them :o :o :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monroe Native on June 28, 2013, 07:11:07 AM
When does the wine making commence?

Do you use the barefoot method like the monks?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on June 28, 2013, 11:57:22 AM
My stuff had to survive rabid rabbits... but some is rejuvenating.

My Broccoli and zucchini are going well, as are the cabbage
(Must be a double letter thing)
Peppers, and tomatoes are behind a little and the green beans are starting to take off.

First garden in a few years and its in a sandy spot where a pool used to be years ago, so that will maybe make a difference as well.

Get a couple outside cats, that takes care of the rabbit issue and the cats deficate in the garden (large litter box) and it adds fertilizer..... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 28, 2013, 01:10:13 PM
When does the wine making commence?

Do you use the barefoot method like the monks?

The stomping will be late August or September...   just depends on when things get ripe!

I never have done the 'foot stomping' method (we actually crush them with a hand made crusher from a piece of a 2x4) but if I had just the right applicant for the position I s'pose I'd consider it :o :o :o

I took a bunch of pictures one year...  I'll have to see if I can find them...  that was several computers ago though :-\ :-\ :-\
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monroe Native on June 28, 2013, 03:21:42 PM
The stomping will be late August or September...   just depends on when things get ripe!

I never have done the 'foot stomping' method (we actually crush them with a hand made crusher from a piece of a 2x4) but if I had just the right applicant for the position I s'pose I'd consider it :o :o :o

I took a bunch of pictures one year...  I'll have to see if I can find them...  that was several computers ago though :-\ :-\ :-\

Sorry - I'm not Catholic so I don't think I'm qualified for the Monks job..... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 28, 2013, 06:22:14 PM
I'm guessing sandy soiled gardens are weathering the opposite of last years drought much better...

7+ inches in the past week
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monroe Native on June 28, 2013, 07:00:51 PM
Another disaster year for agriculture.... 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 28, 2013, 09:11:51 PM
Sorry - I'm not Catholic so I don't think I'm qualified for the Monks job..... ;D

Actually, it wasn't a monk I had in mind to help :o :o :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 28, 2013, 09:39:40 PM
(http://www.bsideblog.com/images/2008/12/real_housewives_oc_ep_403_22.jpg)

Was this what you had in mind?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 28, 2013, 09:42:45 PM
([url]http://www.bsideblog.com/images/2008/12/real_housewives_oc_ep_403_22.jpg[/url])

Was this what you had in mind?


It is absolutely amazing how some minds run on the same track ;) ;) ;) ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 28, 2013, 10:10:46 PM
Okay you talked me into trying the wine making stuff...

I'm told the tastings can be fun as well  ;D

(http://wineportfolio.com/c/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/iStock_000014792123Small.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 28, 2013, 10:24:56 PM
(http://enjoytherandom.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Drunk_Women.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monroe Native on June 29, 2013, 07:01:12 PM
It is absolutely amazing how some minds run on the same track ;) ;) ;) ;D ;D ;D

Can I come over and supervise?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on June 29, 2013, 09:27:46 PM
Another disaster year for agriculture....

Thats fine, the Fed will bail them out......  aka:  Crop insurance.

Another year foir high priced hay.  With a little luck, I'll fill the barn (it's half full now) with nice hay to sell this winter for a good price.  Fingers crossed.

We round bailed 5.5 acres of timothy just before the monsoon, got 39 4x4's from 5.5 acres and sold them all for 45 bucks each.  Thats better than any row crop profit, hands down.

My clearspan will hold 3500 squares and 100 rounds.  At 6 bucks a square this winter, thats 18 grand before expenses, not counting the rounds.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 30, 2013, 08:19:38 AM
We've survived the drought last year with over 80% yield,
now I'm looking at the potential issues with too much rain,
but so far no real stress issues,   good thing we invested in some good tiling a few years back!

Haven't had animals in a while on our farm - so I've never been involved in bailing or storage...   sounds like it could be a good year.   Do you sell it close by or out of state?
I had a friend who would haul it down south to sell, and never could figure out if it was worth it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 30, 2013, 11:18:24 AM
We took a ride over to Petersburg late yesterday afternoon...   quite a few spots we saw some standing water but a lot more spots we saw where the corn and beans had drowned out in spots.  Then on the way home the skies opened up and we had a monsoon and there was water standing pretty much everywhere!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 30, 2013, 12:41:36 PM
Can I come over and supervise?

No...  absolutely not!!!

There are only 2 girls and Fuzz has a very small barrel for them to do their work in so things are already going to be pretty snug ;) ;) ;)

The Fuzz and I may not be two of the smartest 'old dogs' around but I'm thinking we can figure this one out just fine without any supervision. 

Now...  if you want to bring an ambulance crew and just 'stand by' down at the corner I can see the possibility that one of those two girls may at some point need some medical attention :P :P :P
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 30, 2013, 01:04:43 PM
LMAO!  You guys had to of heard that chuckle that just originated from Southern Illinois all the way up to Monroe!

That's a classic, BRD!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 30, 2013, 01:13:59 PM
LMAO!  You guys had to of heard that chuckle that just originated from Southern Illinois all the way up to Monroe!

That's a classic, BRD!

Just looking out for everyone's 'well being' Fuzz ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on June 30, 2013, 01:49:51 PM
I don't ever remember the grapes looking this good before...

we have Niagara and Concorde both...

they're going to be loaded if everything holds up :) :) :)

I'll try to remember to take a picture of them :o :o :o


It does look like the rain is really making the grapes grow although I've heard that if they soak up too much water too fast they can 'pop' or rip the skin open!

These are the Concords...  they're already 'huge' so I'm more concerned they'll be the ones to bust open!!!

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/Concorde_zps219a0b8e.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/Concorde_zps219a0b8e.jpg.html)

And these are the Niagaras...   a new plant 2 years ago if I recall right...  didn't do a thing the first 2 years but they've finally started to take off!!!

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/IMG_20130629_121428_205_zpsc6fc832c.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/IMG_20130629_121428_205_zpsc6fc832c.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on June 30, 2013, 03:43:56 PM
Ahem,  you don't need a whole crew...

One retired Paramedic should do   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on June 30, 2013, 05:27:16 PM
LOL.....voyeurism is kinda hot I guess!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on June 30, 2013, 11:22:00 PM
We've survived the drought last year with over 80% yield,
now I'm looking at the potential issues with too much rain,
but so far no real stress issues,   good thing we invested in some good tiling a few years back!

Haven't had animals in a while on our farm - so I've never been involved in bailing or storage...   sounds like it could be a good year.   Do you sell it close by or out of state?
I had a friend who would haul it down south to sell, and never could figure out if it was worth it.

Racetrack hay.  Lots of people burned with bad checks.

I sell mine out of the barn and word of mouth.  I have people in Ohio that will buy it all...if I can get it made.  Might be running hay this late fall.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on July 01, 2013, 11:23:14 AM
We've survived the drought last year with over 80% yield,
now I'm looking at the potential issues with too much rain,
but so far no real stress issues,   good thing we invested in some good tiling a few years back!

Haven't had animals in a while on our farm - so I've never been involved in bailing or storage...   sounds like it could be a good year.   Do you sell it close by or out of state?
I had a friend who would haul it down south to sell, and never could figure out if it was worth it.


We have one neighbor that sells a lot of their excess at the auction in Manchester.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manchester-Hay-Auction/378863308849473
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on July 01, 2013, 12:06:28 PM
I don't have a lot of excess since I cut way back on size of garden.  I give stuff to both kids plus 3 neighbors that don't have a garden.  And when I overload them they give to friends.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 01, 2013, 05:11:05 PM

We have one neighbor that sells a lot of their excess at the auction in Manchester.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manchester-Hay-Auction/378863308849473

My philosophy is why pay 10-15% to an auctioneer (and have to haul it there and stack it up) when I can sell it right out of the barn.  Personally, I believe the Archbold hay auction (at Yoder and Frey) has a better selection and distance wise, it's a wash.  The premium fee at Archbold is 5% btw.

There are more than enough local horse people to buy the majority of it and whats left goes to Ohio to more horse people, well, they come here and get it.

I had inquires from as far away as New Mexico for hay this year.  While it's wet here, NM and Arizona are still in drought conditions.   Nothing has changed out there as evidenced by the wildfires.  No moisture.  Had one guy that was wanting to come and load it right out of the field with his own crew on semi trailers and take it back west at $4.50 per bale but the rain put a damper oin that.

The issue now for me and row croppers is getting in to a field without rutting it.  It will take literally weeks for the ground to firm up (if it stopped raining today) and I don't believe it will.

The wheat is turning and lots of it is down from the rain and wind but you can't combine it because it's too wet.

Unless we have a drastic shift in weather patterns over July and August, hay prices will stay high.  Last winter, all the excess in barns got used up and then some so there is no surplus left.  I saw hay prices exceed 12 bucks a bale for small squares last January locally.  Hay prices like that are usually only in Florida for racetrack hay.  I think we will have a repeat or close to it, this winter.

According the the Hay and Forage Grower (magazine), prices will stabilize at $6.00 per small square bale or $190 per ton for rounds through the end of 2013 with some local prices even higher depending on demand and availability.

Keep in mind that hay as a feedstock for horses and cattle is cost prohibitive to transport so loacally grown is locally consumed and over the last decade, farmers have converted hayfields to more profitable crops like e-corn so acres in hay has been on the decline.

Declining acreage with steady to increased demand drives prices up as well.

Myself, I have no issue with the hay prices.  For years we basically gave it away, factoring in machinery cost, fuel and labor it was break even maybe.  Now, it's make some money.  Isn't that what free enterprise is all about?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on July 01, 2013, 06:22:36 PM
My philosophy is why pay 10-15% to an auctioneer (and have to haul it there and stack it up) when I can sell it right out of the barn.  Personally, I believe the Archbold hay auction (at Yoder and Frey) has a better selection and distance wise, it's a wash.  The premium fee at Archbold is 5% btw.

There are more than enough local horse people to buy the majority of it and whats left goes to Ohio to more horse people, well, they come here and get it.

I had inquires from as far away as New Mexico for hay this year.  While it's wet here, NM and Arizona are still in drought conditions.   Nothing has changed out there as evidenced by the wildfires.  No moisture.  Had one guy that was wanting to come and load it right out of the field with his own crew on semi trailers and take it back west at $4.50 per bale but the rain put a damper oin that.

The issue now for me and row croppers is getting in to a field without rutting it.  It will take literally weeks for the ground to firm up (if it stopped raining today) and I don't believe it will.

The wheat is turning and lots of it is down from the rain and wind but you can't combine it because it's too wet.

Unless we have a drastic shift in weather patterns over July and August, hay prices will stay high.  Last winter, all the excess in barns got used up and then some so there is no surplus left.  I saw hay prices exceed 12 bucks a bale for small squares last January locally.  Hay prices like that are usually only in Florida for racetrack hay.  I think we will have a repeat or close to it, this winter.

According the the Hay and Forage Grower (magazine), prices will stabilize at $6.00 per small square bale or $190 per ton for rounds through the end of 2013 with some local prices even higher depending on demand and availability.

Keep in mind that hay as a feedstock for horses and cattle is cost prohibitive to transport so loacally grown is locally consumed and over the last decade, farmers have converted hayfields to more profitable crops like e-corn so acres in hay has been on the decline.

Declining acreage with steady to increased demand drives prices up as well.

Myself, I have no issue with the hay prices.  For years we basically gave it away, factoring in machinery cost, fuel and labor it was break even maybe.  Now, it's make some money.  Isn't that what free enterprise is all about?

I've got a hunch most of what he's taking over there isn't what you'd call 'hay'...

it looks to me like baled grass and weeds :-\ :-\ :-\

He probably doesn't want too many people knowing were he lives :o :o :o
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 02, 2013, 12:46:39 AM
That's funny.  I've learned over the years that most horsey people don't have a clue what good hay even looks like.  Their idea of 'good' hay is a heavy green bale and they pay a lot of money for hay that's well on it's way to molding.

The big myth about horse hay is horse owners think that their plug needs alfalfa hay and that's the farthest thing from what old plug should have.  Idle horses only need good grass hay with a bit of alfalfa or clover, water and a supplement like a mineral/salt block.  Only working horses like race horses or pulling horses or athletic horses like hunter-jumpers or dressage horses need a larger percentage of alfalfa or alfalfa/timothy.  That old plug/ornament horse only needs low protein hay.

My 'deal breaker' when I go to a hay auction is my Delmhorst Digital Moisture Probe.  I set the threshold alarm at 18% RM and walk along and stick bales at random.  In short order I get a crowd following me watching the meter (it reads percentage of moisture digitally) and listening for the alarm.  Of course the sellers don't like me, but I'm not there to be liked.  I'm there buying hay for a customer, one reason I like the Archbold auction, the auctioneer knows me and they know I'll pay a good price for good hay, which I did last year representing my customers that ran low because we basically got one good cut.  The Delmhorst was the best 600 bucks I ever spent.  I even have an attachment that allows me to moisture check windrowed hay in the field, prior to bailing.

Now, if it would just quit raining long enough for me to bring down the 40 rounds I have up the road in a barn, to my barn, weed the garden and mow the lawn, I'd be tickled.  An added plus would be fertilizing the hay fields with urea and foiliar innoculant.

The garden is pretty sad.  It's growing and so are the weeds.  My spuds got a good head start on the weeds but the corn and beans are iffy.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on July 02, 2013, 08:42:26 AM
What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.

Do you have the same dangers of spontaneous combustion with damp hay - that is found with damp straw?

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 02, 2013, 12:07:37 PM
What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.

Do you have the same dangers of spontaneous combustion with damp hay - that is found with damp straw?

Hay ride sounds better.

Absolutely.  I never bale above 12%RM because when you bale, you compact the forage whether it's in rounds, squares or large squares and when compacted (squeezed) it naturally warms up.  Rule of thumb is bales will see a temperature rise to about 120-130 degrees (f) after bailing when the moisture is right at 12% and the RM will climb to 18% or so as they hay 'cures'.

The problem occurs when the forage is too wet (above 12%RM) and it gets bailed.  In the old days, older bailers weren't mechanically capable of bailing hay with a higher RM.  Shear pins broke and bailing stopped.  Not so today.  The newer high capacity bailers can bale at any moisture value so you have to watch the RM all the time.  In fact, some bailers are designed and built to just bale at high RM for silage operations.

Bales with high initial RM (over 12%) can heat up to ignition temperatures but long before spontaneous igniton occurs, the hay is junk because it's molding.  The mold spores actually generate the heat as they consume the protein in the plant.

Thats why I chuckle at horsey people at hay auctions buying heavy, green bales.  Inside those bales, those microorganisms are busy eating the plant matter, generating heat and remdering the hay worthless.

You never feed  bales from the field immediately.  It needs to 'cure' or stabilize for a couple weeks prior to feeding.

The best way for someone to tell if a bale is good forage or not, is to smell it and heft it.  Pull the flakes apart and stick your nose in.  If it smells good, it's good.  If it smells musty, it's moldy even if you can't see any white dust (mold spores).  If it's heavy in comparison to size, chances are good, it's no good but to be sure do the nose test.  Modern small square bailers (like I own) can make 100 pound plus bales that are compact.  100 pounds is usually considered a heavy wet bale but in my case, the RM is below 12% and the forage is fine.  I make bales like that for contract customers.  Never for public sale.  I run a 36-38" bale in poly with an  average weight of 40-50 pounds.

After all, most people buy by the bale.  I buy by the ton  if at all possible.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 03, 2013, 07:07:19 AM
What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.


I used to call them for what they resulted in......Tail Rides!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 03, 2013, 10:05:53 PM
I used to call them for what they resulted in......Tail Rides!

Pervert.... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on July 04, 2013, 09:12:01 AM
On a hot humid night in August straw doesn't make you itch as much as hay does 8* 8* 8*
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on July 17, 2013, 08:11:08 AM
My tropical rainforest garden seems to really be taking off,  lots of fresh green beans right now...

Clue for next year - leave a little more space in the rows to run the mini rototiller through in both directions  ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on July 17, 2013, 09:41:48 AM
BRD, yes you are right about the straw but barley straw is really itchy as is the barley when one is combining it.  Barley dust is awful.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on July 17, 2013, 12:34:14 PM
BRD, yes you are right about the straw but barley straw is really itchy as is the barley when one is combining it.  Barley dust is awful.

I generally only handle barley in the 'liquid' form blue2...

and that doesn't make me itch ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on July 18, 2013, 09:11:28 AM
Never much thought about it - but I'm glad some do grow barley and Hops...   ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 18, 2013, 04:18:42 PM
I've don't think I have ever seen them grown around here.  Saw a lot in Europe, but I can't recall ever seeing it grown in the states.  Gonna have to research that.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on July 18, 2013, 04:31:26 PM
I've don't think I have ever seen them grown around here.  Saw a lot in Europe, but I can't recall ever seeing it grown in the states.  Gonna have to research that.
Both are grown here. I have hops in my back yard.With the growth of breweries  comes an increasing number of hops growers, at least one here in Michigan. I'm talking commercial growers, not guys like me.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 18, 2013, 08:00:45 PM
How bout down where we are at Sammy?  Maybe I'm just not recognizing them when I see one.....hops should stand out though with the growing guides, right?
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on July 18, 2013, 08:47:05 PM
How bout down where we are at Sammy?  Maybe I'm just not recognizing them when I see one.....hops should stand out though with the growing guides, right?

Not sure you would see them unless you knew what you were looking for. Unless you knew what to look for, I don't think you would recognize my hops plant, even though it is pretty big.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 18, 2013, 09:39:21 PM
I knew what they were when I saw them in Europe, just not here.  Pretty recognizable. 

(http://blog.oregonlive.com/thebeerhere/2007/08/large_Hops.jpg)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: sammy on July 18, 2013, 09:44:49 PM
I knew what they were when I saw them in Europe, just not here.  Pretty recognizable. 

([url]http://blog.oregonlive.com/thebeerhere/2007/08/large_Hops.jpg[/url])

That's the way hops growers do it. Mine is a lot more free-form.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 19, 2013, 07:23:53 AM
That was kind of my point, where is it commercially grown in the US as I would have recognized a field like that versus they way a garden grower would most likely do it.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on July 19, 2013, 07:32:15 AM
This grower has the right idea...

could even venture out and take care of them on a day like yesterday ;) ;) ;)

(http://growhops.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/fenton_mi2.jpg)

Info on growing hops:

http://hops.msu.edu/
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on July 19, 2013, 07:48:28 AM
I saw that when I was looking to see if I could find where they were commercially grown.  Saw some really neat methods like that one, but figured with as much beer that is made in the US that one would see many fields.  I just must not have been in the part of the states at the right time of year to see them. 

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 19, 2013, 08:41:23 AM
My tropical rainforest garden seems to really be taking off,  lots of fresh green beans right now...

Clue for next year - leave a little more space in the rows to run the mini rototiller through in both directions  ;D

Been weeding (by hand and feeding the mosquito's).  The guy down the road has the right idea.  Leave 3 feet between rows and weed with glyphosate (roundup).  He pulls a small sprayer behind his lawn tractor with a box/spray shield attached.  Kills off the weeds without harming the plants.

The hardest thing to weed are spuds because they spread.  I'm pulling weeds constantly.

I have an old but very handy Troy-Bilt tuffy tiller I salvaged from a dumpster about 10 years ago.  Had to replace the original Tecumseh (because it was burning more oil than gas) with a Harbor Freight Predator engine but it's till width is ideal for between rows.  I actually have 3 tillers, the Troy-Bilt for cultivating, an older Sears front tine killer-tiller and a new, this year, Cub Cadet rear tine counter rotating tine tiller with a Honda engine.  The Cub is a dandy tiller.  They have them at TSC (on sale right now).  Chews up everything and tills with one hand.  I think you can get it with electric start even.

A couple sprays with Sevin for spud bugs and a couple sprays with 32 Urea (left in the spray rig from fertilizing hay fields....  hate to waste 'juice'.

I got a late garden in but my beans are just starting to make stringers and the corn (Ambrosia SU) is about ready to start producing ears.  The onions suck (too wet) and the strawberries aren't too happy either.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on October 01, 2013, 08:17:19 AM
This was a great year for my garden! Tons of produce and still going. I'm actually tired of eating tomatoes, and I have some about to go bad on my windowsill. Last summer was so dry, I had to water daily, and my tomatoes and cucumbers had really tough skins. This year I watered one time, and my vegetables were lovely (I was going to comment on my lovely tomatoes, but I didn't want to give Fuzz that opening!). Water from the hose cannot compare to rain. Now, we just need a few more warm weeks, and our hot peppers will finally ripen. It's been too cool for them!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 01, 2013, 08:30:10 AM
What opening did you not want to give me?   ;D

I had my little patio garden again this year and the herbs did fine....enjoyed the hell out of them.  I had 4 tomato plants (cherry and patio) and they were just starting to produce when I left in early August.  My guess is that since my wife doesn't know how to operate a garden hose is that they will be a pretty Fall brown when I get home this weekend.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: FritzTheKat on October 01, 2013, 08:44:12 AM
Yep. The garden was great this year.

Monique, I'm sure your tomatoes are lovely...

make sauce.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on October 01, 2013, 08:44:41 AM
What opening did you not want to give me?   ;D
Amazing. You can do it to anything! You have a gift!!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 01, 2013, 08:49:56 AM
Yep. The garden was great this year.

Monique, I'm sure your tomatoes are lovely...

make sauce.   ;)

Excellent Fritz.....way to jump on board!

Amazing. You can do it to anything! You have a gift!!

A gift that keeps on giving.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on October 01, 2013, 08:55:53 AM
Yep. The garden was great this year.

Monique, I'm sure your tomatoes are lovely...

make sauce.   ;)
I have made so much sauce (and jams, apple butter, and applesauce) that our three freezers are packed full!

Next year we're going to try growing tomatillos. Didn't you grow some? Handsome has developed an addiction to his salsa verde recipe, and when I went out to buy more tomatillos, there were none to be found. He was very disappointed.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: FritzTheKat on October 01, 2013, 08:58:43 AM
Our tomatillos were even better this year.
Lin's making homemade green enchilda sauce again this week. YUM!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on October 01, 2013, 09:11:08 AM
Fritz, you're a lucky guy. Your wife is amazing! Wish I had a tenth of her skills.

I wonder if tomatillos will freeze ok..... (gonna have to get another freezer!)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 01, 2013, 09:16:53 AM
If I were a betting man I'd put 20 down on you have your own unique skill set.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on October 01, 2013, 09:36:11 PM
My grapes are the best thing - outside of green beans...   
I may have to run out and get a squeezer or whatever you call them  :-)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: eriemermaid on October 02, 2013, 07:22:59 AM
Hmmm, why don't you just put the grapes in a barrel, take off your shoes and socks and stomp on 'em? LOL 
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 02, 2013, 08:07:07 AM
My "other" garden produced 2 very nice plants that I will be harvesting this weekend and hang them upside down by their roots to dry out a bit.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on October 03, 2013, 07:56:47 PM
Stopped by Parran's today for mums and pumpkins. Got there early enough to get my favorite colors of mum, red and purple. They're gorgeous! Also picked up some honeycrisp apples--usually very expensive, but a big apple crop this year--for $2.50/qt. I'll be making applesauce tomorrow and fragrancing my neighborhood with cinnamon and nutmeg!
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: blue2 on October 03, 2013, 09:19:03 PM
Saw a comment that someones tomatoes were the best this year.
Can't say that.  They took forever to get ripe and there weren't nearly as many per plant.
They tasted great but just not as many.
I'm still getting them though.
I have one from the Anderson's called a Johnson something or other that is dark red.  Really delicious by itself and  when mixed with others.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 05, 2013, 05:01:13 PM
A 'Johnson' is not a tomato, it's a pickle. ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on October 06, 2013, 09:45:13 AM
Uh, oh  I feel a rash of "Johnson" jokes  :-)

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 06, 2013, 09:56:52 AM
Not from me, that would be distasteful!   ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 06, 2013, 10:42:11 AM
Entierly depends on who has the 'Johnson' in their mouth....... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 06, 2013, 10:44:08 AM
BTW, we have plenty of well aged manure for your gardens if anyone wants some.  I can load anything from plastic bags to a dump truck......
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monroe Native on October 06, 2013, 11:05:02 AM
I get enough manure off this board everyday to last a lifetime.....

 ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 06, 2013, 11:20:47 AM
I have left a few situations over my lifetime that when the smell and taste of manure permeates my clothing that I generally rid myself of them.   ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: eriemermaid on October 06, 2013, 05:18:17 PM
The situation or the clothes?    ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: The Fuzz on October 06, 2013, 05:40:54 PM
In fact, both.   ;)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 06, 2013, 10:58:47 PM
In fact, both.   ;)

Please elaborate..........  Inquiring minds wanto to know.....
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 06, 2013, 11:00:12 PM
I get enough manure off this board everyday to last a lifetime.....

 ;D

You can't grown anything on hot air....... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on November 13, 2013, 03:15:44 PM
Question on potted "Outdoor" planters...

I put some in the basement before the freeze and was curious

I know they go dormant - do they still require water and light and how often if so?

I'm going to try and salvage some of my nicer looking potted plants til spring.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 13, 2013, 04:24:43 PM
Good question.  Cat lady moved her Ivy's inside, much to the cat's enjoyment.... ;D
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Monique on April 11, 2014, 01:45:32 PM
Monique, not to change the subj but were you the one discussing when to start garden plants from seeds last year.  Maybe I'm to late to start peppers this year.
Yes, in the Gardening thread. Pretty late to start peppers, unless you have a heat mat and indoor grow lights. ExHub decided not to do peppers this year, and I don't have anything started myself! Not even tomatoes! I'll be buying all my plants from Parran's, I suppose.
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: BigRedDog on April 11, 2014, 01:51:52 PM
Yes, in the Gardening thread. Pretty late to start peppers, unless you have a heat mat and indoor grow lights. ExHub decided not to do peppers this year, and I don't have anything started myself! Not even tomatoes! I'll be buying all my plants from Parran's, I suppose.

We drove past the 'bowling alley' yesterday and they were busy putting up the greenhouse...

is Front street back open at the RR yet... that may slow down traffic out front of Parran's...

I have most of the garden ready to go...  been running the tiller out there a little bit every night.

My wife is planning on planting some peas tomorrow.  We can always cover them up if we get a deep frost :( :( :(

We have lots of stuff started inside and in the garden window plus we have a 'little friend' that's working on starting some stuff for us too.  She had her seeds sprouting earlier than ours did so I'm impressed 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: Professor H on April 14, 2014, 11:00:28 AM
I was considering tilling up my little spot - but looks like next week now...  after the snow  :o

Title: Re: Gardening
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 14, 2014, 11:20:50 AM
Got plenty of aged manure available, for free, you pick it up, I'll load your wagon, dump truck or whatever.

Just ask BRD..... ;D

Cabbage (for fermenting to kraut of course), peppers, corn and a whole bunch of Brussels Sprouts this year.  I like sprouts because you can cover them with straw and pick all winter long (along with the rabbits....)

I tend to get my plants from Albring's.  Always had good luck there.

I want to get a greenhouse someday (like BRD).