MonroeTalks.com

Categories => Science & Technology => Topic started by: Frenchfry on October 02, 2012, 11:11:04 AM

Title: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 02, 2012, 11:11:04 AM
Redwood Fossil: Canada Diamond Mine Yields 50-Million-Year-Old Specimen

(And no...it's not about the Republican Party) ;D

 A search for diamonds in Canada's far north turned up a rare fossil — a chunk of a redwood sealed in volcanic rock more than 50 million years ago.

A study of the well-preserved specimen, which also contains a sliver of amber, shows that the now-icy region where it was found had a swampier past.

The wood was found a few years ago in a kimberlite pipe, named the Panda pipe, over 1,000 feet (315 meters) below Earth's surface at the Ekati diamond mine, just south of the Arctic Circle in Canada's Northwest Territories, the researchers say. A kimberlite pipe, a type of volcanic pipe, forms when kimberlite magma pushes through deep fractures in the Earth's crust to create a vertical tubelike structure that's wider at the top like a carrot. Kimberlites have the deepest origins of all magmas on Earth and when they cool, they leave behind rocks dense in crystals, sometimes holding diamonds.

More here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/24/redwood-fossil-50-million-canada_n_1906049.html?ncid=webmail2 (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/24/redwood-fossil-50-million-canada_n_1906049.html?ncid=webmail2)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: marilyn.monroe on October 02, 2012, 11:17:18 AM
Redwoods are awesome. Amber fascinates me.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 04, 2012, 12:44:33 AM
The Mystery Of Black Holes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKZCpgumAi0&feature=plcp#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 04, 2012, 12:45:16 AM
What Is Liquid Air And How Is it Used To Store Energy? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VseT7B1QSg8&feature=plcp#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Baggins on October 04, 2012, 09:24:59 AM
Frenchfry, don't clutter this thread with videos from CNN...Use your words if you have something to add... ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 04, 2012, 10:29:52 AM
Frenchfry, don't clutter this thread with videos from CNN...Use your words if you have something to add... ;)
I'll just file your opinion in the same circular file as those from my other detractors.

But it does prove that the right-wingers that often assail you are wrong on many levels.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Baggins on October 04, 2012, 10:44:04 AM
I'll just file your opinion in the same circular file as those from my other detractors.

But it does prove that the right-wingers that often assail you are wrong on many levels.

It's nothing personal...I just don't like being assaulted with mass video loads all in one thread... :-\

I'm NOT a "right-winger" either...!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 04, 2012, 10:56:37 AM
It's nothing personal...I just don't like being assaulted with mass video loads all in one thread... :-\

I'm NOT a "right-winger" either...!
You're wasting your breath complaining about the videos....this isn't your site and therefore don't make the rules.

I have accused you of being a rightie in the past....and the righties have accused you of being a leftie....I guess you're a fence-sitting centrist...perhaps the only true independent on the forum.

The others mouth the words but their opinions are always 100% right-wing talking points.

I cannot say the same for you so I was wrong to label you as a rightie. Sorry.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on October 04, 2012, 02:09:45 PM
Frenchfry, don't clutter this thread with videos from CNN...Use your words if you have something to add... ;)

Now you've done it - there will be a dozen video's before you can blink...

Stay tuned for what others think - and of course the "lecture series"...
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Baggins on October 04, 2012, 05:06:02 PM
You're wasting your breath complaining about the videos....this isn't your site and therefore don't make the rules.

I have accused you of being a rightie in the past....and the righties have accused you of being a leftie....I guess you're a fence-sitting centrist...perhaps the only true independent on the forum.

The others mouth the words but their opinions are always 100% right-wing talking points.

I cannot say the same for you so I was wrong to label you as a rightie. Sorry.


Well, now you're just being an a**hole...
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 05, 2012, 11:19:16 AM

Well, now you're just being an a**hole...
How so?

BTW...I'm pretty sure your complaints about my videos should have been enough to ingratiate yourself with the righties...you didn't need to go with the name-calling on an apology.  8*
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 05, 2012, 02:54:53 PM
NASA Releases Images Of A DYING STAR (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSDV5_td8uA&feature=plcp#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 06, 2012, 01:33:38 AM
The Most Popular Cell Phones ALL Contain Toxic Metals

The Most Popular Cell Phones ALL Contain Toxic Metals (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MUVE6bwQDg&feature=plcp#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 07, 2012, 05:10:52 PM
New Malware Demands Payment To Get Control Of your Computer Back (Easy Fix Found On Youtube) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOb6f9OVavs&feature=plcp#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 11, 2012, 01:16:04 PM
(Reuters) - Forget the diamond as big as the Ritz. This one's bigger than planet Earth.

Orbiting a star that is visible to the naked eye, astronomers have discovered a planet twice the size of our own made largely out of diamond.

The rocky planet, called '55 Cancri e', orbits a sun-like star in the constellation of Cancer and is moving so fast that a year there lasts a mere 18 hours.

Discovered by a U.S.-Franco research team, its radius is twice that of Earth's but it is much more dense with a mass eight times greater. It is also incredibly hot, with temperatures on its surface reaching 3,900 degrees Fahrenheit (1,648 Celsius).

"The surface of this planet is likely covered in graphite and diamond rather than water and granite," said Nikku Madhusudhan, the Yale researcher whose findings are due to be published in the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters.

More here:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/11/us-space-diamond-planet-idUSBRE89A0PU20121011 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/11/us-space-diamond-planet-idUSBRE89A0PU20121011)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 14, 2012, 09:59:58 PM
Researchers Trying To Understand How Bath Salts Work

Researchers Trying To Understand How Bath Salts Work (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WISdPl-e4A&feature=plcp#)
Title: Verizon's New DVR Will Spy On You
Post by: Frenchfry on December 31, 2012, 06:19:58 AM
"Google TV, Microsoft, Comcast, and now Verizon have all submitted patent applications to create televisions and DVRs that will watch you as you watch TV.

Earlier this month, news came out that Verizon applied for a patent to create a DVR sometime in the future that has cameras and microphones that can see and hear what you're doing and saying, while watching TV. Sounds, actions, food choices, and your ethnicity -- all tracked by the DVR -- will influence what you see in your commercial breaks."*

Verizon has patented a DVR that will listen and watch you and respond accordingly. Is this going too far? Why isn't this invasion of privacy getting more attention?

Verizon's New DVR Will Spy On You (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlX4oAnS8nA#ws)
Title: Re: Verizon's New DVR Will Spy On You
Post by: BigRedDog on December 31, 2012, 11:04:46 AM
"Google TV, Microsoft, Comcast, and now Verizon have all submitted patent applications to create televisions and DVRs that will watch you as you watch TV.

Earlier this month, news came out that Verizon applied for a patent to create a DVR sometime in the future that has cameras and microphones that can see and hear what you're doing and saying, while watching TV. Sounds, actions, food choices, and your ethnicity -- all tracked by the DVR -- will influence what you see in your commercial breaks."*

Verizon has patented a DVR that will listen and watch you and respond accordingly. Is this going too far? Why isn't this invasion of privacy getting more attention?


Yes, this is going 'too far' and there won't be one of these in our house ;) ;) ;)

I can figure whose advertisements to ignore without their help :) :) :)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on December 31, 2012, 11:09:53 AM
Oh Wow....that one is news to me.

Wow.....ain't NFW in hell. 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 18, 2013, 11:00:11 PM
Measuring Broadband America - February 2013

This 2013 Measuring Broadband America—February Report contains the most recent results from the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) Measuring Broadband America program. This program, whose first results were published in August 2011, is an ongoing, rigorous, nationwide study of residential broadband performance in the United States. This study, like those conducted before, involves actual performance tests for thousands of subscribers of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) serving well over 80 percent of the residential market. Our initial Measuring Broadband America Report presented the first broad-scale study of actual consumer broadband performance throughout the United States. This effort was followed approximately a year later by a second report, released in July 2012, and now the present report.
http://www.fcc.gov/measuring-broadband-america/2013/February (http://www.fcc.gov/measuring-broadband-america/2013/February)

=====================================

(http://transition.fcc.gov/cgb/measuringbroadbandreport/2013/charts_February/chart3.jpg)
Title: Re: Science & Technology - Chinese Hackers
Post by: Professor H on February 19, 2013, 10:45:13 AM
Fascinating video tracks a real Chinese hacker in action
(Video found in link below)

The American cyber security firm Mandiant, which worked with the New York Times to expose and counter a China-based hacking campaign, has released an extensive report that it says ties years of cyber attacks on U.S. corporations back to the Chinese military.
Mandiant says it can even narrow down the hackers to a specific military unit in the Chinese army, Unit 61398, and a specific location in Shanghai.
As part of its report, Mandiant released a video that purports to show one of the Chinese hackers in the act of attacking real, unsuspecting “English language” targets. The video says it tracks “actual attacker sessions and intrusion activities conducted by one specific Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) group, which Mandiant has named APT1.” In other words, APT1 is their name for the Chinese hackers.
The video, embedded above, moves quickly and is highly technical. It includes comments along the lines of “Here an APT1 actor uses a web C2 head web command and control server” and “now the APT1 actor is verifying that stolen credentials will work on a Microsoft Exchange email server.” Still, it’s hard to miss the big picture: the hacker behind that keyboard is trying a lot of tricks, both sophisticated and simple, to break into other people’s computers.
One of the simpler tools is something called “spearfishing” – sending people e-mails with innocent-sounding attachments that, once downloaded, send private information back to the hacker. Our hacker here is sending attachments called “SalaryAdministrationPolicy.zip” and “SecurityReform.pdf.” You have to wonder who came up with those names.
At one point, the Mandiant employee narrating the video makes a very telling comment about the hacker: “He has used this account for spearfishing messages … most of which seem to be focused on military exercises in the Philippines.” The company doesn’t disclose whom the hacker is targeting, but this comment gives you some hints.
The hacker also uses some specialized software such as HTran, which was first tied to China-based hackers in 2011. Here’s TechWeekEurope explaining how HTran, once embedded in the target computer, allows the hacker to monitor the target:
HTran is a connection bouncer, a kind of proxy server. A “listener” program is hacked stealthily onto an unsuspecting host anywhere on the Internet. When it receives signals from the actual target system, it redirects it to the hacker’s server.

The code was developed by “lion”, a Chinese hacker who is often credited as being the founder of the Honker Union of China (HUC). This group is patriotic to the People’s Republic of China and may be tied to the government – or at least in sympathy with it. The name of the connection bouncer is derived from HUC Packet Transmit Tool, HTran’s official name.
The hacker also uses something called GetMail, which appears to allow him or her to download the contents of the target’s e-mail archive.
Read William Wan’s story from Beijing for more on the report and its implications. We leave you with Mandiant’s “highlights” from its report, which make clear that the security firm seems to consider the Chinese hacking to be significant in scope and scale as well as explicitly linked to the Chinese military:
• APT1 is believed to be the 2nd Bureau of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) General Staff Department’s (GSD) 3rd Department, which is most commonly known by its Military Unit Cover Designator (MUCD) as Unit 61398.
• APT1 has systematically stolen hundreds of terabytes of data from at least 141 organizations.
• APT1 focuses on compromising organizations across a broad range of industries in English-speaking countries.
• APT1 maintains an extensive infrastructure of computer systems around the world.
• In over 97% of the 1,905 times Mandiant observed APT1 intruders connecting to their attack infrastructure, APT1 used IP addresses registered in Shanghai and systems set to use the Simplified Chinese language.
• The size of APT1’s infrastructure implies a large organization with at least dozens, but potentially hundreds of human operators.
• In an effort to underscore that there are actual individuals behind the keyboard, Mandiant is revealing three personas that are associated with APT1 activity.
• Mandiant is releasing more than 3,000 indicators to bolster defenses against APT1 operations.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/02/19/fascinating-video-tracks-a-real-chinese-hacker-in-action/ (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/02/19/fascinating-video-tracks-a-real-chinese-hacker-in-action/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 21, 2013, 05:40:00 PM
Medical Marijuana Vending Machine Takes Your Fingerprint (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIr3Vr1gNvg#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 21, 2013, 05:41:06 PM
How the CIA turned a 'cat' into a 'rat'

The Central Intelligence Agency is continuously looking for new and innovative ways to spy on unknowing suspects. In the 1960s, the agency used cats as spy agents and a veterinarian would implant a microphone and radio transmitter in the head of the animal. RT's Liz Wahl has more on how the CIA plans to use pets against people

How the CIA turned a 'cat' into a 'rat' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-2uFyrtgTI#ws)
Title: "We Know How To Deflect Asteroids"
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2013, 02:51:18 PM
"We Know How To Deflect Asteroids" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEA6ppe0phw#)
Title: Family Says Their Xbox Was Hacked And Charges Were Added To Their Account
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2013, 02:53:30 PM
Family Says Their Xbox Was Hacked And Charges Were Added To Their Account

Family Says Their Xbox Was Hacked And Charges Were Added To Their Account (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMtpoZx5VQ4#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on April 17, 2013, 10:47:41 PM
Petman - Pentagon's most human-like robot

Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the team at Boston Dynamics revealed the new robot which is outfitted with systems that "simulate human physiology". Known as the Protection Ensemble Test Mannequin --or PETMAN robot for short, can run, jump and even splits.

Petman - Pentagon's most human-like robot (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5jJDdIGtfQ#ws)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on April 17, 2013, 11:39:58 PM
ROBOT ANTS (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fx3i9xytP1k#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 24, 2013, 08:42:57 AM
NASA tries to produce 3D-printed pizza

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-I8Lj2g51SI
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on May 24, 2013, 10:57:36 PM
That was interesting......and a hot little red head too.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 09, 2013, 01:15:15 AM
United Nations Debates Killer Combat Robots On The Battlefield

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOKdfmbe8lA
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monroe Native on June 10, 2013, 07:31:31 AM
Uhhhh....  drones have been around how long now?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 13, 2013, 02:49:04 AM
Uhhhh....  drones have been around how long now?
Again you've shown you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...not sure if the city schools can be blamed or perhaps it's more indicative that some people are incapable of learning.

Simply clicking the link may have saved yourself a bit of embarrassment.

But then any attempt to intelligently comment could've possibly interfered with your role on MT as the chief antagonist.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monroe Native on June 13, 2013, 08:30:30 AM
Again you've shown you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...not sure if the city schools can be blamed or perhaps it's more indicative that some people are incapable of learning.

Simply clicking the link may have saved yourself a bit of embarrassment.

But then any attempt to intelligently comment could've possibly interfered with your role on MT as the chief antagonist.


Thanks for the name calling.  You have once again lived up to your role as being righteously acrimonious.

I think you've taken the title of "chief antagonist" a long time ago.  Don't be so humble.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 27, 2013, 05:13:08 AM
"The peculiar circumstances of journalist Michael Hastings' death in Los Angeles last week have unleashed a wave of conspiracy theories.

Now there's another theory to contribute to the paranoia: According to a prominent security analyst, technology exists that could've allowed someone to hack his car. Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke told The Huffington Post that what is known about the single-vehicle crash is "consistent with a car cyber attack."*

There have been several theories about the fatal car crash that caused the death of esteemed journalist, Michael Hastings. Prominent security analyist Richard Clarke, the former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism, is saying that the evidence we have on Michael Hastings crash is actually consistent with a cyber attack; it is possible his car was hacked. Clarke is not a conspiracy theory crackpot-- his words should not be debunked as quackery. At the very least, the crash deserves much more investigation. If the allegations of car cyber attacks are even plausible, this is a truly terrifying development people the world over should care about.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Arz6Fnflnhc
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 27, 2013, 05:17:17 AM
Was Michael Hastings' Car Hacked? Richard Clarke Says It's Possible

The peculiar circumstances of journalist Michael Hastings' death in Los Angeles last week have unleashed a wave of conspiracy theories.

Now there's another theory to contribute to the paranoia: According to a prominent security analyst, technology exists that could've allowed someone to hack his car. Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke told The Huffington Post that what is known about the single-vehicle crash is "consistent with a car cyber attack."

Clarke said, "There is reason to believe that intelligence agencies for major powers" -- including the United States -- know how to remotely seize control of a car.

"What has been revealed as a result of some research at universities is that it's relatively easy to hack your way into the control system of a car, and to do such things as cause acceleration when the driver doesn't want acceleration, to throw on the brakes when the driver doesn't want the brakes on, to launch an air bag," Clarke told The Huffington Post. "You can do some really highly destructive things now, through hacking a car, and it's not that hard."

"So if there were a cyber attack on the car -- and I'm not saying there was," Clarke added, "I think whoever did it would probably get away with it."

Authorities have said that it may take weeks to determine a cause of death for Hastings, but that no foul play is suspected.

Hastings was driving a 2013 Mercedes C250 coupe when he crashed into a tree on Highland Ave. in Los Angeles at approximately 4:30 am on June 18. Video posted online showed the car in flames, and one neighbor told a local news crew she heard a sound like an explosion. Another eyewitness said the car's engine had been thrown 50 to 60 yards from the car. There were no other vehicles involved in the accident.

The fire was so all-consuming that it took the Los Angeles County coroner's office two days to identify Hastings' body, but Clarke said a cyber attack on the vehicle would have been nearly impossible to trace "even if the dozen or so computers on board hadn't melted."

Hastings practiced a brand of no-holds-barred journalism that tended to anger powerful people. His 2010 profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal, published in Rolling Stone, was so damaging that it ostensibly prompted President Barack Obama to fire the general (the president denied that the article had a role in his decision).

In the days before his death, Hastings was reportedly working on a story about a lawsuit filed by Jill Kelley, who was involved in the scandal that brought down Gen. David Petraeus, according to the LA Times. KTLA reported that Hastings told colleagues at the news site BuzzFeed that he feared the FBI was investigating him. On June 20, the FBI denied that any investigation was under way.

"I believe the FBI when they say they weren't investigating him," said Clarke. "That was very unusual, and I'm sure they checked very carefully before they said that."

Clarke worked for the State Department under President Ronald Reagan and headed up counterterrorism efforts under Presidents George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He also served as a special adviser on cyberterrorism to the younger Bush and published a book on the topic, Cyber War, in 2010.

"I'm not a conspiracy guy. In fact, I've spent most of my life knocking down conspiracy theories," said Clarke, who ran afoul of the second Bush administration when he criticized the decision to invade Iraq after 9/11. "But my rule has always been you don't knock down a conspiracy theory until you can prove it [wrong]. And in the case of Michael Hastings, what evidence is available publicly is consistent with a car cyber attack. And the problem with that is you can't prove it."

Clarke said the Los Angeles Police Department likely wouldn't have the expertise to trace such an attack. "I think you'd probably need the very best of the U.S. government intelligence or law enforcement officials to discover it."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/24/michael-hastings-car-hacked_n_3492339.html
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:02:03 PM
The World's Fresh Water Could Be Depleted Within 2 Generations, Scientists Turn To The Seas (VIDEO)

A statement was released recently claiming that within two generations the general population will be struggling with massive water shortages, so chemists are looking to the seas for a new supply.

The research team created a method for removing salt from water using small electrical fields, according to a University of Texas press release.

The new system, called electrochemically mediated seawater desalination, is very low-energy and able to run on a simple store-bought battery. It eliminates the high-energy waste of past methods and doesn't need a membrane to serve its function.

"The availability of water for drinking and crop irrigation is one of the most basic requirements for maintaining and improving human health," said Richard Crooks of The University of Texas at Austin. "Seawater desalination is one way to address this need, but most current methods for desalinating water rely on expensive and easily contaminated membranes.

"The membrane-free method we've developed still needs to be refined and scaled up, but if we can succeed at that, then one day it might be possible to provide fresh water on a massive scale using a simple, even portable, system," he said.

We don't have to wait for the world's fresh water to run dry to put this technology to good use. About a third of the planet is already thirsty and living in water-stressed areas.

"People are dying because of a lack of freshwater," Tony Frudakis, founder and CEO of Okeanos Technologies said. "And they'll continue to do so until there is some kind of breakthrough, and that is what we are hoping our technology will represent."

In order to desalinize the water, the researchers apply three volts of electricity a plastic chip filled with salty water. There's a microchannel with two branches inside of the chip. At the channel's junction an electrode neutralizes a portion of the chloride ions to create an "ion depletion zone" which increases the electric field. The field redirects the salt into one branch of the microchannel, removing it from the water.

"The neutralization reaction occurring at the electrode is key to removing the salts in seawater," said Kyle Knust, first author of the paper. "This was a proof of principle. We've made comparable performance improvements while developing other applications based on the formation of an ion depletion zone. That suggests that 99 percent desalination is not beyond our reach."

The only problem is the current size of the device, a much larger system would have to be built in order to provide water to a group of people. The researchers are confident this can be accomplished.

"You could build a disaster relief array or a municipal-scale unit," Frudakis said. "Okeanos has even contemplated building a small system that would look like a Coke machine and would operate in a standalone fashion to produce enough water for a small village."

http://www.hngn.com/articles/6541/20130628/worlds-fresh-water-depleted-within-2-generations-scientists-turn-seas.htm

===========

Desalination Device Could Mean Fresh Water for All [VIDEO]

A month after 500 of the world's leading water scientists issued the stark warning that in two generations, the majority of humanity will be facing a shortage of fresh water, researchers have introduced a new method for the desalination of seawater that consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques.

Capable of running off of a store-bought battery, the process evades the problems confronting current desalination methods by eliminating the need for a membrane and by separating salt and water at a microscale.
 More here:
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/2702/20130628/desalination-device-mean-fresh-water-video.htm

=========

Current methods for removing the salt from seawater to make it drinkable involve a lot of time and energy, but scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Marburg in Germany have invented something that may drastically change how we desalt ocean water. The new solution requires so little energy, in fact, that it can be operated with a store-bought battery, the scientists explained in a press release.

More here:
http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/new-desalination-method-can-run-on-store-bought-battery-researchers-say/

==========

http://news.discovery.com/tech/tiny-channels-take-salt-from-seawater-130628.htm
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:27:09 PM
Okay...knowing this forum has been historically popular with engineers...chemical or otherwise...and just in case venture capitalists, geologists, and entrepreneurs...here's something with great potential:

Processing Is Key Element in US Rare-Earth Woes

 Red state or blue state, liberal or libertarian, Americans share an addiction to rare-earth elements imported from China.

Green technologies such as electric cars, wind turbines, solar panels and fluorescent light bulbs rely on rare-earth metals. The military depends on rare earths for guided missile systems, satellites and unmanned drones. NASA's spacecraft carry powerful rare earth magnets to Mars and outer space. The magnets also miniaturized iPads, computers and high-tech headphones.

China controls 95 percent of the world's rare-earth supply. The key to this monopoly isn't an abundance of rare-earth deposits, but its expertise in processing ore into oxides and pure metal. The ore tends to carry uranium and thorium, the most radioactive element on the planet, and extracting the metal is typically a long, multistage process involving toxic chemicals.

"We know where the deposits are. Having them end up in your iPhone is not a straight or simple process," said Brad Van Gosen, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver.

A few years ago, China showed its power, and cut the supply of rare earths to a trickle. The move sent the United States and other countries scrambling to end their reliance on China. Prices soared, drawing new investors and mining companies into the rare earth market. Now, the United States has one new mine nearly finished and two more in the permitting stages. But the crucial element in escaping China's rare-earth rule isn't new mines, it's rebuilding the expertise and infrastructure to process the finicky metals, experts say.

Price war

In 2010, China spiked the cost of rare-earth elements when it started restricting exports and charging foreign companies higher prices. The price bubble sparked a worldwide frenzy to escape China's control. A new Australian-owned processing plant just opened in Malaysia. Others are planned in Canada, Europe and Africa. Several companies are also trying to develop an American supply for rare earths, some with support from the Department of Defense. [Infographic: Energy-Critical Elements to Watch]

"The rare earths are very much strategic metals, and particularly very much of strategic importance to the defense industry," said Curt Freeman, president of Avalon Development Corp. in Fairbanks, Alaska, a mining consulting firm. "There's a queasy feeling in Congress and the Department of Defense," he said.

In the United States, California's Mountain Pass mine reopened in 2010 and is expected to start producing light rare-earth elements this year. The mine was once the world's biggest producers of rare earths, but shut down in 2002 because of environmental problems and falling prices. Another mine is proposed in Wyoming, by Canadian company Rare Element Resources, but faces opposition from local residents.

Alaska's newest resource


 One of the biggest rare-earth gambles is at Alaska's Bokan Mountain. Once mined for uranium, the granite peak on Prince of Wales Island contains rich veins of the harder-to-find heavy rare-earth elements. The project has strong support from Alaska's legislature and from nearby communities. A Canadian company plans to extract the ore and transform it into oxides with a custom-built processing plant. Therein lies the challenge.

Despite their name, rare earths are actually common in Earth's crust, though in low concentrations. The moniker is a holdover from the 19th century, when researchers discovered the oddly named elements in rarely found minerals. The 17 elements share a close affinity, with similar chemical properties and atomic weights. Bokan Mountain is one of the few spots on Earth with a bounty of heavy rare-earth elements, which have higher atomic weights. It's especially elevated in yttrium, which appears in everything from cubic zirconia and car pollution sensors to lasers, rockets and jet engines.

Because rare earths are often all mixed together in one rock, separating the heavy rare earths usually requires removing the lighter ones first. This is typically done with a series of chemical tanks and solvents. Plus, there's the radioactive uranium to dispose of. But mine owner Ucore says it has a new solid-extraction technology that greatly simplifies this process. The technique relies on nanotechnology to remove impurities and concentrate the heavy rare earths into oxides, according to Ucore. The Department of Defense funded Ucore's ore extraction research with a contract in October 2012.

Costly withdrawal

 But a USGS-funded study found Bokan Mountain's vein system is very complex, with a mix of at least two dozen ore minerals, the agency's Van Gosen said. The study was published Jan. 22 in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences.

"It's getting more and more complicated the more we look at it," Van Gosen said.

Metals industry consultant Gareth Hatch notes that processing is the biggest hurdle for rare-earth mining companies.

 "Processing is the key challenge for deposits that particularly are skewed toward the middle and heavy rare earths, because they have some unusual minerals that haven't been processed before," said Hatch, founding principal of Technology Metals Research. Hatch is helping develop a rare earth processing company in Canada.

The USGS has several ongoing projects examining the geology of Bokan Mountain, to better understand how the minerals appeared.

"The idea is to develop a fundamental understanding of how these deposits get started in the first place in Earth's crust, and use it to go look for resources that the U.S. public needs," said Susan Karl, a USGS geologist based in Anchorage.

Ucore board member Jaroslav Dostal, an emeritus professor at Saint Mary's University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was lead author of the Bokan Mountain study. The grant program that provided funding for the study, the USGS Mineral Resources External Research Program, has awarded projects to private industry and foreign recipients in the past.

Investing in processing

 The USGS also has projects exploring the geology of other rare-earth deposits. Since 2010, the House of Representatives has introduced legislation to curb mining regulations and fund rare-earth research and development, which have yet to pass the Senate. Recycling of rare-earth metals, which is not always made possible with high-tech gadgetry, is another way to reduce dependency on China's supply. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense recommended stockpiling $120 million of critical heavy rare-earth elements. But industry experts say money would be better spent on building American expertise and infrastructure in processing rare earths. [The Common Elements of Innovation]

"In terms of full-blown capacity, Molycorp [in California] does have its light rare-earth separation facility, but other than that, there is really nothing in North America," Hatch, the industry consultant, said.

"The capability to process and convert [rare earths] from minerals into compounds that go into high-tech equipment is the key bottleneck not just in the U.S., but also the world," he said.
http://www.livescience.com/37356-heavy-rare-earth-mining-america.html
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:31:48 PM
Where to Find Rare Earth Elements

Every time I see a commercial for a new cell phone, I feel a bit nauseous. I love a new cell phone just like the next person, but because of my training as a materials scientist, I feel like a worker in a sausage factory. Cell phones, like sausages, may be great, but you don’t really want to know what it takes to make them.

Our lust for new devices isn’t sustainable, at least not yet. Some of the key materials used to make them, mainly rare earth elements, are in tight supply, in part because the primary source of rare earths are mines in one country, China. About 97% of rare earths come from China, which has become increasingly protective of its bounty.

Rare earth elements are peppered throughout your phone, from the glass display, making it harder, to magnets in speakers, headphones, and vibrating motors, making them more powerful despite their small size. China’s monopoly has driven up prices on rare earths, raising costs for manufacturers.

But cell phones aren’t the only products affected by the monopoly. They are found in electric cars, wind turbines, solar cells, and batteries—key components of a future powered by alternative energy. Demand for rare earths is high and certain to grow in the coming decades. A hybrid Toyota Prius, for example, uses nearly 20 pounds of rare earths in its battery alone. There are more than 2 million Priuses on the road, and it’s just one of many hybrid and electric vehicles being sold today. A restricted supply of rare earths could thwart efforts to wean ourselves off oil.

Digging Deeper

Now, rare earths are not common, but they’re actually not that rare, either. The name is leftover from the 15th century when “rare” referred to “strange” or “unusual” materials and “earths” were any mineral or a metal combined with oxygen. If you look at a periodic table, rare earths sit in a row at the bottom called the lanthanides. Those elements, from lanthanum on the left to lutetium on the right plus yttrium and scandium are called the rare earths.

(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/rare-earths-periodic-table-1024x651.jpg)
Rare earth elements include the lanthanide series, ytterium, and scandium, highlighted here in light blue.

Rare earths are not easy to mine. Like many minerals, they aren’t often found in pure veins, so they need to be separated from the surrounding rock and from one another. But the difficulty in obtaining them hasn’t dampened demand. Rare earths are ubiquitous in the consumer electronics industry, not just cell phones. Nearly every item with an on-off switch contains rare earths.

From 1940 to 1990, the United States produced and mined its own rare earths. One huge mine in southern California, called Mountain Pass, was the biggest resource in the U.S. The invention of the color TV in the mid-1960s, which required the rare earth europium to produce the color red, put Mountain Pass on the map. Up until the late 1980s, the mine was the world’s biggest supplier of rare earths.

It wouldn’t last. Mountain Pass was shut down in 2002, having been knocked out by a one-two punch of environmental violations and globalized markets. One of the dirty little secrets about rare-earth mining is that a major by-product is radioactive waste in the form of thorium. As early as 1985, ground-water samples showed the tailing ponds were leaking. By the late 1990s, Mountain Pass had leaked 300,000 gallons on seven separate occasions, spoiling the surrounding desert, which is habitat for the endangered desert tortoise. But the real knockout blow came from China, which has its own substantial deposits. It also had cheap labor, so it could mine the minerals at lower prices. Deng Xiaoping, an influential politician in China, recognized the importance of rare earths in 1992, when he said, “The Middle East has oil, but China has rare earths.” Production in China grew rapidly between 1990-2000, from 16,000 to 73,000 metric tons, an increase of 450%. Meanwhile, production in other countries dropped by 60%.

Sea Change

The tables may be turning, though. In 2004, the owner of Mountain Pass, Molycorp, pledged that it had cleaned up its act and was granted a permit to restart the mining of rare earths. It takes many years to reboot such an involved operation, but in 2012, Molycorp said they were on track to produce nearly 20,000 metric tons of rare earths. This year, that amount should double.

Many countries, including the U.S., Australia, India, Brazil, Vietnam, and Russia, are looking for new deposits of their own. Japanese scientists found large amounts of rare earth elements in mud at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, and similar studies have shown they’re also in mud in Jamaica. In the far future, we could even turn to the Moon, which is unusually rich in rare earths.

Over the next few years, says Thomas Graedel, an industrial ecologist at Yale University and an expert in rare earths, the U.S. government should encourage domestic production at Mountain Pass. That’s because it takes up to 12 years to make a new mine operational, and we’ll certainly need more rare earths in the intervening years. “We [should] push Congress to do what is possible to help Mountain Pass remain a reasonable business,” he says.

Mining Your Desk Drawers


But that’s not all we can do. One way we can all contribute is by digging our old cell phones out of our desks. Each phone contains up to a few grams of rare earths. That might not seem like much, but when you add up the over 500 million retired cell phones that live in desk drawers, closets, and shoeboxes, you start to get somewhere. Recycling old electronics will not only free up valuable rare earths, but also copper, gold, palladium, and platinum. Think of your used cell phone as a miniature gold mine.

Companies would be wise to initiate incentives to promote this recycling habit, too. Currently, only about 1% of cell phones get recycled. Credits toward new purchases or gift cards could get things rolling. In the meantime, you can drop off your retired cell phones at certain businesses (the EPA maintains a list), or they can be mailed to a recycling facility or donated to a charity. Every little bit helps. Just think, if you recycle your old phone today, your future self may thank you for the brilliant new features on the iPhone 10.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/physics/rare-earth-elements-in-cell-phones/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:33:02 PM
Are Rare Earth Metals a National Security Issue?

Currently there is a legislative proposal before the Armed Services Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives to encourage the U.S. Department of Defense to buy up volumes of strategic rare earth elements. According to Canadian rare earth minerals producer Ucore Rare Metals, the legislation calls for the U.S. government to spend $41 million to stockpile six critical metals, including dysprosium and yttrium.

The 17 so-called rare earth minerals, e.g., the lanthanides, scandium, and yttrium, as well as associated metals molybdenum and tungsten, are needed in the production of items such as cell phones, other popular consumer electronics, and batteries — as well as in electronics governing defense systems and missiles.

According to a report from IHS Chemical, in Houston, production and consumption of rare earth minerals totaled over 100,000 metric tons in 2012. IHS’s study estimates that from 2012 to 2017, global demand for rare earth products will grow by 7.6 percent annually and reach more than 150,000 metric tons, with China leading consumption growth at 8.3 percent annually.

Contrary to the term, rare earths are actually abundant — far more than silver and gold. Australia, the U.S., and other have nations have reserves. But world production is predominantly controlled by China — and now some are saying it is a national security issue for the U.S.

Access to rare earth elements has been a geopolitical hot button. China’s price undercutting in the 1990s has led to the discontinuance of extraction in other countries. China now controls about 95 percent of world rare earths volume, despite having just over 20 percent of the world’s proven reserves.

In January Rare Earth Investing News reported that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) allocated up to $120 million “for the creation of a rare earths research facility aimed at decreasing the nation’s dependence on rare earth elements from China. Called the Critical Materials Institute, its aim is to “bring together leading researchers from academia, the private sector, and four DOE national laboratories.”

The objective is to ensure a steady, dependable rare earths supply for domestic needs. But until that occurs, the federal government is seeking other methods of ensuring supply, hence the House legislation.

Manufacturers, however, don’t appear to be feeling a rare earth minerals supply pinch. In May 2012, when the World Trade Organization was pressured to open a case against China for unfair trade practices that tightened rare earth metals supply, The Wall Street Journal reported that much of China’s export quota was going unused due to a drop in worldwide demand.

“Only about half of last year’s 30,184-ton quota was used,” WSJ reported, citing Beijing-based rare-earth consulting firm Baichuan Information. The outlet added that “major rare-earth exports in March this year fell more than 70 percent compared with a year earlier.”

That’s not to say there could not be supply problems if geopolitical winds shift. In 2010 Forbes noted that China enacted a low-key rare-earth metals embargo against the U.S. as part of a tiff over green energy concerns, writing that “the losers include the manufacturers who rely on rare earths. In the U.S., those are primarily makers of catalytic converters, along with the metal-alloying and ceramic-making sectors.”

Manufacturers that depend on rare earth elements thus could potentially be the victims of trade tussles. The national security initiative to stockpile six rare earth minerals could become beneficial at such a time.

But as Gareth Hatch, a rare earth expert and co-founder of Technology Metals Research, told The Financialist in April, “The probability of (supply) disruption is probably fairly low.”

Still, while there are R&D possibilities for rare earth replacements that render the minerals unnecessary in some applications, manufacturers will be monitoring geopolitics and trade issues with an eye toward rare earth metals supply ramifications.

http://news.thomasnet.com/IMT/2013/06/20/are-rare-earth-metals-a-national-security-issue/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:34:57 PM
China's Ace in the Hole: Rare Earth Elements

On February 4, 2010, nearly 2 weeks after the Obama administration unveiled a $6.4 billion arms deal with Taiwan, a Chinese article posted on an online Chinese Communist Party–connected daily newspaper site, as well as on many Chinese blogs and military news sources, suggested banning the sale of rare earth elements (REEs) to U.S. companies as retribution.1 There was already ample Western concern about potential diminishing access to supplies of REEs, particularly after a 2009 draft report written by China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology called for a total ban on foreign shipments of terbium, dysprosium, ytterbium, thulium, and lutetium, and a restriction of neodymium, europium, cerium, and lanthanum exports.2 The report immediately caused an uproar among rare earth buyers because China produces approximately 97 percent of the world's REEs. While there are sources of rare earth around the world, it could take anywhere from 10 to 15 years from the time of discovery to begin a full-scale rare earth operation.

REEs are important to hundreds of high-tech applications, including critical military-based technologies such as precisionguided weapons and night-vision goggles. In exploring the idea of global military might, China appears to be holding an unlikely trump card. The country's grasp on the rare earth element industry could one day give China a strong technological advantage and increase its military superiority. This article focuses on rare earth elements and their importance to military technology. It also demonstrates how China's research and development programs, coupled with its vast reserves of REEs, have the potential to make the country a dominant force in the world.

Background

REEs are those chemical elements on the periodic table having atomic numbers 57 through 71 (known as the lanthanides), scandium, and yttrium (atomic numbers 21 and 39). Scandium and yttrium are generally grouped with the lanthanides because of their similar properties and because they are normally found within the same deposits when mined.

The term rare earth is actually a misnomer; these elements are not rare at all, being found in low concentrations throughout the Earth's crust and in higher concentrations in certain minerals. REEs can be found in almost all massive rock formations. However, their concentrations range from ten to a few hundred parts per million by weight. Therefore, finding them where they can be economically mined and processed presents a challenge.

For at least the past five decades, international scientists and engineers have understood the importance of REEs to military technology. For some, the topic of rare earth has even been shrouded in secrecy. For example, in Russia, REEs were once considered a national secret, with little mention being made about them prior to 1993. Their secret applications were long confined to those organizations, such as the Ministry of Medium Machine Building, Ministry of Nuclear Energy, and Ministry of Nonferrous Metallurgy, that were responsible for the research, design, and production of military equipment and weapons systems. The reason for their secrecy was simple. More than 80 percent of the rare earth industry went into the former Soviet Union's defense systems.3

Today, many foreign and domestic analysts view REEs as a key factor in developing modern military technology. For example, one Chinese article attributed "night vision instruments with the REE lanthanum" as a "source of the overwhelming dominance of U.S. military tanks during the Gulf War."4 In China, REEs have been described as a "treasure trove" of new material and the "vitamins of modern industry."5 REEs have also been described as "materials of the future."6

In 1993, Vyacheslav Trubnikov, first deputy director of Russia's Foreign Intelligence Service, reportedly sent a letter about REEs to Oleg Soskovets, the Russian Federation's first vice premier, saying, "We have been receiving information indicating that advanced industrial countries are making increasing use of REEs due to progress in creating and developing qualitatively new, specialized materials with them that increase the critical parameter values of high technology products in the fields of rocket-space and aviation, microelectronics, and electrical engineering."7

Not only are REEs used to greatly improve the qualities and properties in the metallurgy industry, they are also used in the fields of lasers, fluorescents, magnets, fiber optic communications, hydrogen energy storage, and superconducting materials— all key technologies that have been successfully applied to modern militaries.8

Military Applications

Of course, not all REEs are created equal. Some experts predict that by 2015 there will be a shortage of neodymium, terbium, and dysprosium, while supplies of europium, erbium, and yttrium could become tight.9 The neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets are so strong that they are ideal for the miniaturization of a variety of technologies, including possible nanotechnologies. Many solid state lasers use neodymium due to its optimal selection of absorption and emitting wavelengths. Consumption of neodymium is expected to increase significantly as more wind turbines come online. Wind may be "free," but some of the newer generation wind turbines use up to two tons of these magnets. Terbium and dysprosium can be additives to enhance the coercivity in NdFeB magnets.10 Yttrium is used, along with neodymium, in lasers. Europium is the most reactive of the REEs. Along with its current use in phosphors for fluorescent lamps and television/computer screens, it is being studied for possible use in nuclear reactors.11 Erbium is used as an amplifier for fiber optic data transmission. It has also been finding uses in nuclear applications and metallurgy. For example, adding erbium to vanadium, a metal used in nuclear applications and high-speed tools, lowers the hardness and improves the workability of the metal.

Samarium is another REE used in military applications. Samarium is combined with cobalt to create a permanent magnet with the highest resistance to demagnetization of any material known. Because of its ability to withstand higher temperatures without losing its magnetism, it is essential in both aerospace and military applications. Precision-guided munitions use samarium-cobalt (SmCo) permanent magnet motors to direct the flight control surfaces (fins). SmCo can also be used as part of stealth technology in helicopters to create white noise to cancel or hide the sound of the rotor blades. These magnets are used in defense radar systems as well as in several types of electronic countermeasure equipment, such as the Tail Warning Function.12

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, substitutes are available for many rare earth applications, but they are generally less effective. 13 Steven Duclos, chief scientist with General Electric Global Research asserts, "There's no question that rare earths do have some properties that are fairly unique, but for many applications these properties are not so unique that you cannot find similar properties in other materials. [REEs] are just better, from either a weight, strength, or optical property and that's why people have moved to them." Duclos went on to explain, "It always comes down to a tradeoff. You can build a motor that does not have rare earth permanent magnets in it. It will be bigger and heavier for a given amount of power or torque that you want."14

Some scientists argue that in many cases, while there may be substitutes, the tradeoff would diminish military superiority. According to George Hadjipanayis, a Richard B. Murray Chair Professor of Physics at the University of Delaware, the alnico and ferrite magnets, the first two permanent magnets ever produced, do not have rare earth in them and their performance is much lower. Hadjipanayis is currently working with a group of researchers to develop a "next generation magnet" that will be stronger than either the NdFeB or SmCo magnets. The project is being conducted using a three-tiered approach:15

http://www.ndu.edu/press/chinas-ace-in-the-hole.html
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:36:46 PM
From 2012:

China's Rare Earth Metals Monopoly Needn't Put An Electronics Stranglehold On America

China presently produces more than 95% of all rare earth materials that are vital in the creation of a big variety of electronic technologies including lithium car batteries, solar panels, wind turbines, flat-screen television, compact fluorescent light bulbs, petroleum-to-gasoline catalytic cracking, and military defense components such as missile guidance systems. It also dominates abilities to process them. This enables it to attract product manufactures to operate there as a condition of doing business, ration exports to maximize prices, and punish nations that don’t go along with its policy interests through supply embargoes. Beijing reduced rare earth shipments by 9% in 2010 over 2009, and has recently announced plans to reduce exports by another 35%.

China produces the vast majority of two particularly important rares, dysprosium (99 percent) and neodymium (95 percent). The motor of a Prius requires about 3 pounds of the latter. While other countries, including the U.S., have significant amounts of these, China’s low-cost labor and lax environmental restrictions has afforded it a big advantage in this mining-intensive industry.

Last year Congress required the Pentagon to examine the use of rare earth materials in defense applications to determine if non-U.S. supplies might be disrupted and identify ways to ensure adequate supplies by 2015. In response, the Pentagon sent back an unpublished report last month titled “Rare Earth Materials in Defense Applications” which concluded that the military is in pretty good general shape except for yttrium, an element used mostly in lasers. While China produced about 98% of the world’s yttrium in 2011, U.S. natural reserves of that material are about half as large.

Is it time to end that Chinese monopoly control of materials important to our military and to high-tech manufacturing?  Following years of unsuccessful efforts, the Obama administration now appears to realize the importance of doing so, announcing on  March 13 that it intends to press the World Trade Organization to force China to discontinue levying restrictions on rare earth exports. While WTO rules technically permit export quotas on natural resources for environmental purposes (which China claims to be the case in regard to rare earths), trade lawyers argue that China’s caps on its export violates that spirit.  They note that while Beijing has been cutting access to these vital materials by other countries through quotas, it has been slow to limit rigid production limits at home that might help to protect the natural environment.

Some other countries are also working to ensure access to rare earths. After China enacted a 2010 embargo on rare earth shipments to Japan for leverage in a territorial dispute, Japan now maintains a stockpile of seven rares and is talking about offering government loans that encourage companies to fund foreign investments private reserves.  The Toyota and Sojitz Corporations have already entered into tie-ins with Vietnamese rare earth claim-holders. Toyota is also operating a small rare earths mine in India.

Elsewhere in the Far East, South Korea announced plans last year to stockpile 76,000 tons of rares over the next five years, about 10% of all global production. The country has allocated a huge $8 billion war chest for this purpose, an amazing sum considering that its economy is one-fifteenth the size of ours.

In Europe, Sweden has declared a Norra Harr heavy rare earth project owned by Tasman Metals, Ltd. to be in its “national interest” under the Swedish Environment Act; and German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently inked an agreement to obtain rare earths from Mongolia.

American companies are on their own in the rare earth race, and some of them, along with taxpayers, may reasonably prefer to keep it that way… so long as government will get out of their way. A 2010 U.S. Geological Survey Report estimates that known reserves of rare oxides are about 1.5 million tons, and total domestic resources might be 13 million tons.  At peak 10,200 2007 U.S. consumption levels, supplies from known reserves would last nearly 150 years, and possibly more than one thousand years if other resources are explored and exploited. In addition, other friendly, stable countries like Australia and Canada have substantial rare earth deposits as well. The Australian mining company Lynas Corporation aims to annually produce 11,000 tons of rare earth oxides from its new Mount Weld mine.

Up until the 1990s, the U.S. dominated world rare earth production, primarily drawing upon the Mountain Pass mine in southern California. The mine was closed in 2002 in response to a combination of environmental restrictions and lower rare earth prices, although processing of previously mined ore from the site has continued. Molycorp Minerals, the current owner, is now reopening it with the goal of producing 20,000 tons of rare earths in the near-term, and 40,000 tons by mid-decade. It claims that a new milling process will enable material production at half of the cost that the Chinese are currently charging. W.R.Grace has announced a deal with Molycorp that could lock up three-quarters of Molycorp’s planned lanthanum production.

Molycorp has recently struck a $1.3 billion deal that paves the way to ship minerals from its California mine to Chinese operations of a Neo Material Technologies arm called Magnequench. General Motors originally sold Magnequench in 1995 to a group of investors that included government-owned China National Non-Ferrous Materials Import and Export.

There’s really no good reason for America to depend on imports for many rare earths that we have right here. While China produces 99% of the world’s dysprosium, a heavy variety used in such applications as computer hard drives, wind turbine generators, cordless tool motors and audio systems, for smart phone manufacture, locations in Idaho, Montana, Colorado, Missouri, Utah and Wyoming are likely to contain heavy rare earth deposits of the yttrium group. Most of these sites, however, are in early exploratory stages of development.  It will require seven to fifteen years before production can even begin after capital is secured.  After that, it is likely to require an additional two to five years more to develop pilot plants capable of refining the ore into pure metals.

Neo Material is one of the leading expert companies for chemistry needed to transform rare earths into specialized magnets. While Molycorp says that the deal creates the most diversified rare earth company outside China, Ed Richardson, president of the U.S. Magnetic Association regards it as worrisome.  He argues that the U.S. is already “dangerously dependent on China” for materials which include those needed in weapons systems, and that Molycorp’s “export of U.S. rare earth assets into China will only exacerbate this problem.”

And there’s an even bigger problem. Assuming that large U.S. deposits of heavy rares exist, developing them on a scale necessary to meet projected demands will require rolling back decades of EPA obstacles in order to make mining and processing cheap enough for American industries to be competitive and profitable.

Some companies in the U.S. and abroad are working to address these issues through development and use of alternate non-rare earth materials. General Electric has recently announced the development of a “super alloy” that could replace rares, but admits that commercialization still has a long way to go. Frank Johnson, a GE materials scientist said “… we’re exploring several hard and soft materials but haven’t selected a special chemistry yet.”

Researchers at DOE’s Ames Laboratory are working to replace rare earth elements in magnets with electrolytic manganese. Not surprisingly, Larry Reaugh, CEO of American Manganese Inc. agrees, commenting that “The rare earth squeeze has made companies go full bore looking for alternatives, and manganese has been found to be one of the more diversified metals out there as an alternative. Researchers are looking to manganese to replace rare earths in magnets, which may be even stronger.”

Other companies are pursuing alternatives as well. NovaTorque, a California startup, has developed electric motors using low-cost ferrite magnets that the company claims outperform those made out of neodymium. Hitachi in Japan is also developing ferrite magnets for use in hybrid cars. Korean scientists are working on computer memories based upon grapheme oxide, a combination of common carbon and oxygen.

So where does all of this ultimately leave America’s electronics future? The good news is that our country is believed to have the world’s second most plentiful deposits of rare earth resources, and that use of alternative materials may eventually reduce demands even for these. On the other hand, a host of current government policies will likely continue to delay development and utilization of those mineral assets, and successful demonstration of alternatives remains theoretical and uncertain.

While as with energy resources we witness a familiar pattern here, perhaps there is a paradoxical new wrinkle. This time the issues directly pit anti-mining and anti-drilling agendas of environmental activists against their own companion goals to advance rare earth-dependent wind turbines, solar power, and more efficient electric vehicles.

Let’s get real, and acknowledge that the Chinese didn’t create our present rare earth challenges. We alone did through increasing dependence upon confused and conflicting government policies. It’s time to end this nonsense, and rediscover tried and true free market principles that will yield lasting solutions.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larrybell/2012/04/15/chinas-rare-earth-metals-monopoly-neednt-put-an-electronics-stranglehold-on-america/2/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:40:48 PM
A new study by the Wyoming State Geological Survey has identified dozens of possible sources of rare earth metals in Wyoming in addition to deposits in the Bear Lodge Mountains that a company has targeted for mining.

More here:
http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/study-ids-possible-new-rare-earths-sources-in-wyoming/article_7b84adc6-d8a9-56d1-b769-080b2d99c412.html

===========

Many of the fastest growing clean energy technologies, from batteries to solar panels to magnets, are made with materials that have unique chemical and physical characteristics, including magnetic, catalytic and luminescent properties. These materials -- which include some rare earth elements and are often called critical materials -- are essential to the clean energy economy and are at risk for supply disruptions. This map shows countries with significant supplies of rare earth elements, and existing mines, deposits, and occurrences of rare earth elements.

http://energy.gov/maps/estimated-rare-earth-reserves-and-deposits

=========

http://mrdata.usgs.gov/mineral-resources/ree.html

=========

Rare earth element
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare_earth_element

=========

Rare earth prices on the rise

The Chinese government's efforts appear to be paying off with its crackdown on illegal mining of rare earths.

Even as new measures to consolidate the rare earth industry in China are on the cards, prices for the 17 elements have jumped 10% over the past two weeks. The report has indicated that prices of praseodymium-neodymium oxide stood at around $43,000 (270,000 yuan) per tonne on June 25, about $3,237 (20,000 yuan) higher than the price recorded two weeks ago, according to the Shanghai Securities Journal.

Prices of dysprosium oxide and terbium oxide, on the other hand, were quoting at $218,571 (1.35 million yuan) and $420,989 (2.6 million yuan) per tonne respectively on June 25, each higher by $3,237 as compared to a fortnight ago.

The average price of rare earths in 2012 fell close to 40% compared to 2011. To stop the price fall, firms across China adopted strategies such as production suspensions. However, falling demand in downstream sectors and illegal mining curbed the effects of such strategies.

Exports too were hit last year, with China's rare earth exports plummeting 71% given the several international trade suits.

A turnaround in exports was witnessed only in April this year. Chinese exports of rare earth metals were six times higher at 2,196 tonnes, as compared to April 2012.

The government also suspended new prospecting and mining licences for rare earths in a bid to prevent over exploitation. The Asian nation has also been cracking down on the illegal mining of rare earth metals, which could have led to the recent jump in prices.

Local news agencies said illegal mining operations have been rampant at the village of Xianghu, located in the southeastern mountains of the Fujian Province.

Rampant mining has laid the mountainside bare in Xinfeng county of Shaoguan city in the Guangdong province, which is known as the capital of `underground' rare earths.

The crackdown by the government has ensured more whistle-blowers come to the fore. Informants of illegal mining activities are paid $485.924 (3,000 yuan).

Reports indicate that till March 2013, authorities closed 23 illegal mines and 57 processing ponds. Some nine rare earth mines operating illegally in Longchuan county were also shut down over the last six months.
http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/content/en/mineweb-industrial-metals-minerals-old?oid=195948&sn=Detail
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:43:20 PM
From October 2012:

(http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/files/2012/10/Rare-Earths.jpg)
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/10/19/chinas-chokehold-over-rare-earth-metals-is-slipping/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 30, 2013, 05:46:57 PM
Honda to reuse rare earth metal recycled from hybrid vehicle batteries

Honda Motors announced Wednesday that it would, along with TDK Corporation and Japan Metals & Chemicals Co. (JMC) jointly pursue the reuse of a rare earth metal extracted from nickel-metal hydride batteries in hybrid vehicles for magnets of new hybrid vehicle motors.

In March Honda began supplying a battery manufacturer with rare earth metals extracted from used nickel-metal hydride batteries at a JMC plant for reuse in new nickel-metal hydride batteries of hybrid vehicles.

“Now, Honda will expand the reuse of extracted rare earth metals to motors for hybrid vehicles to achieve the further recycling of this limited and precious resource,” the company said in a news release. The three companies will begin in-depth discussions toward the reuse in motors and will begin using the process as soon as an adequate supply of used nickel-metal hydride batteries is secured.

Honda’s process for reusing extracted rare earth metal in motors includes disassembling and scrapping, calcination, pulverization/sorting, acid dissolution which produces an oxide containing rare earth metals, followed by molten salt electrolysis--all taking place at Japan Metals & Chemicals Co.  The rare earth metal produced will then be shipped to TDK Corporation for use in magnets in motors for new hybrid vehicles, which will then be placed in Honda products.
http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/content/en/mineweb-industrial-metals-minerals-old?oid=194693&sn=Detail
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 01, 2013, 10:44:02 AM
Tesla to offer quick electric car battery swaps

A fresh battery can be installed in as little as 90 seconds at a price equal to a tank of gas

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/06/21/tesla-elon-musk-electric-cars-model-s/2444923/

=======

Watch: Tesla Shows Off 90-Second Battery Swapping

http://mashable.com/2013/06/21/tesla-battery-swapping/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on July 01, 2013, 11:15:05 AM
Tesla to offer quick electric car battery swaps

A fresh battery can be installed in as little as 90 seconds at a price equal to a tank of gas

[url]http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/06/21/tesla-elon-musk-electric-cars-model-s/2444923/[/url]

=======

Watch: Tesla Shows Off 90-Second Battery Swapping

[url]http://mashable.com/2013/06/21/tesla-battery-swapping/[/url]


Do they also clean the windshield and check the tire pressure ??? ??? ??? ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: excelsior on July 02, 2013, 12:24:16 AM
Next someone will be suggesting there is no free lunch.

Study: Electric cars no greener than gasoline vehicles

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/Technology/2013/07/01/Study-Electric-cars-no-greener-than-gasoline-vehicles/UPI-40741372711871

BERKELEY, Calif., July 1 (UPI) -- Electric cars, despite their supposed green credentials, are among the environmentally dirtiest transportation options, a U.S. researcher suggests.

Writing in the journal IEEE Spectrum, researcher Ozzie Zehner says electric cars lead to hidden environmental and health damages and are likely more harmful than gasoline cars and other transportation options.

Electric cars merely shift negative impacts from one place to another, he wrote, and "most electric-car assessments analyze only the charging of the car. This is an important factor indeed. But a more rigorous analysis would consider the environmental impacts over the vehicle's entire life cycle, from its construction through its operation and on to its eventual retirement at the junkyard."

Political priorities and corporate influence have created a flawed impression that electric cars significantly reduce transportation impacts, he said.

"Upon closer consideration, moving from petroleum-fueled vehicles to electric cars starts to appear tantamount to shifting from one brand of cigarettes to another," Zehner, a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, said.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monroe Native on July 02, 2013, 07:37:11 AM
But but but but......  environmentalists say we should ALL drive electric cars - powered by Solar and Windmills of course.....

 8*
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 22, 2013, 01:17:10 PM
Scientists from the Bristol Robotics Laboratory in the UK have created the world's first urine-powered fuel cell. Powered by pee, the fuel cell can generate enough energy to power your phone to perform simply tasks. As unorthodox or unappealing as that may sound, it is arguably a fitting evolution for the world's energy production resources, as our energy habit has grown to gross proportions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1XnZwZo88U
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on August 24, 2013, 11:15:34 PM
Tokyo Switches On Rainmaking Machine!

Tokyo Switches On Rainmaking Machine! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIO_FaaTKsI#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 09, 2013, 10:40:29 AM
How Paranoia Will Save Ya

As the world continues to learn about governments and corporations spying on us all, we are becoming more and more paranoid. Web developer Ben West has created a Chrome plug-in called Paranoid Browsing, which creates a false browsing profile for you through a background tab that continually searches and clicks on mundane websites. This adds tons of innocuous noise to your browsing history, making you that much harder to profile.

The Resident: How Paranoia Will Save Ya (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88gTep9Mh_Q#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 09, 2013, 10:52:22 AM
What??

Drug Use Linked To High IQ

"People with high IQs are more likely to smoke marijuana and take other illegal drugs, compared with those who score lower on intelligence tests, according to a new study from the U.K."

Drug Use Linked To High IQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOdrj3EdzAA#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 17, 2013, 09:46:32 AM
Canadian Company Introduces Quietest Passenger Jet Ever

Canadian Company Introduces Quietest Passenger Jet Ever (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iV9S6W6s55c#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 21, 2013, 01:35:49 PM
WALLPAPER TELEVISIONS! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvriKF7LHrU#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 07, 2013, 03:11:42 AM
Earth-Like Planets May Be Much More Common Than Previously Believed

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMvia3wl6Bs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMvia3wl6Bs#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 10, 2013, 01:54:08 PM
Hummingbird-sized drones may be the Army's next big thing

The Black Hornet is a small, flying object, weighing just over half an ounce. It may look cute, but it's not a toy. It's a drone. The Black Hornet was unveiled last week at the Association of the United States Army Expo in Washington, DC. The drone is marketed as a tool that soldiers can carry with them. While the US Army hasn't used the hummingbird-sized drone yet, the British Army has used them in Afghanistan

www.youtube.com/watch?v=c68ONJ74zqw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c68ONJ74zqw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on November 10, 2013, 06:29:06 PM
I can see that as an effective scouting tool for the military, I can also see it being used by LE as a surveillance tool too.  The technology is neat!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on November 11, 2013, 03:03:13 PM
I can see it now - speed trap by mini-drone...   

Not sure what else LE needs a drone for -
well maybe to monitor the hotdog carts around town
and search for that plant or two that may soon be legal
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 14, 2013, 09:14:05 AM
Newest drone to fly, swim and drive

Sandia National Laboratories has created a new kind of unmanned vehicle. Not only does this one fly, but it also swims and drives on land. While being operated from a remote location, it can dodge obstacles and climb on land . This covert vehicle is called the Multi-Modal Vehicle. The project is funded by the US government.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCWacmf7RiU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCWacmf7RiU#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 14, 2013, 02:48:39 PM
Car Runs For 100 Years Without Refueling - The Thorium Car

"If your car was powered by thorium, you would never need to refuel it. The vehicle would burn out long before the chemical did. The thorium would last so long, in fact, it would probably outlive you. That's why a company called Laser Power Systems has created a concept for a thorium-powered car engine. The element is radioactive, and the team uses bits of it to build a laserbeam that heats water, produces steam, and powers an energy-producing turbine.*"

www.youtube.com/watch?v=68A_HPYGdlk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68A_HPYGdlk#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 16, 2013, 02:40:56 PM
Are electric aircraft next for Tesla's Elon Musk?

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/11/12/elon-musk-tesla-spacex-electric-planes/3509361/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/11/12/elon-musk-tesla-spacex-electric-planes/3509361/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 19, 2013, 06:41:24 PM
'Google must pay,' states say

Google has agreed to pay up after 37 states across the U.S. accused it of misrepresentation when it comes to targeted advertising. Normally, when a person searches for a product on Google, cookies notify advertisers that users are looking for that item. But, Apple's Safari browser installed specific software to prevent third-parties like Google from tracking users' online activity. In turn, Google wrote a code to work around that and misled the public into thinking it hadn't. Now, the states are hitting the internet giant where it hurts, in the pocketbook.

'Google must pay,' states say (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE3va8GCzNU#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 24, 2013, 12:21:51 PM
China Successfully Flies STEALTH DRONE For The First Time!

China Successfully Flies STEALTH DRONE For The First Time! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ml2a5UaZ_YA#)

====

Chinese State Media Reporting First Test Flight Of New Stealth Combat Drone Was A Success

Chinese State Media Reporting First Test Flight Of New Stealth Combat Drone Was A Success (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_8nig-YQGw#)

====

China unveils its first stealth drone

China took its first unmanned stealth drone for a 20-minute test flight, state media announced Friday. The "Sharp Sword" drone could be used for both surveillance and missile strikes. In other news, the People's Bank of China announced it is "no longer interested in China's favor to accumulate foreign exchange reserves." China is the biggest buyer of US debt, and holds more than $1 trillion in US Treasury bonds. RT's Ameera David takes a look at how the Chinese bank's decision might affect its current US debt holdings.

China unveils its first stealth drone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkRFc0fA2JA#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on November 24, 2013, 12:26:53 PM
Chinese engineers are the best I have ever seen at re-engineering/reverse engineering that there is.  The clips really don't surprise me that they duplicated this technology so quickly.  You can almost guarantee that one of the primary applications will be for surveillance and control of the people scattered out across the remote countryside.   
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 26, 2013, 01:02:04 AM
Marines Begin Field Testing DARPA Four-Legged Pack Robot

Marines Begin Field Testing DARPA Four-Legged Pack Robot (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBSMSRxav4A#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 26, 2013, 01:04:19 AM
A new, flying jellyfish-like machine

WASHINGTON D.C. Nov. 24, 2013 -- Up, up in the sky: It's a bird! It's a plane! It's a . . . jellyfish? That's what researchers have built -- a small vehicle whose flying motion resembles the movements of those boneless, pulsating, water-dwelling creatures.

The work, which will be presented at the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting on November 24 in Pittsburgh, demonstrates a new method of flight that could transport miniaturized future robots for surveillance, search-and-rescue, and monitoring of the atmosphere and traffic.

Many approaches to building small aerial robots try to mimic the flight of insects such as fruit flies. The challenge in that, explained Leif Ristroph of New York University, is that the flapping wing of a fly is inherently unstable. To stay in flight and to maneuver, a fly must constantly monitor its environment to sense every gust of wind or approaching predator, adjusting its flying motion to respond within fractions of a second. To recreate that sort of complex control in a mechanical device – and to squeeze it into a small robotic frame – is extremely difficult, Ristroph said.

After some tinkering, he devised a new way of flapping-wing flight that doesn't need any sort of control or feedback system to be stable, and is akin to the swimming motions of jellyfish. The prototype device, weighing just two grams and spanning eight centimeters in width, flies by flapping four wings that are arranged like petals on a flower. While the up-and-down motion of the wings resembles a pulsating jelly,, the device's ultimate fluttering flight may be more similar to that of a moth. The vehicle can hover, ascend, and fly in a particular direction.

More here:
http://www.sciencecodex.com/a_new_flying_jellyfishlike_machine-123619 (http://www.sciencecodex.com/a_new_flying_jellyfishlike_machine-123619)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: ussoccer26 on December 17, 2013, 11:17:46 PM
Clicked on the Science & Technology thread within the Science & Technology thread. I should have known better…..
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on December 22, 2013, 08:48:13 AM
Indiana State Police pay thousands for "Stingray" technology

The Indiana State Police paid $373,995 for a device that could allow authorities to capture cell phone data from unsuspecting individuals, according to a newly released document obtained by the Indiana Star. RT's Ameera David has details.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq4w-c4RBVU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xq4w-c4RBVU#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on December 22, 2013, 09:07:43 AM
Google buys producer of military robots

Internet giant Google is moving forward with its purchase of robotics company Boston Dynamics, a darling of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA. Boston Dynamics is the eighth robotics company Google has purchased in the last six months. Google has its own history with robotics as the inventor of the self-driving car. RT's Meghan Lopez takes a look at some of the interesting inventions Boston Dynamics has brought us.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUEN2GQ923E (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUEN2GQ923E#)

====

Google Buying Up Robotics Companies Like Crazy!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZzaqDfz6I8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZzaqDfz6I8#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on December 22, 2013, 09:08:37 AM
Kibo! The First Robot Astronaut! "Japanese People Believe In A Future Where Humans & Robots Coexist"

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCXfaZW8NnQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCXfaZW8NnQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on January 02, 2014, 09:14:01 AM
Pentagon's DARPA hosts humanoid robotics competition

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA, held a robotics competition in Miami, Fla. over the weekend. At the two-day event, the world's best robots were put to the test, competing in tasks designed to help humans in natural or man-made disasters, including opening doors or climbing up stairs, by relying on sensors or cameras to understand their environment. A total of 16 teams competed for the $2 million prize.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-M60igDQUY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-M60igDQUY#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on January 02, 2014, 11:31:52 AM
Real-life Robocop? Machines rise to the challenge

"Dead or alive, you're coming with me," reads the famous quote in Robocop. While the 1987 movie – and the forthcoming remake -- paints a dystopian picture of policing the future, today's robot makers are producing a range of less threatening creations.

Last weekend, 16 teams from five different countries descended on the Homestead-Miami Speedway in Florida for the Darpa Robotics Challenge (DRC). The competition, to find the next humanoid robot capable of working in battle zones and disaster areas, was won by Japanese firm Schaft - recently acquired by Google – which topped the leaderboard with its S-One model which stands around 1.5 meters tall and weighs 95 kilograms.

Darpa (The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development and funding of new technologies for use by the military. The top eight teams, who competed over eight different tasks, will now seek Darpa investment next year before competing again for the chance to win a $2 million prize.

The event may have showcased what tomorrow's products could achieve but away from the limelight, there's a growing network of robotics manufacturers working hard to help integrate machines into defense and law enforcement.

 U.S.-based iRobot, best known for selling 10 million vacuum cleaning robots worldwide including its popular Roomba model, also manufactures a family of four law enforcement machines. They are currently in use by government agencies across the world, with the majority being used by the U.S.'s partners at NATO. The company's robot range -- the FirstLook 100, the 310 SubV, the 510 Packbot and the heavy duty 710 Warrior – aren't humanoid but have been used in Afghanistan, at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant and were deployed by the police during the Boston bombings. They will also be used in Brazil for the upcoming Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup.

Tom Phelps, director of Robotics Products North America at iRobot told CNBC in a telephone interview that the next step for the firm was developing its fleet so they can work better as a team – including increasing the radio range so that a police team can get a better remote view of a building or outside space.

"The trend will be to make sure that the family will work together more seamlessly," he said.

Rather than looking to replace police officers on the beat – as portrayed in Robocop -- iRobot is looking at extending the capabilities of law enforcement agencies, Phelps added. He predicts that robots will be a "standard piece of gear" in the coming years for law enforcers.

 Mark Bunger, a research director at Lux Research, told CNBC that robots can be extremely cost-efficient for police forces.

"Robots that cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars are cost-effective replacements for $3 million police helicopters and their pilots; a $1,000 drone can help two officers scan an area (say for a missing person) that would take ten on foot," he said.

"We're in the 'dot com boom' era of robotics right now," Bunger said. Small robotic startups that he says are making waves include Panoscan, Recon Robotics, Knightscope, and Simulator Systems.

Knightscope boldly states on its website that its mission is to cut crime by 50 percent with autonomous robots and predictive analytics. These machines use video cameras, microphones and thermal imaging and look to effectively "crowdsource security", it says.

 A future of autonomous, mobile machines patrolling the streets is still "a few decades off", according to Bunger. Taking the plight of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or "drones" as an example, Bunger sees police forces 15 years behind the military with ground-based military just starting to adopt robots.

"After components of robot technology are proven there, it is relatively straightforward to engineer out costs and improve performance for police-grade security," he said.
http://www.cnbc.com/id/101294880 (http://www.cnbc.com/id/101294880)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on January 10, 2014, 11:08:57 PM
Ford's New Concept Car Can Last for 21 Miles Fueled Only by Sunlight
http://mashable.com/2014/01/02/ford-solar-energi-car-c-max/ (http://mashable.com/2014/01/02/ford-solar-energi-car-c-max/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on January 18, 2014, 11:31:59 PM
Google Working On SMART Contact Lens

www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJFIQvIMavM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJFIQvIMavM#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 25, 2014, 12:36:44 AM
With Firefox OS, Mozilla begins the $25 smartphone push
http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13970_7-57619338-78/with-firefox-os-mozilla-begins-the- (http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13970_7-57619338-78/with-firefox-os-mozilla-begins-the-)$25-smartphone-push/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 25, 2014, 01:02:17 AM
Artificial 'Yarn Muscles' Are 100 Times Stronger Than Human Muscles, Researchers Say
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/21/artificial-yarn-muscles-human-muscles_n_4830725.html (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/21/artificial-yarn-muscles-human-muscles_n_4830725.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 06, 2014, 03:22:57 AM
NASA discovers 715 new planets, some in habitable zone

Astronomers have announced that 715 new planets have been discovered outside the Earth's solar system, including four planets that are more than double the size of our own. This discovery boosts the number of known planets in our galaxy to over 1,700. The newly discovered planets were all found in multi-planet systems and most are relatively small. Scientists found planets - all of which orbit 305 stars, making up what are known as planetary systems - when they were analyzing the observational data obtained by NASA's Kepler space telescope

NASA discovers 715 new planets, some in habitable zone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCNQgjqVm2w#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on March 11, 2014, 10:44:09 PM
10 ways alternative energy is about to change the way tech gets powered.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-ways-alternative-energy-is-about-to-change-the-way-tech-gets-powered/ (http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-ways-alternative-energy-is-about-to-change-the-way-tech-gets-powered/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 11, 2014, 11:03:08 PM
Interesting...

I wonder if I could harness my farts for alternative power.  I seem to have a lot of them lately..... ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 15, 2014, 03:43:13 AM
3D Printer Built Parts Successfully Used To Reconstruct Man Skull

3D Printer Built Parts Successfully Used To Reconstruct Man Skull (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kE_RYXmxPk#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 15, 2014, 03:45:00 AM
Facebook to buy company that makes solar-powered drones

Facebook is expanding from the cyberworld to out of this world. Facebook is buying drone-making company Titan Aeronautics for $60 million, according to TechCrunch. Titan Aeronautics makes near-orbital, solar-powered drones that can hover in space for up to five years. RT takes a look at the altruistic reason Facebook gives for its big purchase.

Facebook to buy company that makes solar-powered drones (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDDh4dPdflw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 22, 2014, 12:52:23 PM
US Navy readies lasers and rail guns for deployment

Lasers and rail guns are set to enter into service for the US Navy later this year. Long found in sci-fi literature and movies such as Star Wars, the weapons will be used against "asymmetrical" and other threats, according to the Navy. The lasers will be able to fry electronic components and burn through targets, while the rail guns are capable of firing projectiles at several times the speed of sound. Although cheaper than more-conventional missiles and smart bombs, there are still some engineering difficulties to be worked out in order to make them practical for wider use. Gayane Chichakyan examines this new weapon technology.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3t7296cq-o (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3t7296cq-o#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on March 22, 2014, 12:55:16 PM
WOW....that was interesting.

The advancements in technology just overwhelm me at times.......even more than this new Samsung Galaxy phone does, and yes, I'm still struggling with it.  LOL
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 22, 2014, 03:50:29 PM
WOW....that was interesting.

The advancements in technology just overwhelm me at times.......even more than this new Samsung Galaxy phone does, and yes, I'm still struggling with it.  LOL

Because it's 'smarter' than you are......
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 22, 2014, 06:54:27 PM
Pentagon develops hypersonic weaponry

A new hypersonic arms-delivery vehicle able to penetrate highly protected airspace such as China's or Russia's has been developed by the Pentagon. Calling the development of hypersonic arms a top-priority, the Pentagon says that they did not want to be the second country to understand how to develop this type of weaponry. The vehicle is powered by new technology called a scram-jet, which is able to evade traditional air defenses. RT's Ameera David takes a look at the new weaponry.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFu9xwMJWWE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFu9xwMJWWE#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 29, 2014, 12:36:16 AM
New drone steals smartphone contents

Glenn Wilkinson, a hacker from London, has created a drone that is able to steal the contents of smartphones. Called "Snoopy," the drone tricks smartphones into thinking it is a cell tower, enabling it to access all of the data that the phone sends. Wilkinson created the drone in order to showcase some of the weaknesses of smartphones and cellular networks.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=PptcWwlRRL4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PptcWwlRRL4#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on April 23, 2014, 09:37:45 PM
For those who have a problem finding the square root  ;D

(https://scontent-b-ord.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t1.0-9/10151159_930384746990979_6292646734838705585_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 03, 2014, 06:03:35 PM
Pentagon Using Man-Sized Robots For "Humanitarian" Work AND...

"U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel got a first-hand look at a life-size robot that resembles Hollywood's "Terminator," the latest experiment by the Pentagon's hi-tech researchers.

But unlike the cinematic version, the hulking Atlas robot is designed not as a warrior but as a humanitarian machine that would rescue victims in the rubble of a natural disaster, officials said on Tuesday.

The 6-foot-2-inch Atlas is one of the entrants in a contest designed to produce a man-like life-saver machine, the brainchild of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)."

Pentagon Using Man-Sized Robots For "Humanitarian" Work AND... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TE3CJfgaLQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 03, 2014, 06:11:30 PM
How Scientists, Car Companies, And The Military Are Creating The Smartest Energy Solution On The Market

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/05/01/3429627/batteries-smartest-energy-solution/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/05/01/3429627/batteries-smartest-energy-solution/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 28, 2014, 11:49:03 AM
Old cellphones turned into rainforest protectors

Used smartphones may get a second life fighting illegal logging thanks to a San Francisco startup. Rainforest Connection is fundraising on Kickstarter to reconfigure old cellphones to run on solar power and then place them in rainforests to monitor for logging. The organization is already conducting real world tests, but needs funding to expand.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT_laYJLsHc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT_laYJLsHc#)


Not sure how the monthly service charges are handled for the project but it seems this could hold promise for security purposes at remote locations...say a cabin up north not on the grid.
Could even work around here...say someone steps foot on your property.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 28, 2014, 11:51:42 AM
Okay I stumbled upon this and thought the guy resembled quite a few people.

Weekend Project: Spider Rifle

Make a humane, compressed-air-powered bug trapper that removes unwanted, tiny pests from your world

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnKJzCUy9Tw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnKJzCUy9Tw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on June 28, 2014, 04:08:22 PM
You need to build a big one and suck yourself into it........... ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on June 29, 2014, 08:19:48 AM
"Skunk" drone fires pepper spray bullets at protestors

Protestors and rioters may now have to worry about more than just police on foot, thanks to the "Skunk." An aerial drone manufactured by South African company Desert Wolf, the Skunk is capable of shooting up to 80 pepper spray containing rounds of non-lethal ammunition per second while flashing strobe lights and shining lasers at its targets. One of the first customers to buy the new device is, surprisingly, a mining company.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEAhR1efe0E (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEAhR1efe0E#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 05, 2014, 03:35:46 PM
Astronomers discover most Earth-like planet

Researchers discovered another "Earth-like" planet that may be capable of sustaining life. Five times the size of Earth, "Gliese 832 c" is 16 light years away and appears to have a habitable zone and water, opening the possibility for life existing on the planet. RT's Manila Chan takes a look at the newest in a long line of plants that prove we may not be alone in the universe.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaOEf9b0bEo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaOEf9b0bEo#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 13, 2014, 12:35:35 PM
Astronomers discover most Earth-like planet

Researchers discovered another "Earth-like" planet that may be capable of sustaining life. Five times the size of Earth, "Gliese 832 c" is 16 light years away and appears to have a habitable zone and water, opening the possibility for life existing on the planet. RT's Manila Chan takes a look at the newest in a long line of plants that prove we may not be alone in the universe.

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaOEf9b0bEo]www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaOEf9b0bEo[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaOEf9b0bEo#[/url])


A great new home for you.  Maybe it's all bleeding heart liberals like yourself.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 15, 2014, 04:51:02 AM
NASA getting closer to finding alien life

NASA believes we are closer than ever to finding life on other planets, but an extra push is needed to actually achieve this goal. Several experts, including a Nobel Laureate, gathered Monday in Washington to discuss the technology needed to find life outside of Earth and how much longer we may need to wait.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXa9dpgbHsU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXa9dpgbHsU#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 15, 2014, 04:52:19 AM
Navy unveils electromagnetic railgun

The Navy is unveiling its new electromagnetic railgun, preparing the device for deployment on the seas. Capable of launching projectiles without using explosives, the strong electromagnetic field created by the weapon propels its ammunition at over 5,000 mph, enabling the device to destroy a variety of targets

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7esQ-rwkk2w (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7esQ-rwkk2w#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 19, 2014, 02:00:10 PM
Are we alone in the universe?

With the shuttle mission grounded for good, NASA scientists are now searching for signs of life on other planets. Technological advances in telescopes and cameras have brought the answer to the question within the reach of mankind. This week, some of NASA's top thinkers held a panel discussion to talk about their efforts in the search for life.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL4qya3BwBg (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL4qya3BwBg#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on August 06, 2014, 08:20:34 AM
MIT creates new surveillance technology using bag of chips

Closed doors are no longer enough to keep conversations private. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology successfully used a video camera to read the vibrations from the surface of a bag of chips behind soundproof glass, and then used the visual data to reconstruct and playback an audio sample of “Mary Had a Little Lamb.”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaGDcxkN9co (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaGDcxkN9co#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on August 17, 2014, 07:53:44 AM
This Town Is Using The Ocean To Provide Heat To Low-Income Residents

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/07/24/3462774/town-heat-from-ocean/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2014/07/24/3462774/town-heat-from-ocean/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on August 17, 2014, 07:59:07 AM
600 million Apple devices have security flaws

Security expert and hacker Jonathan Zdziarski claimed at a tech conference Friday that hundreds of millions of Apple devices running iOS have backdoors installed, potentially giving governments and would-be snoopers access to user data. Stored GPS locations, browsing history, photo albums and more are accessible, allowing for a frightening amount of access to personal information says Zdziarski. RT's Lindsay France looks into the hacker's claims to learn more.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYLAsieItlM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYLAsieItlM#)

===

Black Hat hackers conference exposing flaws in everyday electronics

The “Internet of Things” is a hot topic at this year’s Black Hat cybesrsecurity conference in Las Vegas. With more household, security and even medical devices being connected to the internet, the threats posed by hackers and nefarious governments are growing. Web connected insulin pumps, home thermostats and other technologies are easily hacked and have had numerous security flaws exposed, potentially putting lives at risk, warn experts. Erin Ade, host of RT’s Boom Bust, is at the conference and has more.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-POzx_d-WA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-POzx_d-WA#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on August 17, 2014, 08:10:52 AM
Army looks at 3D printing warheads

3D printing may soon revolutionize warfare. The Army is working on a project to “print” warheads, modernizing the manufacturing process of the complex devices that have not dramatically changed since WWII. Allowing for intricate designs to control “detonation physics,” blasts radiuses and other aspects of the explosive capsules can be tailor-made for specific circumstances. RT’s Meghan Lopez takes a look at the innovative plans

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVWKOy7yvQE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVWKOy7yvQE#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 06, 2014, 01:03:52 PM
Ingenuity from a lack of support and resources has made Detroiter's use "Old School" technology work for new world problems...

http://bcove.me/u0khzhwg (http://bcove.me/u0khzhwg)
http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1659454159001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAACEbKtKE~,hMlwOmT8XTDrtff1uzYD3M5bENmR4RfZ&bctid=3770126782001 (http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1659454159001?bckey=AQ~~,AAAACEbKtKE~,hMlwOmT8XTDrtff1uzYD3M5bENmR4RfZ&bctid=3770126782001)
http://deadlinedetroit.com/articles/10321/how_broke_is_detroit_firefighters_use_pop_cans_for_emergency_alerts#.VAs6WcVdVvk (http://deadlinedetroit.com/articles/10321/how_broke_is_detroit_firefighters_use_pop_cans_for_emergency_alerts#.VAs6WcVdVvk)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:11:07 AM
You won't believe the military's new drones

Bird-like drones. Insect-like drones. Stealth drones. Invisible drones. The military's quest for the sneakiest, deadliest drones knows no bounds. They just acquired 36 Maveric drones, which look exactly like birds. They put in an order for Black Hornet drones, which are super small.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xH982QZeIGI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xH982QZeIGI#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:12:12 AM
Killer robots the subject of UN debate

Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (aka: killer robots) will be the subject of debate at the UN in Geneva this week. With the quickening pace of robotic advances, the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons decided it's time to begin addressing the potential implications. The body is tasked with finding the most dangerous weapons systems and regulating their use. RT's Sarah Firth visited a robotics convention in London to take a look at some of the latest robotics advances and find out more about their potential dangers.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDf_LeQgEOc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDf_LeQgEOc#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:13:16 AM
US military attempting to create moral robots

The US Department of Defense is working on creating artificial intelligence that will imbue our robots with a sense of morality. The project is being carried out by top researchers from Tufts, Brown, and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. It's being funded by the Office of Naval Research, a wing of the Department of Defense that mainly deals with R&D.

US military attempting to create moral robots (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVPuMcjPRQ0#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:14:24 AM
Clone army: Artist's 3D printable mask tricks facial recognition software

Biometric identification is becoming more prevalent and powerful, so artist Leo Selvaggio decided to take a novel approach to combat what he views as the growing surveillance state. Selvaggio created a 3D printable mask that is a photorealistic copy of his own face, allowing users to trick facial recognition software and conceal the wearer's identity. The idea for the project struck while the artist was living in Chicago, which has over 20,000 networked cameras accessible by police.

Clone army: Artist's 3D printable mask tricks facial recognition software (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eelvE4goUhw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:16:48 AM
DARPA close to creating memory brain implants

The White House's $100 million "Brain Initiative" is set to unveil the progress government researchers have made in restoring the memory of injured brains. Focused on soldiers who have lost recollection of certain events due to traumatic brain injuries, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, has been working on implants that allow for the restoration of memory. The research also has implications for those who suffer from Alzheimer's and other conditions.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_22TH9lIvk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_22TH9lIvk#)

===

DARPA creating USB memory stick for human brain

If ginkgo or memory apps aren’t working, then DARPA may have an alternative for you. The federally funded research center is developing an “implantable, closed-loop system” that may help restore memory. In simplified terms, the agency is creating a USB memory stick for the brain.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5Djhs7aBfY&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5Djhs7aBfY&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:17:47 AM
Mad scientists create acid-spitting ATM

An acid-spitting ATM is the latest creation by researchers at ETH Zurich University. Modeled after the bombardier beetle which sprays an acidic chemical mixture at attackers, the ATM would mix hydrogen peroxide with manganese dioxide if tampered with, spewing the mixture at the perp

Mad scientists create acid-spitting ATM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wwXlCfsDZ8#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:19:21 AM
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts off Cape Canaveral

The tenth Chinese AsiaSat satellite was launched on Sunday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The AsiaSat 6, developed by Hong Kong-based Asia Satellite Telecommunications (AsiaSat) Company, blasted off with the help of a SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pS-H6FTnFk&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pS-H6FTnFk&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:21:26 AM
Protesters: there's a fantastic new app for you

Technology has revolutionized the way people register dissent around the world. Facebook drove the Arab Spring; Twitter is so powerful that countries ban it. Now, a new app grants protesters a whole new tool to help not only organize, but vote on and discuss issues, helping masses of people stay on message in a democratic manner. It's called Loomio

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_DZY9bnh_U (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_DZY9bnh_U#)

===

New app helps you avoid everyone

Some would rather use their smartphones to try and avoid people instead of staying in touch with them. That's the idea behind Cloak, a new app that helps you to avoid the unsavory people in your life. Using the location data of ex partners, acquaintances or slovenly co-workers from Foursqaure and Instagram, the app lets you stay up-to-date about the whereabouts of those you would rather avoid.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ0AjOIWWyw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQ0AjOIWWyw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 16, 2014, 07:22:27 AM
SCARY Report On How Vulnerable Our Power Grid Is

"On March 12, The Wall Street Journal's energy reporter Rebecca Smith wrote an article highlighting the risk to the U.S. power grid if only nine of the country's 55,000 electric substations were to be knocked out by terrorists during a hot summer. Smith noted that, "The study by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission concluded that coordinated attacks in each of the nation's three separate electric systems could cause the entire power network to collapse, people familiar with the research said."

SCARY Report On How Vulnerable Our Power Grid Is (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LImfTwLCAuE#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 02, 2014, 10:16:20 AM
DARPA testing jetpack for soldiers

DARPA and Arizona State University are testing a jetpack for US troops, but it has at least one major drawback. The device will not allow soldiers to fly, instead increasing the ground speed of the wearer, allowing them to run a four minute mile.

DARPA testing jetpack for soldiers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlVo_i3jpbI&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)

===

How surveillance cameras will soon be reading lips

Ahmad Hassanat, a scientist at a University in Jordan, has created an automated lip-reading system with a success rate of 76%. Though he admits there are many hurdles to making the technology perfect, in our surveillance-obsessed society, it's only a matter of time - especially when you consider the CIA is already seeking out lip-reading services.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=22N2SSj1xp8&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22N2SSj1xp8&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)

===

Driverless Audi A7 to hit streets of California

California’s law allowing street trials of driverless vehicles goes into effect this week, with an autonomous Audi A7 having the honor of being the first vehicle to hit the road for testing. Researchers estimate that by 2025, manufacturers will be producing at least 230,000 autonomous vehicles yearly, with most of the major auto makers hoping to have publically available driverless vehicles by 2020

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUffGpswKrI&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUffGpswKrI&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)

===

Scientist predicts new human species will emerge in 30 years

In just over 30 years, a new human species will emerge on Earth, according to a researcher at the Global Brain Institute. Cadell Last claims that due to technological and societal changes, Homo sapiens will undergo changes to our biological clocks, life spans and physical characteristics comparable to the transition of apes to humans.

Scientist predicts new human species will emerge in 30 years (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbxNWpZdOd8&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 16, 2014, 10:56:26 AM
US stores old nukes...to fight off asteroid threats

The US government is stockpiling nuclear warhead components so that they can be used to destroy asteroids if need be, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office. A number of devices meant to be disassembled in 2015 will instead remain in storage, “pending a senior-level government evaluation of their use in planetary defense against earthbound asteroids.”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VH02C7W1Nu4&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VH02C7W1Nu4&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 19, 2014, 01:29:19 PM
Lockheed Martin claims nuclear fusion breakthrough

Lockheed Martin announced on Wednesday it has achieved a major breakthrough in developing a nuclear fusion reactor. Although the defense contractor claims it is developing a prototype small enough to fit on the back of a truck, some scientists are skeptical the company is actually on its way to harnessing the elusive energy source.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZaU5ZtDdY8&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZaU5ZtDdY8&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 05, 2014, 07:49:59 AM
Robots replacing human workers may leave millions out of job

Lowe’s is breaking ground by testing robots to help customers navigate their often massive stores and assist with purchases. Although no plans yet exist to implement the autonomous bots nationwide, some believe this is a big leap towards deeply integrating robotics into our daily lives, which experts believe will happen by 2025. RT’s Sam Sacks takes a look at what impact this may have on the human workforce.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MLvHvITvg&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MLvHvITvg&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on November 05, 2014, 04:20:20 PM
Robots replacing human workers may leave millions out of job

Lowe’s is breaking ground by testing robots to help customers navigate their often massive stores and assist with purchases. Although no plans yet exist to implement the autonomous bots nationwide, some believe this is a big leap towards deeply integrating robotics into our daily lives, which experts believe will happen by 2025. RT’s Sam Sacks takes a look at what impact this may have on the human workforce.
[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MLvHvITvg&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ]www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MLvHvITvg&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5MLvHvITvg&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#[/url])


I wonder how much a robot buys from Lowes on an annual basis ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 08, 2014, 07:15:12 AM
I wonder how much a robot buys from Lowes on an annual basis ;) ;) ;)

.......or how much they can shoplift?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 12, 2014, 08:46:17 PM
China’s military outpacing US technology

The Pentagon is warning that China’s investments in its own military are threatening the US’ superiority. Although the US spends vastly more on its armed forces than all other nations, China is rapidly catching up with new technologies and advanced hardware.

China’s military outpacing US technology (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3s5hupCoGQ4&list=UUczrL-2b-gYK3l4yDld4XlQ#)

There's a good chance this story is a weak attempt to probe for information about US capabilities.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 03, 2015, 10:13:43 AM
Raspberry Pi: An Entry-Level Computer for $35
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/raspberry-pi-entry-level-computer-35/story?id=28667538 (http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/raspberry-pi-entry-level-computer-35/story?id=28667538)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 06, 2015, 10:03:57 PM
Navy’s new human-like robot could replace firefighters
(This will excite the Monroe City Council)

Human sailors are proving to be passé at the US Navy's Tech Expo in Washington, DC. Unmanned vehicles, robotics and high-powered weapons are on display, showing the future of warfare.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzxvxgvpdGY (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzxvxgvpdGY#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 06, 2015, 10:09:04 PM
Different pics on the links:

Futuristic Japanese Hotel Staffed Entirely by Robots
All the staff members at the Henn na Hotel (aka 'strange hotel' in English) aren't actually living.

Eager for a glimpse into the future, where humans and robots co-exist? If so, a new hotel in Japan might be just the thing.
Because all the staff members at the Henn na Hotel (aka "strange hotel" in English) aren't actually living.
Japan Times reports that the futuristic hotel is scheduled to open July 17 at the Huis Ten Bosch theme park, which used life-sized replicas of old Dutch buildings to re-create The Netherlands in Japan.
The robot experience starts when you first step foot into the hotel. Robots will help you with your bags, as well as manage the front desk and other hotel services — even clean your room for you.
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476347,00.asp (http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476347,00.asp)

===

Bellhop bots? This Japanese hotel will be run by robots
Nothing says hotel hospitality like being greeted by a smiling robot. Checking into Hen-na Hotel in Japan means you'll be surrounded in robots eager to help make your vacation hassle-free and memorable.
http://www.cnet.com/news/bellhop-bots-japanese-hotel-run-entirely-by-robots/ (http://www.cnet.com/news/bellhop-bots-japanese-hotel-run-entirely-by-robots/)

===

Bleep blorp: New Japanese hotel to be staffed by robots

The robot revolution may be gentler than we thought.

We're not sure if the robotic staff at a planned hotel in Japan will be tucking guests into their beds at night, but they'll be performing plenty of other traditional hospitality tasks.

Huis Ten Bosch, a theme park modeled after the Netherlands in Japan's Nagasaki Prefecture, has announced plans to open a hotel with robot staff and other advanced technologies.

The hotel will be called Henn-na Hotel, which translates as Strange Hotel.
http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/04/travel/japan-hotel-robots/ (http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/04/travel/japan-hotel-robots/)

===

Robot Receptionists are Real and Really Real-Looking Too

We've always joked that with the advent of mobile apps in hotels, guests will no longer need human interaction to make their room service request, pull up their car from valet or ask for more towels from housekeeping. But maybe we should be more concerned about hotel robots eradicating the human experience?

A newly announced hotel in Japan's Netherlands-like Huis Ten Bosch theme park will be staffed with robots at the reception desk. And not the Botlr kind of robot but robots that have a human likeness to them and who can engage in "intelligent conversation" with guests. #CREEPY. There will be other "service and porter" robots similar to Botlr who will do the menial tasks like cleaning and presumably bringing up that toothbrush you forgot. But let's be real, they won't be able to make a bed now, will they?
http://www.hotelchatter.com/story/2015/2/5/102355/7238/hotels/Robot_Receptionists_are_Real_and_Really_Real-Looking_Too (http://www.hotelchatter.com/story/2015/2/5/102355/7238/hotels/Robot_Receptionists_are_Real_and_Really_Real-Looking_Too)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 08, 2015, 05:24:35 PM
The Robots Are All About That Job

Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, the largest bank in Japan, has plans to build an army of ‘emotional robots’ to create a robot workforce revolution to replace the dwindling numbers of human labor in the country.

The robot, named NAO by its creators at Aldebaran Robotics, will be two feet tall (fifty-eight centimeters), have the ability to speak nineteen languages but most importantly will be able to pick up on and resound to human speech patters and emotions. The robots can listen to questions, work late night hours for twenty-four hour banking and more.

Some have widely regarded this as a bad move, including the CEO of Tesla Motors and SpaceX Elon Musk who has said that there is a danger of super intelligent robots becoming a pandora’s box that we can’t control. There is also a danger that a larger robot workforce will lead to less human interaction and an even larger desensitized population than we already have. The danger that the concept and robots will eventually end up replacing the human workforce in countries that don’t have a shortage of human workers is a real possibility.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MolHxzheOHE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MolHxzheOHE#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 09, 2015, 04:24:08 PM
Be Careful What You Say Around Your Samsung Smart TV
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp (http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 11, 2015, 11:59:23 AM
Scientists using sunlight to make liquid fuel

Daniel Nocera became an instant celebrity in renewable energy circles in 2011 when he invented the artificial leaf.

More an idea than an actual leaf, the Harvard professor came up with a way to harness sunlight with silicon to split water into oxygen and hydrogen. From there, it was theorized, it was just a step further to create hydrogen fuel cells.

It seemed too good to be true. Finally, someone had found a way to use the power of the sun to produce a clean fuel source. But there was a slight problem. The infrastructure for a hydrogen-fueled economy didn't exist then and, to this day, still is nowhere close to becoming a reality.

So, Nocera went back to the drawing board.

Taking his artificial leaf idea, he teamed up with several other researchers at Harvard including Jeffery Way and Pamela Silver. They took the hydrogen from the photovoltaic cells of the artificial leaf and fed it to the soil bacterium Ralstonia eutropha. The microbe combined the hydrogen with carbon dioxide from another source and, for the first time, produced liquid fuel.

"This is sort of the next step moving beyond hydrogen to make a fuel that is integratable with our current infrastructure," Nocera, a co-author on a study that appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday, told CBS News.

"I can't convince an entire society to change over their infrastructure to use hydrogen," he said. "Instead of fighting it, this is sort of going with the flow to so speak."

But while thrilled with his team's discovery, Nocera admitted they still face a challenge of improving the efficiency of the process so that fuel could be produced commercially. Currently, they are only able to convert 1 percent of the sunlight into liquid fuel, which falls far short of the 10 percent efficiency needed to establish a viable, sustainable solar fuel industry.

Nocera is part of a band of scientists trying to crack the nut that is solar fuels.

If successful, they would produce a fuel that gives the United States energy independence, helps combat global warming by finding a replacement for fossil fuels and avoids the concerns of biofuels, which often compete with food for land.

Among those investing heavily in solar fuel technology is the Department of Energy, which is spending $1.22 million over five years on the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis. Since 2010, the center has been the nation's largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology.

But it was another DOE program that helped inspire the latest breakthrough. Called the electrofuels program at the DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency, it is tasked with using microorganisms to create liquid fuel for transportation.

Out of the program came the microbe used in the latest research to produce liquid fuel.

"The idea was, could you take a bug like Ralstonia eutropha and mess around with its guts, do a bunch of genetic engineering so that bug will take hydrogen, carbon dioxide and make liquid fuel," said Eric J. Toone, who founded the electrofuels program but is now the director of the Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative.

More  here:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/scientists-using-sunlight-to-make-liquid-fuel/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/scientists-using-sunlight-to-make-liquid-fuel/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on February 11, 2015, 12:47:04 PM
Be Careful What You Say Around Your Samsung Smart TV
[url]http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp[/url] ([url]http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp[/url])


Our son just bought one of these...  he read the manual and was aware of how it did things so no real problem.  I guess the key is that the consumer is 'aware' of what is going on 'behind the scenes'!!!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 11, 2015, 06:16:46 PM
I can hear you…. Samsung warns customers to not discuss private matters near ‘smart’ TV sets

Samsung is warning owners of its SmartTVs to not discuss personal matters when within range of the device’s microphone, as the TV is constantly recording audio and sending it to a third-party for analysis. Though part of a seemingly benign process meant to allow customers to command their TV with voice recognition software, the explicit warning from the company has many consumer advocates up in arms

www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-x1b6pmZMw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-x1b6pmZMw#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 11, 2015, 06:18:06 PM
I’ve got my eyes on you… Wi-Fi-enabled nanny cams suffer growing number of hacks

Cases of Wi-Fi-connected nanny cams being hacked by strangers have been popping up across the US. Along with lone hackers, dedicated websites have surfaced allowing people to hack into nanny cams and stream the footage in their own privacy. RT’s Manila Chan reports on a growing home security threat – and what you can do to protect yourself and family.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hr46qX1PjAM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hr46qX1PjAM#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 14, 2015, 02:00:49 PM
The microwave with 'X-ray' vision: Infrared cameras show the temperature of food while it cooks to tell you when it's done
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2952213/Heat-map-microwave-tells-meal-Infrared-cameras-temperature-food-LCD-screen.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2952213/Heat-map-microwave-tells-meal-Infrared-cameras-temperature-food-LCD-screen.html)

HEAT MAP Microwave- a NEW invention

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptkzzNaZb7U (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptkzzNaZb7U#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 14, 2015, 02:02:38 PM
Old but I just found it:

24 EASY Hi-Tech Halloween Costumes for 2014

www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOQws77j_6c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOQws77j_6c#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on February 14, 2015, 04:24:52 PM
Be Careful What You Say Around Your Samsung Smart TV
[url]http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp[/url] ([url]http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2476476,00.asp[/url])


Just recently bought one before hearing about this story.  Brother, did my daughters ever give me crap over it.  So in defiance, when they are there I stand in front of the TV and tell stories about stuff they did as teenagers.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 17, 2015, 03:33:12 PM
Is Apple building an iCar?
http://www.vox.com/2015/2/16/8043673/apple-car-icar (http://www.vox.com/2015/2/16/8043673/apple-car-icar)

===

Apple Gears Up to Challenge Tesla in Electric Cars
IPhone Maker Has 100s Working on Design of a Minivan Like Vehicle
http://www.wsj.com/articles/apples-titan-car-project-to-challenge-tesla-1423868072 (http://www.wsj.com/articles/apples-titan-car-project-to-challenge-tesla-1423868072)

===

The rumor mill has shifted into high gear about Apple developing an electric car to take on Tesla and maybe even Google...
http://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckjones/2015/02/14/hitting-the-brakes-on-apples-electric-car/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckjones/2015/02/14/hitting-the-brakes-on-apples-electric-car/)

===

Here's why I think news of an Apple Car is suddenly pouring out
http://www.businessinsider.com/munster-heres-why-i-think-news-of-an-apple-car-is-suddenly-pouring-out-2015-2 (http://www.businessinsider.com/munster-heres-why-i-think-news-of-an-apple-car-is-suddenly-pouring-out-2015-2)

===

Apple's secret car project spotted in Silicon Valley while Tesla poaches its talents
http://www.inferse.com/22704/apples-secret-car-project-spotted-silicon-valley-tesla-poaches-talents/ (http://www.inferse.com/22704/apples-secret-car-project-spotted-silicon-valley-tesla-poaches-talents/)

===

One radical theory behind Apple’s sudden interest in cars
http://qz.com/344760/one-radical-theory-behind-apples-sudden-interest-in-cars/ (http://qz.com/344760/one-radical-theory-behind-apples-sudden-interest-in-cars/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 17, 2015, 03:34:49 PM
Zooming contact lenses enlarge at a wink

A contact lens with a built in zoom that the wearer can switch at will between regular and telescopic vision could mean the end to dwindling independence for those with deteriorating eyesight, researchers suggested today. The rigid lens covers the majority of the front surface of the eye, including both the whites and the pupil, and contains an array of tiny aluminum mirrors that together can enlarge the world by 2.8x. Winking flips the view between regular and magnified.
http://www.slashgear.com/zooming-contact-lenses-enlarge-at-a-wink-13369050/ (http://www.slashgear.com/zooming-contact-lenses-enlarge-at-a-wink-13369050/)

===

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/computing/Now-contact-lenses-that-allow-you-to-zoom-in-and-zoom-out/articleshow/46261723.cms (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/computing/Now-contact-lenses-that-allow-you-to-zoom-in-and-zoom-out/articleshow/46261723.cms)
Title: Apple, Hulu, Etsy: How famous tech companies got their names
Post by: BigRedDog on February 17, 2015, 05:31:27 PM
I've often wondered 'how and why' some of the tech companies go their name!!!  Some make sense and others I still kind of wonder about ;) ;) ;)

http://www.csmonitor.com/Innovation/2014/0519/Apple-Hulu-Etsy-How-famous-tech-companies-got-their-names/Google (http://www.csmonitor.com/Innovation/2014/0519/Apple-Hulu-Etsy-How-famous-tech-companies-got-their-names/Google)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 21, 2015, 12:47:04 AM
Scientists have discovered nature’s newest strongest material

It’s as strong as steel and tough as a bulletproof vest, capable of withstanding the same amount of pressure it takes to turn carbon into a diamond. Scientists have discovered nature’s newest strongest material, and it comes from … a sea snail.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/02/18/scientists-have-discovered-natures-newest-strongest-material-and-it-comes-from-a-sea-snail/ (http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/02/18/scientists-have-discovered-natures-newest-strongest-material-and-it-comes-from-a-sea-snail/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 21, 2015, 12:49:10 AM
Until Superfish fix, Lenovo devices can't be trusted for secure work
http://www.zdnet.com/article/superfish-stop-using-your-lenovo-laptop-now/ (http://www.zdnet.com/article/superfish-stop-using-your-lenovo-laptop-now/)

===

New Lenovo PCs shipped with factory-installed adware
http://www.engadget.com/2015/02/19/lenovo-superfish-adware-preinstalled/ (http://www.engadget.com/2015/02/19/lenovo-superfish-adware-preinstalled/)

===

Some Lenovo laptops shipped with preinstalled malware
http://mashable.com/2015/02/19/superfish-lenovo/ (http://mashable.com/2015/02/19/superfish-lenovo/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 21, 2015, 12:50:22 AM
12 causes of Apocalypses make on a new scientific list

AI and robots might be the leading apocalypse threat. “Artificial Intelligence has goals, it has plans and that’s the problem,” says with Stuart Armstrong of the Future of Humanity Institute on what will be the calamity that brings about the Apocalypse. Armstrong speaks with RT’s Ben Swann about new research done at Oxford University that calculates the probability of 12 different Apocalypses.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PwvXQfrxAE (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PwvXQfrxAE#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 02, 2015, 02:12:30 AM
'Monstrous' black hole leaves scientists puzzled

Researchers in China are saying they have discovered a massive black hole 12 billion times the size of our own sun. But scientists are at a loss because the black hole seems much younger than it should be. RT’s Ameera David has more on the strange astral phenomenon.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=aia0BVtUidc (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aia0BVtUidc#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 02, 2015, 02:14:24 AM
Huawei showcases Huawei Watch and wearables at MWC
Chinese smartphone maker Huawei has unveiled its first smartwatch and two new wearable devices at MWC in Barcelona


Huawei has revealed its first smartwatch, the Huawei Watch, during Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona.

The watch features an 1.4-inch circular display with scratch-proof sapphire crystal lens, and will run Android Wear.

Users will be able to check emails, send and receive texts and monitor the number of calories burned and distance travel during their day.

The Huawei Watch is expected to go on sale in June, some months after the Apple Watch. Rivals LG also showcased their smartwatch, the LG Watch Urbane, at MWC on Sunday.

The Chinese company also showcased two new wearables - the TalkBand B2 and TalkBand N1 designed for the business executive on the run.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/mwc/11440736/Huawei-showcases-Huawei-Watch-and-wearables-at-MWC.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/mwc/11440736/Huawei-showcases-Huawei-Watch-and-wearables-at-MWC.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 02, 2015, 02:15:23 AM
Google Wants To Help You Buy Solar Panels For Your House. Seriously.
If you to want to install solar panels on your roof but haven’t yet because it’s too expensive, Google really wants to help.
The search giant, valued at $370 billion, is once again boosting its investment in SolarCity’s residential solar power model by $300 million, both companies announced Thursday. Combined with a new financing structure from SolarCity, the companies say this will result in a new fund worth $750 million to help install distributed rooftop solar on homes across the country.
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/02/26/3627172/google-solarcity-big-solar-fund/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/02/26/3627172/google-solarcity-big-solar-fund/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 02, 2015, 02:21:40 AM
Mummy Found Hiding Inside Ancient Buddha Statue

A Chinese statue of a sitting Buddha has revealed a hidden surprise: Inside, scientists found the mummified remains of a monk who lived nearly 1,000 years ago.
http://www.livescience.com/49909-buddha-statue-holds-mummy.html (http://www.livescience.com/49909-buddha-statue-holds-mummy.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 02, 2015, 02:22:59 AM
PowerSpy: The Android App That Tracks Your Location By Battery Use Alone

Are you wary of giving apps permission to use GPS to locate your phone? Well, they may know where you are anyway by measuring small changes in your battery power according to a new study from Stanford University and researchers working for defense contractor Rafael.

A mobile phone uses more battery power the further away it is from a cellular base and the more obstacles there are blocking the signal as it tries to connect. The researchers designed an Android app to measure these changes in battery use which over time allowed them to locate phones with up to 90 percent accuracy.

The study used an app called PowerSpy but this battery use data can be gleaned from more than 179 apps available on the Google Play store including such seemingly innocent games like Angry Birds. The scary part is that unlike GPS and Wi-Fi, apps do not need to ask the user's permission to access battery use data.
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/34812/20150223/gps-android-stanford-rafael-powerspy.htm (http://www.techtimes.com/articles/34812/20150223/gps-android-stanford-rafael-powerspy.htm)
Title: Wine bottle tree replaced with wind catching tree
Post by: Professor H on March 08, 2015, 04:17:03 PM

I hear the wine bottle tree is being replaced... 

(http://www.offgridworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/wind-tree-wind-turbine-3100-watt-wind-turbine.jpg)
http://www.geek.com/science/new-wind-turbine-looks-like-a-tree-generates-power-silently-1612693/ (http://www.geek.com/science/new-wind-turbine-looks-like-a-tree-generates-power-silently-1612693/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on March 08, 2015, 04:22:44 PM
I'd puke, then go buy a cannon. 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 08, 2015, 04:49:23 PM
Just what you need....  next door.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on March 08, 2015, 06:55:21 PM
Believe it or not, I do get entertainment value out if it that my elderly neighbor who can barely walk has the gumption to destroy their Appalachian decorations small pieces at a time.  She sure is a great neighbor and probably would come light the fuse on a cannon aimed directly at it.

It's so quite and peaceful back here that it adds a bit more fun to an otherwise tranquil place.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on March 08, 2015, 08:47:08 PM
I hear the wine bottle tree is being replaced... 

([url]http://www.offgridworld.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/wind-tree-wind-turbine-3100-watt-wind-turbine.jpg[/url])
[url]http://www.geek.com/science/new-wind-turbine-looks-like-a-tree-generates-power-silently-1612693/[/url] ([url]http://www.geek.com/science/new-wind-turbine-looks-like-a-tree-generates-power-silently-1612693/[/url])



Each Wind Tree is expected to cost €29,500 (US$36,500), but could pay for itself in a few years.

Really? At the $200 a month I pay it would take 15 years to pay for itself if it lasted that long.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 08, 2015, 09:54:06 PM
....and it's frigg'in fugly but would look good in Fuzz' front yard me thinks.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on March 08, 2015, 10:13:08 PM
Each Wind Tree is expected to cost €29,500 (US$36,500), but could pay for itself in a few years.

Really? At the $200 a month I pay it would take 15 years to pay for itself if it lasted that long.
I think they figure you selling the excess back to DTE... 

Also, there may still be "Green" tax credits out there.

Can't see anyone investing in one - but that's the options.

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 08, 2015, 10:17:31 PM
There is Prof.  The energy tax credit got extended again for high efficiency heating and cooling purchases.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on March 09, 2015, 12:00:44 AM
There is Prof.  The energy tax credit got extended again for high efficiency heating and cooling purchases.
Ooh - just put one in this past year... It would be nice to get something back.   I pay way more than enough in taxes!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 09, 2015, 05:59:08 PM
It's only 300 bucks though.  Inflation got ahold of the 500.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 10, 2015, 09:55:46 PM
China’s indestructible ‘King Kong’ smartphone revealed

Shockproof, waterproof and able to smash a walnut without harm, Hisense’s “King Kong” smartphone was unveiled at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain on Thursday. Portraying the device as an alternative to fragile iPhones and other devices, company representatives slammed King Kong on the ground, submerged it in water and used it as an axe on a watermelon.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=32lKnIB_k08 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32lKnIB_k08#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 10, 2015, 09:57:41 PM
New York Just Showed Every Other State How to Do Solar Right

New York wants to get serious about solar power. The state has a goal to cut its greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, and it's already among the nation's solar leaders. New York ranks ninth overall for total installed solar, and in 2013 alone it added enough to power more than 10,000 homes.

While that's great news for solar companies and environmentalists, it's a bit of a problem for electric utilities. Until recently, the business model of electric companies hadn't changed much since it was created a century ago. (The country's first electric grid was strung up by Thomas Edison in Manhattan's Lower East Side in the 1880s, and some parts of it continued to operate into the 2000s.) Utilities have depended on a steady growth in demand to stay ahead of the massive investments required to build power plants and the electric grid. But now, that tradition is crumbling—thanks to the crazy growth of rooftop solar and other alternative energy sources and some big advances in energy efficiency that have caused the overall demand for electricity to stop growing. Meanwhile, utilities in New York are also required to buy the excess power from solar buildings that produce more than they need—a policy called "net metering".

But here's the thing: Even the most ardent climate hawks agree that we can't afford for utilities to go out of business altogether. Someone needs to maintain and manage the grid. Hardly any solar homes are actually "off the grid," since they still depend on power lines to soak up their excess electricity during sunny afternoons and deliver power at night. In fact, net metering is a key factor in making solar economically viable to homeowners.

The question of how to aggressively slash carbon emissions without completely undermining the power sector (and simultaneously raising the risk of blackouts and skyrocketing electric bills) is one of the big existential questions that climate-savvy lawmakers are now trying to figure out. And last week in New York, they took a huge step forward.

Under a new order from the state's Public Service Commission, utility companies will soon be barred from owning "distributed" power systems—that means rooftop solar, small wind turbines, and basically anything else that isn't a big power plant. (There are some rare exceptions built into the order, notably for giant low-income apartment buildings in New York City that small solar companies aren't well-equipped to serve.)

"By restricting utilities from owning local power generation and other energy resources, customers will benefit from a more competitive market, with utilities working and partnering with other companies and service providers," the commission said in a statement.

The move is part of a larger package of energy reforms in the state, aimed at setting up the kind of futuristic power system that experts think will be needed to combat global warming. The first step came in 2007, when the state adopted "decoupling," a market design in which a utility's revenue is based not on how much power it sells, but on how many customers it serves. (Remember that in most states utilities have their income stream heavily regulated by the state in exchange for having a monopoly.) That change removed the incentive for utilities to actively block rooftop solar and energy-saving technology, because lost sales no longer translate to lost income. But because utilities could still make money by recouping the cost of big infrastructure projects through increases to their customers' bills, they had an incentive to build expensive stuff like power plants and big transmission hubs even if demand could be better met with efficiency and renewables.

Now, under New York's most recent reform, a utility's revenue will instead be based on how efficiently and effectively it distributes power, so-called "performance-based rates." This, finally, provides the incentive utilities need to make decisions that jibe with the state's climate goals, because it will be to their advantage to make use of distributed energy systems.
More here:
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/03/solar-just-had-huge-win-new-york (http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/03/solar-just-had-huge-win-new-york)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: sammy on March 10, 2015, 10:32:12 PM
How do you think about this personally, apart from mother jones?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 10, 2015, 11:25:18 PM
How do you think about this personally, apart from mother jones?
I'm in favor of alternative energy. How about you?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 11, 2015, 04:18:45 AM
Scientists reconsider whether methane-based life could exist in solar system

www.youtube.com/watch?v=llD_0ZhDNz4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llD_0ZhDNz4#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 11, 2015, 04:19:30 AM
Pluto could receive planet status once more

After its downgrade in 2006, a debate over whether Pluto is a planet or not raged in the science community. Now, scientists at NASA are planning a flyby of the dwarf planet, in a journey which has been planned for this summer and which should settle the debate of whether the celestial body should attain its former planetary status once more.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNoXam9TKJA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNoXam9TKJA#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 11, 2015, 10:58:19 PM
This Student’s Faucet Design Saves Water By Creating Breathtaking Patterns

(http://higherperspective.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/420632306873536512.jpg)

Read more at http://higherperspective.com/2015/03/faucet.html#DzR73IJAvApqUl5W.99 (http://higherperspective.com/2015/03/faucet.html#DzR73IJAvApqUl5W.99)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 13, 2015, 12:20:51 PM
Scientists invented Molecule-making machine to improve synthetic drugs
http://www.thehoopsnews.com/2015/03/13/3831/scientists-invented-molecule-making-machine-to-improve-synthetic-drugs/ (http://www.thehoopsnews.com/2015/03/13/3831/scientists-invented-molecule-making-machine-to-improve-synthetic-drugs/)

===

A Plant-based ‘Molecule-making Machine’ solved many Issues
http://www.zinereport.com/2971_a-plant-based-molecule-making-machine-solved-many-issues/ (http://www.zinereport.com/2971_a-plant-based-molecule-making-machine-solved-many-issues/)

===

New machine that can literally build molecules aims to revolutionize chemistry
http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/new-machine-that-can-literally-build-molecules-aims-to-revolutionize-chemistry/ (http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/new-machine-that-can-literally-build-molecules-aims-to-revolutionize-chemistry/)

===

3-D printer for small molecules opens access to customized chemistry
http://phys.org/news/2015-03-d-printer-small-molecules-access.html (http://phys.org/news/2015-03-d-printer-small-molecules-access.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 13, 2015, 12:22:12 PM
How you might be mining Bitcoin for someone else

Bittorrent client, uTorrent, has over 100 million users. Many of them noticed recently that their computers were massively slowed down, and that there was a strange "e" in their menu bars. Turns out they had installed a program called "Epic Scale," without realizing it, through uTorrent. Epic Scale was using their computers to mine for Bitcoin.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2zOOq0h36s (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2zOOq0h36s#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: nails on March 13, 2015, 01:03:52 PM
This Student’s Faucet Design Saves Water By Creating Breathtaking Patterns

([url]http://higherperspective.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/420632306873536512.jpg[/url])

Read more at [url]http://higherperspective.com/2015/03/faucet.html#DzR73IJAvApqUl5W.99[/url] ([url]http://higherperspective.com/2015/03/faucet.html#DzR73IJAvApqUl5W.99[/url])


Maybe I'm too skeptical, but I can't believe this flow design is possible. The water jets can't make this curved cylinder shape.  Especially without drops going outside the column.
I believe this is just someone's Dream on a computer.


Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on March 13, 2015, 01:13:22 PM
Maybe I'm too skeptical, but I can't believe this flow design is possible. The water jets can't make this curved cylinder shape.  Especially without drops going outside the column.
I believe this is just someone's Dream on a computer.

it looks like the old 'Chinese finger trap'...

or a heart stent!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 13, 2015, 05:38:54 PM
Yes, Asus cheated: The FCC fined the router maker last year

A number of Asus products—routers, tablets, and wireless extenders—violated FCC interference rules, and the company quietly paid a $240,000 fine last year. The company also settled a very nasty lawsuit in which Netgear accused Asus of unfair competition around the same time.

The last time we reported on Netgear's suit, a federal judge had refused Asus’s request to dismiss the case. Netgear accused Asus of submitting false test results to the FCC in an effort to gain an unfair competitive advantage. And that was the last we heard about the case—until today.

As it turns out, Netgear and Asus arrived at a settlement in August 2014, the terms of which were not disclosed. Today, Netgear brought to my attention the fact that Asus had also settled with the FCC in August, admitting that it violated the agency’s regulations and paying a $240,000 civil fine.

More here:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2895908/yes-asus-cheated-the-fcc-fined-the-router-maker-last-year.html#tk.nl_pcwbest (http://www.pcworld.com/article/2895908/yes-asus-cheated-the-fcc-fined-the-router-maker-last-year.html#tk.nl_pcwbest)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2015, 12:57:44 AM
NYPD gunshot tracking system makes New Yorkers feel uneasy
(I think it's a great idea!)

The New York Police Department is looking to expand a new gunfire tracking system, known as ShotSpotter, which uses sensitive microphones to track gunfire throughout the city – a statistic which is often underreported. RT’s Marina Portnaya takes a look at the new technology and how many advocates are concerned that the system might be a violations of privacy for city dwellers.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXWAzvCvc7w (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXWAzvCvc7w#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2015, 01:00:27 AM
New processing technology converts packing peanuts to battery components

(http://cdn.phys.org/newman/gfx/news/2015/newprocessin.jpg)
This schematic depicts a process for converting waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that outperform conventional graphite electrodes, representing an environmentally friendly approach to reuse the waste

Researchers have shown how to convert waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that outperform conventional graphite electrodes, representing an environmentally friendly approach to reuse the waste.

Batteries have two electrodes, called an anode and a cathode. The anodes in most of today's lithium-ion batteries are made of graphite. Lithium ions are contained in a liquid called an electrolyte, and these ions are stored in the anode during recharging. Now, researchers at Purdue University have shown how to manufacture carbon-nanoparticle and microsheet anodes from polystyrene and starch-based packing peanuts, respectively.

More here:
http://phys.org/news/2015-03-technology-peanuts-battery-components.html (http://phys.org/news/2015-03-technology-peanuts-battery-components.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2015, 01:02:39 AM
'Defective' Graphene Could Filter Water, Improve Fuel Cells

To say graphene is a material with a lot of promise might be the understatement of the decade. The atom-thin sheet of carbon is stronger than steel, more conductive than copper, and has several other fantastic qualities — but many of them require perfect, unbroken sheets of the stuff, which scientists still struggle to create reliably. But even "defective" graphene can excel in certain situations, researchers have discovered.

Tiny imperfections in the graphene sheet may reduce its strength, but if they're the right size, they also act as pores through which particles can pass — particles as small as protons or as large as salts and water pollutants. The researchers examined various defect sizes and the mechanism behind how each transmitted particles.

(http://media2.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2015_12/935491/1_04b1e0fc06f4b707aa8213afcb20b8ab.nbcnews-ux-480-320.jpg)
Computer model of a proton-compatible gap. The colors represent different kinds of atoms: grey, carbon; red, oxygen; white, hydrogen.

More here:
http://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/defective-graphene-could-filter-water-improve-fuel-cells-n325236 (http://www.nbcnews.com/science/science-news/defective-graphene-could-filter-water-improve-fuel-cells-n325236)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 27, 2015, 01:03:29 AM
‘Matrix’ fibers used to connect brain with computers

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created new fibers that might be capable of connecting the brain to computers, in the vein of sci-fi film “The Matrix.” RT’s Alexey Yaroshevsky takes a look at this new discovery and how researchers are planning to implement it in the near future.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejnICyCkz0Q (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejnICyCkz0Q#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology - Firefighting with sound
Post by: Professor H on March 28, 2015, 10:24:59 AM

Always interested in new firefighting technology - this is very interesting...


www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPVQMZ4ikvM&feature=youtu.be (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPVQMZ4ikvM&feature=youtu.be#)


==========================================
Extinguish Fire Without Water? These Guys Did It With Sound [Video]
By Nicole Arce,   Tech Times | March 27, 8:56 AMSHARE(3 )TWEET(1 ) 0 COMMENTS
Sound WaveSeth Roberthson, 23, and Viet Tran, 28, have invented a new device that generates low-frequency sound waves to put out fires. Pretty soon, this new invention could replace the chemical-producing fire extinguisher in your kitchen, but at least one fire department is willing to test the device on building fires.
(Photo : George Mason University | YouTube)

A pair of graduating engineering students at George Mason University has invented a new device that can put out fires using sound waves.

That's right. No water, no foam. Only a deep, bass rumble that is similar to the thud-thumping you hear in hip hop and rap songs.

Electrical engineering major Seth Robertson teamed up with computer engineering student Viet Tran to develop a new device that could potentially revolutionize the firefighting industry. The device was borne out of a senior research project that took a year of trial-and-error and their own money amounting to $600 to test and complete.

The result is a 20-kilogram device that uses low-frequency sound waves in the range of 30 to 60 hertz that can effectively put out a fire. At first, that was not what the students had in mind. They tried placing a pan filled with a fire fueled by rubbing alcohol next to a subwoofer blaring out music, but nothing happened as they realized the frequencies in music are inconsistent.

Then they tried experimenting with ultra-high frequencies ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 hertz, but all the sound waves did was get the flames vibrating. The sweet spot, they discovered, is in the low range of 30 to 60 hertz, where the sound waves, which the students say are also pressure waves, can keep the oxygen away from the flame long enough to eventually put out the flame.

To set up the device, the students rolled a cardboard cylinder and cut out a large hole at one end to serve as the collimator, or the device that narrows the sound waves down to a single direction. They connected the collimator to a frequency generator, a small amplifier, and a power source, and the result is a fire extinguisher that uses sound waves instead of water or toxic chemicals.

As Tran tells the Washington Post, the low-frequency sound waves "separate the oxygen [which keeps the fire burning] from the fuel. The pressure wave is going back and forth, and that agitates where the air is. That specific space is enough to keep the fire from reigniting." In other words, as the sound waves move through the air, they displace the oxygen that feeds the flame, thus extinguishing the fire.

"I honestly didn't think it would work as well as it did," Tran says.

The students initially intended their invention for putting out small kitchen fires, but officials at a fire department have already volunteered to test it in putting out larger building fires. Eventually, the students believe the device can be used for other purposes, such as in extinguishing fires in large confined spaces or wider open areas, such as forest fires.

However, they say they still need to do a lot more testing to see if their device can put out fires from different combustibles, such as wood, paper, metal, or electric wires.

The project was inspired by a 2012 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) project that successfully put out a fire using a large machine that generated sound. However, DARPA admitted it could not find a practical purpose for the project because of the bulky equipment, a fact that the students capitalized on to develop something that could eventually get to market.

Check out the video shown for a demonstration of how sound waves can effectively put out an alcohol-fueled fire.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42625/20150327/extinguish-fire-without-water-these-guys-did-it-with-sound-video.htm (http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42625/20150327/extinguish-fire-without-water-these-guys-did-it-with-sound-video.htm)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on March 28, 2015, 02:25:24 PM
Humm, that was very interesting.....never would have phantomed that sound waves could do that.....I guess it's all about oxygen displacement.

It will probably be nixed though.....some Democrat will find out the kids are Republicans and attack their personal integrity, or the Republicans will have a friend (Lobbyist) that can steal the technology and go into mass production immediately while getting a break on taxes.

Wrong thread, but our system is so broken that it can't be repaired.......it's seriously time to restart from scratch.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 29, 2015, 01:20:12 AM
Researchers Use Graphene To Make 'Square' Ice Crystals Not Found In Nature
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42495/20150327/researchers-use-graphene-to-make-square-ice-crystals-not-found-in-nature.htm (http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42495/20150327/researchers-use-graphene-to-make-square-ice-crystals-not-found-in-nature.htm)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 29, 2015, 01:21:36 AM
Tesla makes it 'impossible' to accidentally run out of juice

The electric-car maker's next software update for its vehicles will warn drivers when they get too far from charging stations.
http://www.cnet.com/news/tesla-makes-it-impossible-to-accidentally-run-out-of-juice/ (http://www.cnet.com/news/tesla-makes-it-impossible-to-accidentally-run-out-of-juice/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on March 29, 2015, 11:11:14 AM
Humm, that was very interesting.....never would have phantomed that sound waves could do that.....I guess it's all about oxygen displacement.

It will probably be nixed though.....some Democrat will find out the kids are Republicans and attack their personal integrity, or the Republicans will have a friend (Lobbyist) that can steal the technology and go into mass production immediately while getting a break on taxes.

Wrong thread, but our system is so broken that it can't be repaired.......it's seriously time to restart from scratch.

Would like to check out a re-creation - except I can't see burning any good scotch  (alcohol) maybe some 151 rum?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 29, 2015, 12:40:36 PM
Actually, it looked pretty simple.  Looked to be a normal woofer with a cardboard sound concentrator around it. Coupled to a portable driver.  We know the CPS is between 30 and 60 so record that LF sound and play it back through a woofer with a cardboard concentrator to replicate the effect.

I'm suprised that some of the bee-bop crap today won't extinguish a flame.  It sure 'extinguishes' my reason to listen to it.................
Title: Re: Science & Technology - Firefighting with sound
Post by: livewire on March 29, 2015, 12:50:45 PM
Always interested in new firefighting technology - this is very interesting...


[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPVQMZ4ikvM&feature=youtu.be]www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPVQMZ4ikvM&feature=youtu.be[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPVQMZ4ikvM&feature=youtu.be#[/url])


==========================================
Extinguish Fire Without Water? These Guys Did It With Sound [Video]
By Nicole Arce,   Tech Times | March 27, 8:56 AMSHARE(3 )TWEET(1 ) 0 COMMENTS
Sound WaveSeth Roberthson, 23, and Viet Tran, 28, have invented a new device that generates low-frequency sound waves to put out fires. Pretty soon, this new invention could replace the chemical-producing fire extinguisher in your kitchen, but at least one fire department is willing to test the device on building fires.
(Photo : George Mason University | YouTube)

A pair of graduating engineering students at George Mason University has invented a new device that can put out fires using sound waves.

That's right. No water, no foam. Only a deep, bass rumble that is similar to the thud-thumping you hear in hip hop and rap songs.

Electrical engineering major Seth Robertson teamed up with computer engineering student Viet Tran to develop a new device that could potentially revolutionize the firefighting industry. The device was borne out of a senior research project that took a year of trial-and-error and their own money amounting to $600 to test and complete.

The result is a 20-kilogram device that uses low-frequency sound waves in the range of 30 to 60 hertz that can effectively put out a fire. At first, that was not what the students had in mind. They tried placing a pan filled with a fire fueled by rubbing alcohol next to a subwoofer blaring out music, but nothing happened as they realized the frequencies in music are inconsistent.

Then they tried experimenting with ultra-high frequencies ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 hertz, but all the sound waves did was get the flames vibrating. The sweet spot, they discovered, is in the low range of 30 to 60 hertz, where the sound waves, which the students say are also pressure waves, can keep the oxygen away from the flame long enough to eventually put out the flame.

To set up the device, the students rolled a cardboard cylinder and cut out a large hole at one end to serve as the collimator, or the device that narrows the sound waves down to a single direction. They connected the collimator to a frequency generator, a small amplifier, and a power source, and the result is a fire extinguisher that uses sound waves instead of water or toxic chemicals.

As Tran tells the Washington Post, the low-frequency sound waves "separate the oxygen [which keeps the fire burning] from the fuel. The pressure wave is going back and forth, and that agitates where the air is. That specific space is enough to keep the fire from reigniting." In other words, as the sound waves move through the air, they displace the oxygen that feeds the flame, thus extinguishing the fire.

"I honestly didn't think it would work as well as it did," Tran says.

The students initially intended their invention for putting out small kitchen fires, but officials at a fire department have already volunteered to test it in putting out larger building fires. Eventually, the students believe the device can be used for other purposes, such as in extinguishing fires in large confined spaces or wider open areas, such as forest fires.

However, they say they still need to do a lot more testing to see if their device can put out fires from different combustibles, such as wood, paper, metal, or electric wires.

The project was inspired by a 2012 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) project that successfully put out a fire using a large machine that generated sound. However, DARPA admitted it could not find a practical purpose for the project because of the bulky equipment, a fact that the students capitalized on to develop something that could eventually get to market.

Check out the video shown for a demonstration of how sound waves can effectively put out an alcohol-fueled fire.

[url]http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42625/20150327/extinguish-fire-without-water-these-guys-did-it-with-sound-video.htm[/url] ([url]http://www.techtimes.com/articles/42625/20150327/extinguish-fire-without-water-these-guys-did-it-with-sound-video.htm[/url])


Works the same as blowing out a candle, except the air movement is not omnidirectional in the example using the sound waves.  Interesting concept, but not very practical, in my opinion.  To be effective, even with small fires, you would have to be very close.  It probably warrants further experimentation, though.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on March 29, 2015, 09:28:01 PM
Instead of fire sprinklers, buildings will be wired with fantastic sound systems that could be used for music during the day and fire systems when they detect a fire. Cool.  8)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on May 04, 2015, 11:48:45 AM
1951 car tech...    I'm thinking this could help some today!  ;D


5th Wheel Driving On A 1951 Cadillac (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWCuJ0uHk60#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on May 04, 2015, 11:08:24 PM
I see the Solar Challenger solar powered airplane is going to take off for a 5 day cross ocean flight to Hawaii.  Only has one pilot and I think crusing speed is less than 50 mph.  I just wonder how constipated the lone pilot will be in 5 days.

Probably has a good supply of empty plastic pee bottles.....

Talk about a painful poop.......  5 days of sitting in a seat...wow.  Preperation H to the rescue.....

Thats some crazy chit.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 10, 2015, 04:13:38 PM
1951 car tech...    I'm thinking this could help some today!  ;D


5th Wheel Driving On A 1951 Cadillac
Well that's a new one for me. Actually makes the spare do something useful. Thanks for posting.

Now my mind is wandering onto police chases and my crazy idea of shooting an airbag under a fleeing vehicle to disengage the driving wheels from the ground. Guess my other idea of disabling the PCM via an EMP isn't practical.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 12, 2015, 12:55:24 AM
Tesla CEO Elon Musk Unveils Home Battery; Is $3,000 Cheap Enough?
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/05/01/403529202/tesla-ceo-elon-musk-unveils-home-battery-is-3-000-cheap-enough (http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/05/01/403529202/tesla-ceo-elon-musk-unveils-home-battery-is-3-000-cheap-enough)

===

Electric Car Batteries Just Hit A Key Price Point
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/04/13/3646004/electric-car-batteries-price/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/04/13/3646004/electric-car-batteries-price/)

===

Glowing Tampons Help Detect Sewage Leaks
http://www.wired.com/2015/03/glowing-tampons-help-detect-sewage-leaks/ (http://www.wired.com/2015/03/glowing-tampons-help-detect-sewage-leaks/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on May 12, 2015, 01:30:42 PM
I like your last one.....  Glowing Tampons detect sweage leaks....

I wonder if you put one in your cake hole if it would stop up your sewage leak....

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on May 12, 2015, 06:35:14 PM
Interesting article on the price point for car batteries in EV...   can't tell if they include hybrids in the stats or not - but the comparisons seem steep still - Comparing a Tesla to an Audi A7

Still toys for the rich and the greenies so far.      When they make the cars cost efficient - people will buy but at a 5K premium you can buy a lot of extra gas.

I'd like to get a hybrid someday but can't see any benefit yet.   Pure electrics don't go far enough on a charge - and likely never will until the next generation of batteries or storage is found.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 13, 2015, 08:06:50 AM
I like your last one.....  Glowing Tampons detect sweage leaks....

I wonder if you put one in your cake hole if it would stop up your sewage leak....
LOL...I just included that for the simpletons. Glad you liked it.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 14, 2015, 10:10:04 AM
All The Ways Your Smartphone Is Spying On You 24/7

"Have you ever wondered how Google tracks where you are? How about what those terms and conditions mean when you access free Wi-Fi?

As scary as it sounds, your smartphone’s apps share a lot of the private information on your device with marketing agencies, phone operators and other private companies. But where does all that data go? And what happens to it?

AJ+ and the interactive documentary series “Do Not Track” investigate.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwxFMUczx5o (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwxFMUczx5o)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on May 14, 2015, 10:41:41 AM
and the police/investigators love to get their hands on smart phones for any incident


Tom Brady is being punished because he didn't ...  so they are "guessing" what was on his
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 15, 2015, 10:53:23 AM
Fruit Flies Show Fear And May Have Other Emotions As Well
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/53100/20150514/fruit-flies-show-fear-emotions-well.htm (http://www.techtimes.com/articles/53100/20150514/fruit-flies-show-fear-emotions-well.htm)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 15, 2015, 10:54:04 AM
First warm-blooded fish identified
http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/05/14/warm-blooded-fish-discovered/27318727/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/05/14/warm-blooded-fish-discovered/27318727/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 17, 2015, 02:13:32 PM
FBI: Computer expert briefly made plane fly sideways

 A computer security expert hacked into a plane's in-flight entertainment system and made it briefly fly sideways by telling one of the engines to go into climb mode.

Chris Roberts of One World Labs in Denver was flying on the plane at the time it turned sideways, according to an FBI search warrant filed in April.

The warrant was first publicized on Friday by APTN, a Canadian News Service.

Roberts told the FBI he had hacked into planes "15 to 20 times," according to court documents first made public Friday.

More here:
http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/05/16/chris-roberts-fbi-plane-hack-one-world-labs/27448335/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/05/16/chris-roberts-fbi-plane-hack-one-world-labs/27448335/)

http://www.9news.com.au/world/2015/05/17/14/04/us-man-claims-to-have-hacked-into-plane-and-altered-its-flight-path (http://www.9news.com.au/world/2015/05/17/14/04/us-man-claims-to-have-hacked-into-plane-and-altered-its-flight-path)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 27, 2015, 05:04:41 PM
This bionic lens could give everybody perfect vision
http://fortune.com/2015/05/22/this-bionic-lens-could-give-everybody-perfect-vision/ (http://fortune.com/2015/05/22/this-bionic-lens-could-give-everybody-perfect-vision/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on May 27, 2015, 09:34:58 PM
This bionic lens could give everybody perfect vision
[url]http://fortune.com/2015/05/22/this-bionic-lens-could-give-everybody-perfect-vision/[/url] ([url]http://fortune.com/2015/05/22/this-bionic-lens-could-give-everybody-perfect-vision/[/url])


I would like to know how this lens is different from the lens you get after cataract surgery? I had both eyes done for cataracts and I can see better but still need glasses.

My son wears contacts and the doctor says one of his eyes is a lazy eye and to get 20/20 he has to make the lens so strong that it gives him headaches. So he doesn't wear any in that eye. What makes this lens different?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 27, 2015, 10:09:37 PM
I would like to know how this lens is different from the lens you get after cataract surgery? I had both eyes done for cataracts and I can see better but still need glasses.

My son wears contacts and the doctor says one of his eyes is a lazy eye and to get 20/20 he has to make the lens so strong that it gives him headaches. So he doesn't wear any in that eye. What makes this lens different?
I clicked a hyperlink on that site and found this from CBC news (Canada):

Ocumetics Bionic Lens could give you vision 3x better than 20/20

Imagine being able to see three times better than 20/20 vision without wearing glasses or contacts — even at age 100 or more — with the help of bionic lenses implanted in your eyes.

Dr. Garth Webb, an optometrist in British Columbia who invented the Ocumetics Bionic Lens, says patients would have perfect vision and that driving glasses, progressive lenses and contact lenses would become a dim memory as the eye-care industry is transformed.

Webb says people who have the specialized lenses surgically inserted would never get cataracts because their natural lenses, which decay over time, would have been replaced.

Perfect eyesight would result "no matter how crummy your eyes are," Webb says, adding the Bionic Lens would be an option for someone who depends on corrective lenses and is over about age 25, when the eye structures are fully developed.

"This is vision enhancement that the world has never seen before," he says, showing a Bionic Lens, which looks like a tiny button.

"If you can just barely see the clock at 10 feet, when you get the Bionic Lens you can see the clock at 30 feet away," says Webb, demonstrating how a custom-made lens that folded like a taco in a saline-filled syringe would be placed in an eye, where it would unravel itself within 10 seconds.

8-minute surgery

He says the painless procedure, identical to cataract surgery, would take about eight minutes and a patient's sight would be immediately corrected.

Webb, who is the CEO of Ocumetics Technology Corp., has spent the last eight years and about $3 million researching and developing the Bionic Lens, getting international patents and securing a biomedical manufacturing facility in Delta, B.C.

His mission is fuelled by the "obsession" he's had to free himself and others from corrective lenses since he was in Grade 2, when he was saddled with glasses.

"My heroes were cowboys, and cowboys just did not wear glasses," Webb says.

"At age 45 I had to struggle with reading glasses, which like most people, I found was a great insult. To this day I curse my progressive glasses. I also wear contact lenses, which I also curse just about every day."

Webb's efforts culminated in his recent presentation of the lens to 14 top ophthalmologists in San Diego the day before an annual gathering of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

Dr. Vincent DeLuise, an ophthalmologist who teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, says he arranged several meetings on April 17, when experts in various fields learned about the lens.

He says the surgeons, from Canada, the United States, Australia and the Dominican Republic, were impressed with what they heard and some will be involved in clinical trials for Webb's "very clever" invention.

"There's a lot of excitement about the Bionic Lens from very experienced surgeons who perhaps had some cynicism about this because they've seen things not work in the past. They think that this might actually work and they're eager enough that they all wish to be on the medical advisory board to help him on his journey," DeLuise says.

"I think this device is going to bring us closer to the holy grail of excellent vision at all ranges — distant, intermediate and near."

Clinical trials on animals, blind humans

Pending clinical trials on animals and then blind human eyes, the Bionic Lens could be available in Canada and elsewhere in about two years, depending on regulatory processes in various countries, Webb says.

As for laser surgery, which requires the burning away of healthy corneal tissue and includes potential problems with glare, the need for night-time driving glasses and later cataracts, Webb says the Bionic Lens may make that option obsolete.

Alongside his Bionic Lens venture, Webb has set up a foundation called the Celebration of Sight, which would donate money to organizations providing eye surgery in developing countries to improve people's quality of life.

"Perfect eyesight should be a human right," he says.

DeLuise, who has been asked to manage the foundation, says funds would also be funnelled to some of the world's best eye research institutes.

"He has the technology that may make all of this happen," he says, adding several companies have spent tens of millions of dollars trying to develop a similar lens, though none have come close.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/ocumetics-bionic-lens-could-give-you-vision-3x-better-than-20-20-1.3078257 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/ocumetics-bionic-lens-could-give-you-vision-3x-better-than-20-20-1.3078257)

The first comment after the story said:

As an optometrist in BC this is really a cool advancement. However, a few things weren't mentioned or really made clear. This is a type of multifocal lens which already exists today and typically run about $4000. It is also a procedure called a clear lens extraction or CLE which many laser eye centers already perform. The point is to remove your natural lens in the eye and replace it with a powered implant. Typically they implant only a lens with distance power still requiring reading glasses for up close. This type of muliifocal lens has also been used in cataract surgeries to provide people with clear distance, intermediate and near vision although they have been less than impressive. I'm excited to see if this will be an advancement in that area. Secondly, 3x better than 20/20 is a bit misleading. 3x worse than 20/20 isn't 20/60 as the the eye chart units don'y increase and decrease linearly . So 3x better than 20/20 may only be 20/15, still better though. Also, the claim that you will see better "no matter how crummy your eyes are" is also grossly misleading. It is true if you have no other diseases of the eye such as corneal scarring, glaucoma, optic nerve damage, a lazy eye, retinal detachments, eye turns or macular degeneration. All these diseases can lead to a loss of transmission from the eye too the brain that is the nerve fibers are lost. If there is a loss of cortical connections then no lens implant will make your vision any sharper. This will work best for adults who have no other eye disease. Finally, there are the risk involved with the surgery such as retinal detachments, infections and inflammation to name a few. I am excited to see what advancements this brings though.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on May 27, 2015, 10:33:22 PM
I had read the article but didn't read the comment after.

That is what I figured that it wouldn't help lazy eye.

I had my cataract surgery 11 years ago and in one eye there is a protein film growing on the new lens they put in. Normally they just laser it off but my doctor says I have a wrinkled retina and the laser can cause grief with that. So he wants to wait until it is absolutely necessary before he lasers it. Meanwhile that one eye is very bad.  :-\
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on May 27, 2015, 10:42:27 PM
I had read the article but didn't read the comment after.

That is what I figured that it wouldn't help lazy eye.

I had my cataract surgery 11 years ago and in one eye there is a protein film growing on the new lens they put in. Normally they just laser it off but my doctor says I have a wrinkled retina and the laser can cause grief with that. So he wants to wait until it is absolutely necessary before he lasers it. Meanwhile that one eye is very bad.  :-\
What about a second opinion?

One would think that with the various advancements being made in medicine that a solution would appear to remedy issues such as yours.

I imagine there must be somebody out there with the skills and experience to do something helpful.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on July 30, 2015, 05:42:41 PM
Scientists look to unveil high speed anonymous network

Computer researchers out of Zurich and London have been working to create a completely encrypted computer network similar to Tor, but with a much faster speed. Lindsay France has more information on what’s being called Hornet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdfhlqUPMbI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdfhlqUPMbI)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: ducksoup on August 31, 2015, 04:11:54 PM
I was beginning to think Consumer Reports, the trusted bible for impartial consumer advice, had swallowed the Tesla Kool-Aid.
The magazine said today “it couldn’t wait” until its October car ratings come out to tell people how great the all-wheel-drive version of Tesla Motors TSLA +0.40% battery-powered Model S, is. It’s so good, in fact, that it busted the test curve. The P85D earned a 103 out of a possible 100, prompting engineers to recalibrate their ratings methods “to account for the car’s exceptionally strong performance.” In the end, Consumer Reports awarded the car a score of 100, setting a new standard for perfection.
So I called Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports’ director of automotive testing, to make sure he wasn’t hallucinating. (This is the same guy who gave the Model S a near-perfect 99 two years ago.) To my surprise, he sounded quite rational.
“Let’s be clear about something,” he told me. “We don’t test $120,000 cars. We’re not doing this because we want people to go out and find the best $120,000 car. This is really a glimpse into the future of what we can see in cars.” Consumer Reports could test high-performance cars, he said, but they all come with compromises, like poor fuel economy or harsher rides. “This is the first time that a car increases performance with all-wheel-drive and energy efficiency. It’s unprecedented,” he said. “It’s pushing the envelope in so many benchmarks that it really scored off the charts.”
That’s why engineers had to tweak their scoring system for things like acceleration. The original 85-kWh Model S goes from 0-60 in 5.6 seconds; the P85D needs just 3.5 seconds.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/joannmuller/2015/08/27/is-consumer-reports-crazy-teslas-perfect-score-breaks-the-test/ (http://www.forbes.com/sites/joannmuller/2015/08/27/is-consumer-reports-crazy-teslas-perfect-score-breaks-the-test/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on August 31, 2015, 04:18:52 PM
If our phones and iPads run any faster they will need fans to cool them
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:13:35 AM
NASA creates ‘self-healing’ material that repairs itself

NASA scientists have created a ‘self-healing’ material that when damaged oozes out a liquid that repairs any holes. The new creation may prove potentially life-saving if used in spacecraft or more Earthly construction, as RT’s Simone Del Rosario explains.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IgL8fO8pLA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IgL8fO8pLA)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:17:06 AM
Police pursuing criminals with cellphone tracking tech

Reports are coming forward stating that police departments in major cities like New York and Baltimore are using the “Stingray” cellphone tracking system to follow and arrest individuals for petty crimes and misdemeanors.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6XiecSvdVA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6XiecSvdVA)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:17:54 AM
Not-so-lethal weapons: US, Canada police testing less lethal ammunitions

At least 22 police departments across the US and Canada are testing “less-lethal” forms of ammunition which are capable of incapacitating someone but would not harm them critically. But critics, like Denise Lieberman from the Don’t Shoot Coalition, are not convinced that these forms of ammunition are any less lethal than those currently being used by police.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uj6MjWh5UM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uj6MjWh5UM)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:18:48 AM
’Sound’ Hacking: Software can hack computers through vibrations

Programmers and cybersecurity specialists have uncovered a new threat to computer security: software that’s able to analyze the vibrations from your phones and computers to transfer data and hack into your system

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dO82NdwmieY (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dO82NdwmieY)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:19:39 AM
New Facebook software can scan, snitch on people for criminal activity

Social media giant Facebook has developed software to check in on people who may be engaging in criminal activities and alert company employees to decide whether to contact authorities. Boom Bust’s Erin Ade talks with Manila Chan about the software and security concerns for consumers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwZrBs2I-1s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwZrBs2I-1s)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 02, 2015, 08:20:12 AM
Use Firefox? You need this security update, stat
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/use-firefox-you-need-this-security-update-stat/ (http://www.cbsnews.com/news/use-firefox-you-need-this-security-update-stat/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 03, 2015, 04:23:01 PM
Is this true? Kids will never learn math.

iPhone's! Checking my son's math homework has never been so easy!! I don't even need to think! And it shows how to get the answer too!! Technology is great! App is called Photo Math, and it's free

https://video-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hvideo-xpf1/v/t42.1790-2/11873822_10204744771565318_1131465407_n.mp4?efg=eyJybHIiOjMzNCwicmxhIjo1MTJ9&rl=334&vabr=186&oh=b511cb3e19ceb5be835b9012971c3f90&oe=55E8D446
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monique on September 03, 2015, 05:23:34 PM
Is this true? Kids will never learn math.

iPhone's! Checking my son's math homework has never been so easy!! I don't even need to think! And it shows how to get the answer too!! Technology is great! App is called Photo Math, and it's free

https://video-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hvideo-xpf1/v/t42.1790-2/11873822_10204744771565318_1131465407_n.mp4?efg=eyJybHIiOjMzNCwicmxhIjo1MTJ9&rl=334&vabr=186&oh=b511cb3e19ceb5be835b9012971c3f90&oe=55E8D446
This is great! Thanks for posting! I'm no slouch at math, but I sure get tired of remembering how to divide mixed fractions, etcetera. This will be a big help this school year!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: sammy on September 03, 2015, 05:27:17 PM
This is great! Thanks for posting! I'm no slouch at math, but I sure get tired of remembering how to divide mixed fractions, etcetera. This will be a big help this school year!
Where was this stuff when I was struggling with algebra and geometry? I stopped helping my son with algebra when he was in eighth grade.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on September 05, 2015, 06:42:13 PM
LOL sammy, even as a degreed engineer I had to do the same at about the same age.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 13, 2015, 12:49:36 PM
You can now download and 3D print your very own TSA master baggage keys

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-printed-tsa-master-key/ (http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-printed-tsa-master-key/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 13, 2015, 12:50:11 PM
Cancer patient's ribs replaced with 3-D printed titanium set

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/09/11/Cancer-patients-ribs-replaced-with-3-D-printed-titanium-set/6061441980560/ (http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2015/09/11/Cancer-patients-ribs-replaced-with-3-D-printed-titanium-set/6061441980560/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 13, 2015, 12:53:25 PM
The Next Generation Of Solar Panels May Be Inspired By Ancient Japanese Papercraft
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/09/09/3699810/solar-cells-inspired-by-paper-cutting/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/09/09/3699810/solar-cells-inspired-by-paper-cutting/)

===

Novel efficient and low-cost semitransparent solar cells
(http://images.sciencedaily.com/2015/09/150908103652_1_540x360.jpg)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150908103652.htm (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150908103652.htm)

===

New-generation solar panels far cheaper, more efficient: scientists
A new generation of solar panels made from a mineral called perovskite has the potential to convert solar energy into household electricity more cheaply than ever before, according to a study from Briain's Exeter University.

Super-thin, custom-colored panels attached to a building's windows may become a "holy grail" for India and African countries, Senthilarasu Sundaram, one of the authors of the study, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

"In those countries these types of material will be like a holy grail: they can both shade windows ... and at the same time produce electricity," he said.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/27/us-global-renewables-solar-idUSKBN0L020720150127 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/27/us-global-renewables-solar-idUSKBN0L020720150127)

===

How Much Can You Save With Solar Panels? Just Ask Google

IF YOU’RE CONSIDERING solar power but aren’t quite sure it’s worth the expense, Google wants to point you in the right direction. Tapping its trove of satellite imagery and the latest in artificial intelligence, the company is offering a new online service that will instantly estimate how much you’ll save with a roof full of solar panels.
http://www.wired.com/2015/08/much-can-save-solar-panels-just-ask-google/ (http://www.wired.com/2015/08/much-can-save-solar-panels-just-ask-google/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 15, 2015, 08:46:07 PM
New tech lets man feel object with prosthetic hand

Scientists at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) have created a prosthetic hand which helps paralyzed people feel sensations. DARPA uses two chips embedded in the wearer’s brain, helping them perceive, touch and control objects using just their thoughts.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTzhmKz9Ew4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTzhmKz9Ew4#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 24, 2015, 02:16:30 PM
The imagination of today - the reality of tomorrow!

We saw the Dick Tracy  TV watch phone come to fruition in our time -

====================================================
Quantum teleportation record broken: Can life imitate Star Trek?
Quantum leap: Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have successfully transferred information from one photon to another across 60 miles of fiber-optic cable.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2015/0923/Quantum-teleportation-record-broken-Can-life-imitate-Star-Trek (http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2015/0923/Quantum-teleportation-record-broken-Can-life-imitate-Star-Trek)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 24, 2015, 05:34:08 PM
Be sure to read the little popups you might get on the iPad. I've had 2 today.  One from Toyota asking if it could use the camera on my IPad.  I think the other was from Jawbone. 
Can't imagine what all they would do.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on September 24, 2015, 10:13:41 PM
Be sure to read the little popups you might get on the iPad. I've had 2 today.  One from Toyota asking if it could use the camera on my IPad.  I think the other was from Jawbone. 
Can't imagine what all they would do.
Gee...that's a pretty bold marketing move.

On the bright side...at least you were asked.

I put stickers over every built-in camera on my devices.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 27, 2015, 10:24:06 AM
It appears the new version of the Iphone has waterproofing built in -

Probably don't want people to cancel their insurance or take the full responsibility so they aren't "advertising" it as such...

http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/the-new-apple-iphones-survive-a-dunking-test/ (http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/the-new-apple-iphones-survive-a-dunking-test/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on September 27, 2015, 10:43:33 AM
I hope the other phone makers catch on, that is a pretty neat feature for fishermen and golfers who can't seem to stay out of the water hazards.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 27, 2015, 11:07:57 AM
Nice,  Last iPad update and now i can pair my phone to the iPad again.  Technology will never be foolproof.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 29, 2015, 11:33:09 PM
Fusion energy may soon be used in small-scale power stations. This means producing environmentally friendly heating and electricity at a low cost from fuel found in water. Both heating generators and generators for electricity could be developed within a few years, according to research that has primarily been conducted at the University of Gothenburg.

Nuclear fusion is a process whereby atomic nuclei melt together and release energy. Because of the low binding energy of the tiny atomic nuclei, energy can be released by combining two small nuclei with a heavier one. A collaboration between researchers at the University of Gothenburg and the University of Iceland has been to study a new type of nuclear fusion process. This produces almost no neutrons but instead fast, heavy electrons (muons), since it is based on nuclear reactions in ultra-dense heavy hydrogen (deuterium).

"This is a considerable advantage compared to other nuclear fusion processes which are under development at other research facilities, since the neutrons produced by such processes can cause dangerous flash burns," says Leif Holmlid, Professor Emeritus at the University of Gothenburg.

No radiation The new fusion process can take place in relatively small laser-fired fusion reactors fueled by heavy hydrogen (deuterium). It has already been shown to produce more energy than that needed to start it. Heavy hydrogen is found in large quantities in ordinary water and is easy to extract. The dangerous handling of radioactive heavy hydrogen (tritium) which would most likely be needed for operating large-scale fusion reactors with a magnetic enclosure in the future is therefore unnecessary.

" A considerable advantage of the fast heavy electrons produced by the new process is that these are charged and can therefore produce electrical energy instantly. The energy in the neutrons which accumulate in large quantities in other types of nuclear fusion is difficult to handle because the neutrons are not charged. These neutrons are high-energy and very damaging to living organisms, whereas the fast, heavy electrons are considerably less dangerous."

Neutrons are difficult to slow down or stop and require reactor enclosures that are several meters thick. Muons -- fast, heavy electrons -- decay very quickly into ordinary electrons and similar particles.

Research shows that far smaller and simpler fusion reactors can be built. The next step is to create a generator that produces instant electrical energy.

The research done in this area has been supported by GU Ventures AB, the holding company linked to the University of Gothenburg. The results have recently been published in three international scientific journals.

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Gothenburg. The original item was written by Carina Eliasson. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150925085550.htm (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150925085550.htm)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 02, 2015, 04:47:47 PM
‘Thirsty’ Concrete Soaks Up 1000 Gallons Of Water A Minute, Will Blow Your Mind
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/09/30/3706935/permeable-concrete-climate-change-benefits/ (http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2015/09/30/3706935/permeable-concrete-climate-change-benefits/)

Hmmm...I wonder about what happens to the water that flows through that "permeable concrete"

It seems the freeze-thaw cycle would cause problems...or what about undermining?
Title: RAW: Engineers show off their miniature cockroach robot
Post by: Frenchfry on October 02, 2015, 04:49:47 PM
RAW: Engineers show off their miniature cockroach robot

Engineers at the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University showed off a miniature robot, which is based on the movement and appearance of a cockroach, in Kaliningrad, Thursday. the team hoped the robot's "small mechanical systems" would help with the development of "biomedical appendices, including prosthetic limbs."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qqfql_dg03k (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qqfql_dg03k#)

Too big...and they need a means of eliminating other insects.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 19, 2015, 11:14:12 AM
GPS-BASED TAXI METERS WILL NOW BE USED FOR THE TAXI CABS
http://www.themarketbusiness.com/2015-10-17-gps-based-taxi-meters-will-now-be-used-for-the-taxi-cabs (http://www.themarketbusiness.com/2015-10-17-gps-based-taxi-meters-will-now-be-used-for-the-taxi-cabs)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on October 19, 2015, 11:17:32 AM
Loophole Gives Some Buyers of Tesla's Model X a $25,000 Tax Deduction

The windfall could produce a public relations backlash among people who may object to tax cuts for the rich.

http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Tesla-Tax-Loophole-Nets-Big-Bucks/story.xhtml?story_id=033002GGTJT6 (http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Tesla-Tax-Loophole-Nets-Big-Bucks/story.xhtml?story_id=033002GGTJT6)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on October 23, 2015, 09:57:34 AM
There was talk at the time I was working with them on the design/development of the Model S that there was a combination of state and fed tax breaks that took out 20 grand or so off the vehicle.  That was in 2011 or 12.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on October 24, 2015, 12:26:31 PM
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/98848/20151023/youtube-red-faces-backlash-from-youtube-community-for-forcing-creators-to-sign-subscription-deal.htm (http://www.techtimes.com/articles/98848/20151023/youtube-red-faces-backlash-from-youtube-community-for-forcing-creators-to-sign-subscription-deal.htm)

So if I get this right - you now have to pay 10/month to post video's?    Yeah right...
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 03, 2015, 10:35:33 AM
MasterCard wants to turn any gadget into a payment device
http://www.slashgear.com/mastercard-wants-to-turn-any-gadget-into-a-payment-device-27411695/ (http://www.slashgear.com/mastercard-wants-to-turn-any-gadget-into-a-payment-device-27411695/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 03, 2015, 10:50:49 AM
RoboBee is here to swim, fly
http://www.natureworldreport.com/2015/10/robobee-is-like-something-right-out-of-a-james-bond-flick/ (http://www.natureworldreport.com/2015/10/robobee-is-like-something-right-out-of-a-james-bond-flick/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on November 11, 2015, 03:25:05 PM
A few days ago the Bank of America published a 300-page report touting the huge potential gains from investing in robots and artificial intelligence. Annual global sales of robots is soaring -- reaching a record $10.7 billion last year, amid advancements in data analytics, microchips, and sensors. By 2020, the authors expect the robot market to be worth $83 billion, as bots take on more and more tasks humans used to do. Buried in the report is also the risk of “societal upheaval” if robots take all the jobs. According to a separate report from researchers at Oxford University, robots could replace 47 percent of all jobs in the U.S. (and 35 percent in Britain) over the next twenty years. That’s not good news for investors, because the multitude of jobless won’t have any money to buy the bots or anything they produce.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-stocks-to-watch-as-robots-take-over-the-world-2015-11-05 (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-stocks-to-watch-as-robots-take-over-the-world-2015-11-05)
Title: Google's self driving car pulled over for going to slow!
Post by: BigRedDog on November 13, 2015, 08:03:51 AM
It's probably time the world considered slowing down a little anyway ;) ;) ;)


http://www.theverge.com/2015/11/12/9726250/google-self-driving-car-police-pulled-over-slow (http://www.theverge.com/2015/11/12/9726250/google-self-driving-car-police-pulled-over-slow)
Title: Ford is first to test self-driving cars at fake Michigan city
Post by: BigRedDog on November 13, 2015, 08:07:08 AM
I'm curious to see how these cars will react on black ice :o :o :o

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/11/13/ford-revs-up-self-driving-car-program-fake-michigan-city/75673552/ (http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/11/13/ford-revs-up-self-driving-car-program-fake-michigan-city/75673552/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on November 13, 2015, 08:15:36 AM
A few days ago the Bank of America published a 300-page report touting the huge potential gains from investing in robots and artificial intelligence. Annual global sales of robots is soaring -- reaching a record $10.7 billion last year, amid advancements in data analytics, microchips, and sensors. By 2020, the authors expect the robot market to be worth $83 billion, as bots take on more and more tasks humans used to do. Buried in the report is also the risk of “societal upheaval” if robots take all the jobs. According to a separate report from researchers at Oxford University, robots could replace 47 percent of all jobs in the U.S. (and 35 percent in Britain) over the next twenty years. That’s not good news for investors, because the multitude of jobless won’t have any money to buy the bots or anything they produce.

[url]http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-stocks-to-watch-as-robots-take-over-the-world-2015-11-05[/url] ([url]http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-are-the-stocks-to-watch-as-robots-take-over-the-world-2015-11-05[/url])


Reminds me of a story I've heard many times over the years...

Although Walter Reuther does say it was not Henry Ford II he had the discussion with the important part is that the discussion did occur with someone in upper management at Ford back in the 1950s!!!

Quote
An article on the Economist website recently told an extraordinary anecdote about automation. The rivals in the tale were two titans in the world of automobile manufacturing who took a tour of a newly built and highly-automated factory. The forceful executive, Henry Ford II, and the leader of the automobile workers union, Walter Reuther, both saw many examples of advanced machinery operating at the plant. The words they exchanged brilliantly encapsulated the paradox of automation:

Henry Ford II: Walter, how are you going to get those robots to pay your union dues?

Walter Reuther: Henry, how are you going to get them to buy your cars?


More at:  http://quoteinvestigator.com/tag/henry-ford-ii/ (http://quoteinvestigator.com/tag/henry-ford-ii/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 14, 2015, 02:51:13 PM
'Fool's gold battery' developed as alternative to lithium ion

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/11/13/Fools-gold-battery-developed-as-alternative-to-lithium-ion/5991447435144/ (http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/11/13/Fools-gold-battery-developed-as-alternative-to-lithium-ion/5991447435144/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 23, 2015, 09:56:40 PM
Is this for real?   ???

Six Million Dollar Plant: Scientists grow cyborg roses
A team of researchers has created living rose plants with electronic circuits threaded through their veins.

http://www.cnet.com/au/news/six-million-dollar-plant-scientists-grow-cyborg-roses/ (http://www.cnet.com/au/news/six-million-dollar-plant-scientists-grow-cyborg-roses/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on November 24, 2015, 12:34:01 PM
Is this for real?   ???

Six Million Dollar Plant: Scientists grow cyborg roses
A team of researchers has created living rose plants with electronic circuits threaded through their veins.

[url]http://www.cnet.com/au/news/six-million-dollar-plant-scientists-grow-cyborg-roses/[/url] ([url]http://www.cnet.com/au/news/six-million-dollar-plant-scientists-grow-cyborg-roses/[/url])


I see they can be used for green antennas, great for ham radio maybe.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on November 26, 2015, 06:25:11 AM
Inaudible sound waking your devices to track you

The Center for Democracy and Technology, or CDT, recently filed comments with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over the use of ultrasonic tracking. More and more companies are implanting inaudible sounds into advertisements that humans can't hear, but other smart devices can. Those sounds effectively help your smart devices network to better track you.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqSimcBrRWo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqSimcBrRWo#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on November 26, 2015, 06:40:17 AM
Scary...

not the threat from the advertising part of it but the part about how it can cause your devices to communicate...

I see lots of potential for plenty of 'illegal' tracking using similar technology!  I'm actually to the point I could live without a TV (other than watching a few 'big day' sporting events but couldn't live without my multiple computers, cell phone, tablets.

No 'fit bit' yet although I do use some fitness apps on my phone!

I'll have to start paying closer attention to the dogs and see if they do this...

I'll have to look for a list of TVs that have this ability...  if it's on either of our TVs maybe I can figure out how to 'block' it!!!

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on January 06, 2016, 02:49:38 PM
Detroit - 2016:

We already saw articles last year on how the Fire Department is notified of a call...  a pop can falls on the floor after a Fax comes through the machine

Now  this!

Police are going to start punching in on time clocks...   a novel idea for the 1910's-80's

However shortly after that they discovered this thing that Al Gore created - called the Internet! 
http://www.monroenews.com/news/2016/jan/05/detroit-police-not-liking-time-clocks/ (http://www.monroenews.com/news/2016/jan/05/detroit-police-not-liking-time-clocks/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on January 29, 2016, 06:11:08 PM
How to spy on strangers’ webcams

Search engine, Shodan, just launched a new section that allows users to browse through vulnerable webcams to see into places otherwise thought private. Webcam users who don't use passwords and use Real Time Streaming Protocol 554 are leaving their cameras open to vulnerable, in effect allowing anyone to see whatever they've pointed their camera at.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-q2p3J7IPs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-q2p3J7IPs#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 12, 2016, 05:23:18 PM
Crosstracking: New way internet giants are snooping on you

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haTQ8bs2JDI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=haTQ8bs2JDI)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on February 12, 2016, 05:26:34 PM
How to spy on strangers’ webcams

Search engine, Shodan, just launched a new section that allows users to browse through vulnerable webcams to see into places otherwise thought private. Webcam users who don't use passwords and use Real Time Streaming Protocol 554 are leaving their cameras open to vulnerable, in effect allowing anyone to see whatever they've pointed their camera at.

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-q2p3J7IPs]www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-q2p3J7IPs[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-q2p3J7IPs#[/url])


Hmmmm....

could be more interesting than the Playboy Channel :o :o :o
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on February 13, 2016, 09:30:17 PM
There was  a story on channel 7 yesterday saying that someone in Russia has a whole list of unsecured security cameras that you can watch. One was in a bedroom and this guy walked in naked and they had it on there. Wonder what they saw later on in there. Some had cameras in their kids and babies rooms.

Some people can't handle technology, all they need is a password.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on February 13, 2016, 10:05:04 PM
There was  a story on channel 7 yesterday saying that someone in Russia has a whole list of unsecured security cameras that you can watch. One was in a bedroom and this guy walked in naked and they had it on there. Wonder what they saw later on in there. Some had cameras in their kids and babies rooms.

Some people can't handle technology, all they need is a password.
Some people are exhibitionists and will drop trou at every opportunity.  Often times I wonder about people that prefer living in (mostly) glass houses without curtains/drapes/window coverings. But it's not uncommon to hear of someone catching a glimpse of someone in their birthday suit right in front of a window...for all to see. Personally I believe people shouldn't be looking into the windows of others anyway...but that's just me. I'm amazed how relaxed people are in front of a camera...especially when they're nude.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on February 14, 2016, 07:11:59 AM
Some people are exhibitionists and will drop trou at every opportunity.  Often times I wonder about people that prefer living in (mostly) glass houses without curtains/drapes/window coverings. But it's not uncommon to hear of someone catching a glimpse of someone in their birthday suit right in front of a window...for all to see. Personally I believe people shouldn't be looking into the windows of others anyway...but that's just me. I'm amazed how relaxed people are in front of a camera...especially when they're nude.

We were just discussing the 'charms' of Chelsea Charms a few weeks ago...

from some of the articles I've read about her she's especially comfortable in front of a camera ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: arpydave on March 23, 2016, 09:26:06 AM
It's about time the FCC started doing this

Beyond the Box

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2016/03/the_fcc_is_doing_the_right_thing_on_set_top_cable_boxes_here_s_how_we_know.html (http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2016/03/the_fcc_is_doing_the_right_thing_on_set_top_cable_boxes_here_s_how_we_know.html)

Unfortunately, many people are unaware that you can avoid paying a monthly fee to upgrade to a wireless cable modem from a wired modem by going to Best Buy or Amazon and paying a flat rate to own your own and replace theirs.

But you do have to be careful with compatibility between the modem you pick and your carrier's configuration. I have one I bought in advance before I priced and made my pick between carriers, I went with ATT over ComCast and now I'm stuck with it because I can't even Craig's List it here. ATT dominates by price.

And ATT doesn't charge me a fee on it, so oh well.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 23, 2016, 09:33:31 AM
It's about time the FCC started doing this

Beyond the Box

[url]http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2016/03/the_fcc_is_doing_the_right_thing_on_set_top_cable_boxes_here_s_how_we_know.html[/url] ([url]http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2016/03/the_fcc_is_doing_the_right_thing_on_set_top_cable_boxes_here_s_how_we_know.html[/url])

Unfortunately, many people are unaware that you can avoid paying a monthly fee to upgrade to a wireless cable modem from a wired modem by going to Best Buy or Amazon and paying a flat rate to own your own and replace theirs.

But you do have to be careful with compatibility between the modem you pick and your carrier's configuration. I have one I bought in advance before I priced and made my pick between carriers, I went with ATT over ComCast and now I'm stuck with it because I can't even Craig's List it here. ATT dominates by price.

And ATT doesn't charge me a fee on it, so oh well.
Just talked to somebody that went with cable in Adrian recently...and noticed they were being charged for a DVR rental...yet they never received one.
Guess that was enough for the customer to drop everything except the internet service.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on March 23, 2016, 12:44:18 PM
Just talked to somebody that went with cable in Adrian recently...and noticed they were being charged for a DVR rental...yet they never received one.
Guess that was enough for the customer to drop everything except the internet service.
Hopefully they had documentation and can recover the "theft"...   

Cable companies act like they are almighty and the signs they post to intimidate - (this is a utility protected by federal laws - claiming if you are perceived as threat by complaining to loudly you can be prosecuted)

Waiting for Apple TV, netflix, or others to offer that competition that has been lacking.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Frenchfry on March 23, 2016, 02:31:45 PM
Hopefully they had documentation and can recover the "theft"...   

Cable companies act like they are almighty and the signs they post to intimidate - (this is a utility protected by federal laws - claiming if you are perceived as threat by complaining to loudly you can be prosecuted)

Waiting for Apple TV, netflix, or others to offer that competition that has been lacking.
Not sure how one could document something that didn't exist but the cable company knew they made a mistake and credited their account.

Good thing they looked at all the details of the bill to pick it up in the first place rather than just paying the bill as presented.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on March 28, 2016, 03:23:45 PM
Here is a machine that uses laser to remove rust and paint from metals.
So COOL!

https://www.facebook.com/ScienceNaturePage/videos/799474420184818/ (https://www.facebook.com/ScienceNaturePage/videos/799474420184818/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on April 06, 2016, 08:56:04 AM
Here is a machine that uses laser to remove rust and paint from metals.
So COOL!

https://www.facebook.com/ScienceNaturePage/videos/799474420184818/ (https://www.facebook.com/ScienceNaturePage/videos/799474420184818/)

I'll take one...   

any idea on a price?

There's a new Harbor Freight here and I went looking last week...

didn't see one of those though ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on April 06, 2016, 09:07:05 AM
Interesting how far so much of the technology has advanced in 20 years but especially in the battery development and pricing. 

Many years ago I bought one of the very first Sony Mavica digital cameras that was available.  I could 'save' about two dozen pictures to a floppy disc and then just pop the disc in the computer and upload them to whatever project I was working on.

I quickly discovered that with all the mechanical disc drive working that a battery wouldn't last all day so I bought a second battery....  $99 battery for a $400 camera! 

The Mavicas (bought a 2nd one later) are long gone but I still use a Sony digital palm corder that uses a very similar battery.  Plus, since there is no mechanical 'drive' it lasts a couple of hours even recording.  Our youngest daughther graduates from her academy tomorrow and I brought the video cam along to record the ceremony.  Getting everything out the other day and discovered I'd left the charger at home.  It's actually an external power cord that plugs into the camera and then charges the battery while mounted to the camera. 

So I got on Amazon and found two new batteries (nothing really wrong with the old one) plus an international plug in charger with a 12VDC auto adapter package for about $35 delivered and taxed here to the door!!!  It got here yesterday and the batteries are every bit the quality of the original battery.  They are called 'info batteries' because they constantly update their condition into recording and standby time on the camcorder screen.  Plus they're actually a step or two up in capacity from the original.

I can probably record all night if I have to ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 06, 2016, 09:10:03 AM
Somehow, I don't think that laser will ever be at HF.  I already have the old school machine...  sand /media blaster.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on April 06, 2016, 09:12:54 AM
Somehow, I don't think that laser will ever be at HF.  I already have the old school machine...  sand /media blaster.

Did you ever take an old low amp battery charger and immerse your project in a tank with an annode and let the charger 'boil' the rust off?  Works good on small projects but hard to get a whole tractor in a tank ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 06, 2016, 02:54:44 PM
I've fiddled with tank anodizing before but the acid fumes will kill you. ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on April 13, 2016, 09:53:24 PM
Interesting video.

https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceWorld/videos/1173654972667774/ (https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceWorld/videos/1173654972667774/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on April 14, 2016, 08:18:07 AM
Interesting video.

https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceWorld/videos/1173654972667774/ (https://www.facebook.com/TheScienceWorld/videos/1173654972667774/)

Louise has a nice smile!

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on April 14, 2016, 09:04:21 PM
I'll take one...   

any idea on a price?

There's a new Harbor Freight here and I went looking last week...

didn't see one of those though ;D ;D ;D


How many do you want?

Costs for low-power units start at $50,000. Power supplies can be worn as a backpack for mobile devices, and roll-out generators are available for stationary models. The low-power, 12-W devices treat small areas, and medium- and high-power devices up to 1000 W tackle intensive projects. Customized designs are available for specialized process controls and other cleaning applications. CleanLaser also offers robot-guided and gantry systems.

http://machinedesign.com/metals/simple-handheld-laser-demonstrates-complete-rust-removal (http://machinedesign.com/metals/simple-handheld-laser-demonstrates-complete-rust-removal)

http://www.cleanlaser.de/wEnglish/produkte/high-power-cl-1000.php (http://www.cleanlaser.de/wEnglish/produkte/high-power-cl-1000.php)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: excelsior on May 16, 2016, 11:00:01 PM

This is pretty cool technology.

Can You Hear Me in French (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6SFbSD63IQ#)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on May 18, 2016, 09:28:20 AM
Hoping I never need one but good to know the 'procedure' is becoming feasible...

I can't stand the thought of having anyone 'cut' on me...

and especially down there :o :o :o

Out of curiosity I wonder if there are any options ;) ;) ;)


http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/cancer-patient-receives-first-penis-transplant-in-us-05-16-2016-124703543 (http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/cancer-patient-receives-first-penis-transplant-in-us-05-16-2016-124703543)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on May 18, 2016, 12:04:11 PM
Short gets longer....Long gets shorter....lol
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on May 22, 2016, 11:31:21 PM
Wow, I wonder if he had a choice of what he would get?

"A man in China received a penis transplant in 2005. That operation also appeared to be successful, but doctors said the man asked them to remove his new penis two weeks later because of psychological problems experienced by him and his wife."

The poor wife probably said Nooo way.  :o
Title: Drones and flying cows to help cell phone industry!
Post by: BigRedDog on July 18, 2016, 10:25:15 AM
http://www.wxyz.com/news/att-using-drones-to-inspect-cell-towers-exploring-possibilities-with-flying-cows (http://www.wxyz.com/news/att-using-drones-to-inspect-cell-towers-exploring-possibilities-with-flying-cows)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 30, 2016, 08:13:18 AM
I wonder how Elon Musk will fare (Telsa) with his failed crash avoidance system.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on August 04, 2016, 10:07:46 AM
I'm curious how many phones a cell tower can handle -
I'm seeing a marked change in my phone at home and as a coincidence the fair is going on...   can only imagine thousands of teens walking around texting each other
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on August 04, 2016, 11:41:04 AM
I'm curious how many phones a cell tower can handle -
I'm seeing a marked change in my phone at home and as a coincidence the fair is going on...   can only imagine thousands of teens walking around texting each other

I'm sure there are lots of variables and that probably typically a tower in a more rural location will have much less capacity than in an urban area or high traffic (along I-75) area.

Possibly no consideration was given for the higher volume one week a year!!!

An acronym we used in the Army...

PPPPP...

prior planning prevents poor performance!!!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on August 04, 2016, 11:48:06 AM
I've read that texting doesn't put as much burden on cellular communications as voice.  They can fit the texting In between the voice. But I'd guess after a time an increase in texts in an area would have an affect forcing you to get in line.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on August 04, 2016, 01:54:07 PM
I've read that texting doesn't put as much burden on cellular communications as voice.  They can fit the texting In between the voice. But I'd guess after a time an increase in texts in an area would have an affect forcing you to get in line.

I know that during power outages and other 'down' times you can send a text to and from a phone you can't call or call from...

always did wonder about that but apparently it requires much less bandwidth or a different part of the radio wave spectrum.
Title: You've seen Google's street view... now they have 'sheep' view!!!
Post by: BigRedDog on August 04, 2016, 02:05:42 PM
I wonder if this is one of the islands on Erie Mermaid's itinerary?

http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/absence-google-street-view-faroe-islands-launches-sheep-view (http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/absence-google-street-view-faroe-islands-launches-sheep-view)

(https://media.mnn.com/assets/images/2016/07/SheepView360-FaroeIslands-2.jpg.838x0_q80.jpg)



Title: Jeep hackers found new, scarier method
Post by: BigRedDog on August 05, 2016, 11:24:30 AM
Jeep hackers found new, scarier method!

I know we discussed this a year or so ago and now these guys are at it again!!!

http://www.13abc.com/content/news/Jeep-hackers-found-new-scarier-method-389253322.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter_13abc (http://www.13abc.com/content/news/Jeep-hackers-found-new-scarier-method-389253322.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter_13abc)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on August 05, 2016, 03:44:28 PM
One of the techs at the shop told me that Tesla has designed and is testing a prototype electrical Class 8 tractor (Semi) that has 6 driving motors in each wheel.  Thats 24 driving motors on a tandem.

I cannot imagine how much the batteries weigh.
Title: Re: Jeep hackers found new, scarier method
Post by: BigRedDog on August 05, 2016, 09:21:01 PM
Jeep hackers found new, scarier method!

I know we discussed this a year or so ago and now these guys are at it again!!!

[url]http://www.13abc.com/content/news/Jeep-hackers-found-new-scarier-method-389253322.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter_13abc[/url] ([url]http://www.13abc.com/content/news/Jeep-hackers-found-new-scarier-method-389253322.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter_13abc[/url])


Seems like Jeeps have some issues in general with security!

http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/surveillance-video-showing-a-case-of-high-tech-grand-theft-auto (http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/surveillance-video-showing-a-case-of-high-tech-grand-theft-auto)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on August 06, 2016, 09:55:46 AM
I posted something about this bus some time back when it was still in design phase...

Now they have a prototype out on the streets!

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/heres-full-size-working-version-153234100.html (https://www.yahoo.com/tech/heres-full-size-working-version-153234100.html)
Title: Rare 3D View of the Top of Mackinac Bridge Using Google Maps Street View
Post by: BigRedDog on August 11, 2016, 10:17:29 AM
Also some pretty interesting info on the way the camera works!

http://www.michigan.org/blog/outdoors/this-rare-3d-view-of-the-top-of-mackinac-bridge-using-google-maps-street-view-is-mind-blowing/ (http://www.michigan.org/blog/outdoors/this-rare-3d-view-of-the-top-of-mackinac-bridge-using-google-maps-street-view-is-mind-blowing/)

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on August 15, 2016, 11:32:09 PM
Need a friend? This robot wants a family.

https://www.facebook.com/cnbc/videos/10154570196684369/ (https://www.facebook.com/cnbc/videos/10154570196684369/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on August 17, 2016, 11:09:19 PM
How the father of the World Wide Web plans to reclaim it from Facebook and Google.

When the World Wide Web first took off in the mid 1990s, the dream wasn’t just big, it was distributed: Everyone would have their own home page, everyone would post their thoughts – they weren’t called “blogs” until 1999 – and everyone would own their own data, for there was no one around offering to own it for us. The web consisted of nodes joined by links, with no center.

Oh, how times have changed.

Now a handful of companies own vast swaths of web activity – Facebook for social networking, Google for searching, eBay for auctions – and quite literally own the data their users have provided and generated. This gives these companies unprecedented power over us, and gives them such a competitive advantage that it’s pretty silly to think you’re going to start up a business that’s going to beat them at their own game. The fact that Facebook already has the data in 1.7 billion users’ profiles and, more important, the history of its users’ interactions means that you’re probably not going to attract a lot of savvy investors. Plus that’s where all your friend are already. Vendor lock-in is real.

This has inspired an effort to re-decentralize the web. Two of the more important efforts – some would count blockchain as a third contributor – are architecturally very promising. The question is whether architecture will be enough.

The first comes from Tim Berners-Lee who invented the web and gave it to us as a gift, without patents, copyrights, or trademarks. Berners-Lee’s new project, underway at his MIT lab, is called Solid (“social linked data”), a way for you to own your own data while making it available to the applications that you want to be able to use it.


Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/web/ways-to-decentralize-the-web/#ixzz4HeKfTZUC (http://www.digitaltrends.com/web/ways-to-decentralize-the-web/#ixzz4HeKfTZUC)
Follow us: @digitaltrends on Twitter | digitaltrendsftw on Facebook

Title: Google to start punishing pages with pop-up ads on mobile in 2017
Post by: BigRedDog on August 24, 2016, 10:07:42 AM
Google gets it...

when I'm on my phone I don't usually have time and I hate burning up my data plan on advertising...

http://www.wxyz.com/news/google-to-start-punishing-pages-with-pop-up-ads-on-mobile-in-2017 (http://www.wxyz.com/news/google-to-start-punishing-pages-with-pop-up-ads-on-mobile-in-2017)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 13, 2016, 09:07:17 PM
Not sure where this fits. It is technology but also more government bullcrap.
Finding out energy audits being conducted in Toledo and maybe elsewhere in Ohio.   
If your home qualifies (apparently income related) there is an audit performed on your home.  Almost everything that's inefficient is replaced free of charge. Light bulbs up to and including central air.
I have a friend that lives in the slums as he is to stubborn to move.  Almost all of his neighbors in East Toledo are getting everything new..
My appliance repair guy friend says oh yeah,  the whole Dorr street area has already been equipped.. Not just ordinary refrigerators.  The nice double door stainless.. 
I wonder if this is what Michigan utilities is doing with the extra dollar a month they started taking from us a year ago?

 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 13, 2016, 09:45:20 PM
A double door stainless frig, to keep the left over BBQ in and the dope cold...
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 14, 2016, 08:32:02 PM
Austin TX put cameras on some school buses. In 4 months they have issued 6600 tickets at $300 a pop.
Some people bitching it's just a money grab. Really?  What the hell is wrong with people?  Won't even stop for a little kid walking across the street
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 14, 2016, 09:51:20 PM
I love it. They should put one on every bus and ticket each one that doesn't stop.

There's a video on Face Book where a bus driver taped her cell phone to the windowshield and recorded a lot of people running her red lights just on one route.

There was another video looking out the bus doors that showed 3 kids coming out their driveway towards the bus and a car flew through (on the right side) between the kids and the bus and just missed them. The kids fell back into their driveway. They had to have seen them and the lights. A-holes. Ticket them all.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 14, 2016, 11:46:00 PM
Austin TX put cameras on some school buses. In 4 months they have issued 6600 tickets at $300 a pop.
Some people bitching it's just a money grab. Really?  What the hell is wrong with people?  Won't even stop for a little kid walking across the street
I'm guessing someone in authority could pass a County law allowing this...  but usually those "camera" companies get a majority of the $$ if it's anything like the red light camera's.

I'd like to see the police with a sting operation however - similar to seat belt enforcement where they can task a lot of manpower to an area.   might require Drone technology to assist!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 15, 2016, 07:33:29 AM
I'm guessing someone in authority could pass a County law allowing this...  but usually those "camera" companies get a majority of the $$ if it's anything like the red light camera's.

I'd like to see the police with a sting operation however - similar to seat belt enforcement where they can task a lot of manpower to an area.   might require Drone technology to assist!

Probably easy enough to pass the law but not sure where they'll find enough deputies to enforce it without some additional funding.  It appears we are short of deputies at least during certain times of the day (shift change?).

Listening to the fire scanner in the last week or so I heard several instances where firefighters were requesting LE assistance and the reply from central dispatch that there "are no deputies available at this time.  I will get you one as soon as they are available"! 

One was for help shutting down a 4 lane stretch of Telegraph road for a crash scene.  Firefighters need to be taking care of victims without having to be dodging vehicles that don't know enough (or are in too big a hurry) enough to even slow down at a crash site...   much less stop!!!

One was at the time of dispatch of an attempted suicide with a knife...  firefighters were advised to use their own discretion to entering the scene. 

At another scene first responders were advised to be on the lookout (description given) for a passenger that had jumped out of the vehicle after it crashed and was observed running through a corn field.  I'm not sure if that dispatch was just a 'heads up' call of if it was due to a lack of deputies available to assist at the scene :-\ :-\ :-\

I'm guessing that just having more deputies 'visible' on the road would probably discourage some of the aggressive driving I personally see every day.


Just yesterday at the same intersection on Telegraph where there had been a critical crash just the day before I saw one of the most aggressive illegal passes I've seen in a long time.  Looked like it was right off the screen at NASCAR! 

Car heading south on Telegraph turns on signal for left turn at S. Otter Creek...   before the left turn lane begins...  the car following way too close in the first place then made a wide sweep to the right to get around the legally turning car.  The passing car was able to stay on the paved road only by using the wide paved shoulder beyond the solid white line.  Fortunately both were compact sized vehicles but they were squeezed pretty tight together in a 'pinch' point on a bad stretch of road.  I'm thinking there may have been some kind of a run in prior to what I saw.  The worst part was there were 6 or 7 vehicles immediately ahead of them so there was really no where to go anyway!!!

As my youngest daughter noted one day when she was very young...

"You should have left sooner" ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 15, 2016, 11:40:00 PM
Seems to be an awful lot of red light running lately. We were driving South on N. Monroe St. stopping to turn West on Stewart Rd. We got a green arrow so I let off the brake and started to turn when an old lady in a van came flying across Monroe St. and almost hit me. The very next day it happened again this time 3 cars came across when I had a green arrow to turn right. I'm wondering if the light is screwed up.

We constantly see people running red lights on telegraph Rd. I bought a dash cam so I can prove my innocence.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 17, 2016, 10:27:51 AM
it's difficult to see the light turn red when you are looking at your phone.
yeah, I'm not perfect.  I look at txt while i'm driving once in awhile but certainly not at an intersection or near on off ramps..
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2016, 12:30:14 PM
it's difficult to see the light turn red when you are looking at your phone.
yeah, I'm not perfect.  I look at txt while i'm driving once in awhile but certainly not at an intersection or near on off ramps..


Quote
“Last week I watched as a car sat while the light went through a whole cycle,” he said. “People were honking their horns and (the driver) was just zoned out. I’m like, ‘Really?’ It’s amazing what you see when you get out of the patrol car.”

Drivers will get pulled over for texting when stopped at a traffic light, the same citation as texting while moving.


At least one department is doing something pro-active!!!

http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2016/09/17/drivers-stopped-texting-crackdown/90574356/ (http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2016/09/17/drivers-stopped-texting-crackdown/90574356/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 17, 2016, 02:48:26 PM
Without exception, my phone is on hands free in the car...no touch, ever and I never text in the car either.  Hell, I seldom text at home.  My finger tips are too wide.  IMO, there is no excuse for fiddling with a phone while operating a motor vehicle.  The rules that apply to commercial drivers need to apply to ALL drivers.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2016, 02:56:14 PM
Without exception, my phone is on hands free in the car...no touch, ever and I never text in the car either.  Hell, I seldom text at home.  My finger tips are too wide.  IMO, there is no excuse for fiddling with a phone while operating a motor vehicle.  The rules that apply to commercial drivers need to apply to ALL drivers.

Absolutely...

and still, way too often I read after a bad crash that their phone records show the truck driver was texting! 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 17, 2016, 03:00:02 PM
You'd be amazed what I see sitting up there (in a truck) and looking down in cars.  My last episode was a gal drinking a beer in a brown paper bag.  I made a quick 911 call (hands free) and the OHP was waiting up ahead and bagged her.

People do EVERYTHING but drive and most everything distracts attention.  I've seen everything from masturbation (both sexes) to reading a book at 70 mph.

Now, I do like the gals who drive along with their skirts hiked up and one leg propped up in the corner of the door and dash....  especially with no undies on....

People are just plain idiots.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2016, 03:03:49 PM
You'd be amazed what I see sitting up there (in a truck) and looking down in cars.  My last episode was a gal drinking a beer in a brown paper bag.  I made a quick 911 call (hands free) and the OHP was waiting up ahead and bagged her.

People do EVERYTHING but drive and most everything distracts attention.  I've seen everything from masturbation (both sexes) to reading a book at 70 mph.

Now, I do like the gals who drive along with their skirts hiked up and one leg propped up in the corner of the door and dash....  especially with no undies on....

People are just plain idiots.

Would they consider that 'creating a distraction'?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 17, 2016, 03:07:41 PM
Absolutely...

and still, way too often I read after a bad crash that their phone records show the truck driver was texting!

Lets remove (truck driver) shall we?  I'm not saying it never happens but the fine for the first offense is 1500 bucks for the driver, 1500 for the carrier plus a 6 month suspension of the CDL.  Second offense is a 15,000 dollar fine for each carrier and driver and lifetime revocation.

Getting caught is easy.  Every LEO can see in the cab.  Why do you think new trucks have a bright orange overlay on the shoulder harness?  So LE can see if the driver is belted.

The laws states any personal interaction with any electronic device constitutes an infraction of the law, except if the interaction is hands free.

Maybe you mean pickup truck driver in as much as the media today don't discern one truck (pickup / non-commercial) from a commercial truck.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 17, 2016, 03:08:35 PM
Would they consider that 'creating a distraction'?

Probably.  I just look or should I say admire.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2016, 03:15:09 PM
Lets remove (truck driver) shall we?  I'm not saying it never happens but the fine for the first offense is 1500 bucks for the driver, 1500 for the carrier plus a 6 month suspension of the CDL.  Second offense is a 15,000 dollar fine for each carrier and driver and lifetime revocation.

Getting caught is easy.  Every LEO can see in the cab.  Why do you think new trucks have a bright orange overlay on the shoulder harness?  So LE can see if the driver is belted.

The laws states any personal interaction with any electronic device constitutes an infraction of the law, except if the interaction is hands free.

Maybe you mean pickup truck driver in as much as the media today don't discern one truck (pickup / non-commercial) from a commercial truck.

The last one I recall was a semi that crashed into a line of stopped vehicles on the Ohio Turnpike...   

it definitely was a semi truck.  There were fatalities and it was in the news for a week or so.

Still see stories (regularly) of airline pilots trying to get into their planes and fly after they've had too many drinks...

I'm guessing the penalties for that are even stiffer!



Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on September 17, 2016, 03:34:45 PM
The driver on the OTP was speeding and in the wrong lane.  He was in a construction zone (45 mph) with a divided lane restriction (commercial vehicles in the RIGHT LANE ONLY as marked).  I never saw where he was using an electronic communication device at the time of the crash but I might have missed that.  Not with standing, he's guilty of vehicular homicide because he was violating the basic speed law pertaining to a construction zone and he was in the wrong lane...

I'd make a helluva cop wouldn't I....??
Title: Google chrome to mark all http websites as non-secure
Post by: BigRedDog on September 20, 2016, 10:45:59 AM
http://www.wxyz.com/financial-fitness/google-chrome-to-mark-all-http-websites-as-non-secure (http://www.wxyz.com/financial-fitness/google-chrome-to-mark-all-http-websites-as-non-secure)
Title: Re: Google chrome to mark all http websites as non-secure
Post by: BigRedDog on September 21, 2016, 09:06:10 AM
[url]http://www.wxyz.com/financial-fitness/google-chrome-to-mark-all-http-websites-as-non-secure[/url] ([url]http://www.wxyz.com/financial-fitness/google-chrome-to-mark-all-http-websites-as-non-secure[/url])


Not sure if it's related but this morning I see that my address bar (Google Chrome) has an i with a circle around it in front of the website address.  Hover my cursor and I get 'site info'...

Has that been like that and I just happened to notice it?
Title: Yahoo says hackers stole info in 500 million user accounts
Post by: BigRedDog on September 22, 2016, 05:57:54 PM
I have a Yahoo account although I'm not sure I remember how to get into it!  I don't think I have anything critical there although it does say they accessed some info that might benefit them in hacking a current account :( :( :(

http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts (http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 22, 2016, 09:53:46 PM
I have a Yahoo account although I'm not sure I remember how to get into it!  I don't think I have anything critical there although it does say they accessed some info that might benefit them in hacking a current account :( :( :(

[url]http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts[/url] ([url]http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts[/url])


Hopefully you don't use the same user name and password for all your other accounts that you used in your Yahoo account. A lot of people use the same for all their accounts.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 23, 2016, 08:07:34 AM
I have a Yahoo account although I'm not sure I remember how to get into it!  I don't think I have anything critical there although it does say they accessed some info that might benefit them in hacking a current account :( :( :(

[url]http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts[/url] ([url]http://nbc24.com/news/nation-world/yahoo-says-hackers-stole-info-in-500-million-user-accounts[/url])


They were trying to find the secrets of winning fantasy football -   
we do the Monroe Talks league on Yahoo!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on September 23, 2016, 08:11:40 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/22/science/ancient-sea-scrolls-bible.html (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/22/science/ancient-sea-scrolls-bible.html)

Interesting technology to be able to view a rolled up burnt document

We could find some of the worlds ancient works and be able to read/translate
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on September 25, 2016, 11:33:39 PM
Ville de Montréal Look how it's done elsewhere and learn!

https://www.facebook.com/everythingmtl/videos/1216918281660610/ (https://www.facebook.com/everythingmtl/videos/1216918281660610/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on October 12, 2016, 06:17:46 PM
Interesting use of virtual reality modeling software...   it would probably also be a great exhibit for any holocaust museum!

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/germany-uses-vr-model-auschwitz-birkenau-catch-nazis-n660716 (http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/germany-uses-vr-model-auschwitz-birkenau-catch-nazis-n660716)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on October 14, 2016, 09:24:19 AM
If you were flying United this morning it looks like you an slow down and take your time.

All their flights 'worldwide' are delayed due to a computer glitch!

How much longer before some smart younger techie figures out a 'work around' for when something like this happens...

this is the 2nd time for a major airline in the last few weeks!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on October 14, 2016, 11:07:28 PM
If you were flying United this morning it looks like you an slow down and take your time.

All their flights 'worldwide' are delayed due to a computer glitch!

How much longer before some smart younger techie figures out a 'work around' for when something like this happens...

this is the 2nd time for a major airline in the last few weeks!


Probably a Windows 10 update.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on December 29, 2016, 11:24:39 AM
Interesting read IMO, also has a link to market penetration by operating systems.

http://www.wxyz.com/news/facebook-leads-the-pack-in-2016s-top-smartphone-apps (http://www.wxyz.com/news/facebook-leads-the-pack-in-2016s-top-smartphone-apps)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on January 05, 2017, 12:24:22 AM
FUTURE PREDICTIONS:

In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide. Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt. What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years - and most people don't see it coming. Did you think in 1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on paper film again? Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore's law. So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a long time, before it became way superior and got mainstream in only a few short years. It will now happen with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and electric cars, education, 3D printing, agriculture and jobs. Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age.

Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.
Uber is just a software tool, they don't own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the world. Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don't own any properties.

Artificial Intelligence: Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected. In the US, young lawyers already don't get jobs. Because of IBM Watson, you can get legal advice (so far for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans. So if you study law, stop immediately. There will be 90% fewer lawyers in the future, only specialists will remain. Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, 4 times more accurate than human nurses. Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans. By 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans.

Autonomous Cars: In 2018 the first self-driving cars will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You don't want to own a car anymore. You will call a car with your phone, it will show up at your location and drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance and can be productive while driving. Our kids will never get a driver's license and will never own a car. It will change the cities, because we will need 90-95% fewer cars for that. We can transform former parking space into parks. 1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide. We now have one accident every 100,000 km, with autonomous driving that will drop to one accident in 10 million km. That will save a million lives each year.

Most car companies may become bankrupt. Traditional car companies try the evolutionary approach and just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach and build a computer on wheels. I spoke to a lot of engineers from Volkswagen and Audi; they are completely terrified of Tesla.

Insurance Companies will have massive trouble because, without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper. Their car insurance business model will disappear.

Real estate will change. Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighborhood.

Electric cars won’t become mainstream until 2020. Cities will be less noisy because all cars will run on electric. Electricity will become incredibly cheap and clean: Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can only now see the impact. Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil. The price for solar will drop so much that all coal companies will be out of business by 2025.

With cheap electricity comes cheap and abundant water. Desalination now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter. We don't have scarce water in most places, we only have scarce drinking water. Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water as he wants, for nearly no cost.

Health: There will be companies that will build a medical device (called the "Tricorder" from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample and you breathe into it. It then analyses 54 biomarkers that will identify nearly any disease. It will be cheap, so in a few years, everyone on this planet will have access to world-class medicine, nearly for free.

3D printing: The price of the cheapest 3D printer came down from $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it became 100 times faster. All major shoe companies started 3D printing shoes. Spare airplane parts are already 3D printed in remote airports. The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large number of spare parts they used to have in the past.

At the end of this year, new smart phones will have 3D scanning possibilities. You can then 3D scan your feet and print your perfect shoe at home. In China, they already 3D printed a complete 6-storey office building. By 2027, 10% of everything that's being produced will be 3D printed.

Business Opportunities: If you think of a niche you want to go in, ask yourself: "in the future, do you think we will have that?" and if the answer is yes, how can you make that happen sooner? If it doesn't work with your phone, forget the idea. And any idea designed for success in the 20th century is doomed to failure in the 21st century.

Work: 70-80% of jobs will disappear in the next 20 years. There will be a lot of new jobs, but it is not clear if there will be enough new jobs in such a small time.

Agriculture: There will be a $100 agricultural robot in the future. Farmers in 3rd world countries can then become managers of their field instead of working all days on their fields. Agroponics will need much less water. The first Petri dish produced veal is now available and will be cheaper than cow-produced veal in 2018. Right now, 30% of all agricultural surfaces is used for cows. Imagine if we don't need that space anymore. There are several startups that will bring insect protein to the market shortly. It contains more protein than meat. It will be labeled as "alternative protein source" (because most people still reject the idea of eating insects).

There is an app called "moodies" which can already tell in which mood you are. Until 2020 there will be apps that can tell by your facial expressions if you are lying. Imagine a political debate where it's being displayed when they are telling the truth and when not.

Bitcoin will become mainstream this year and might even become the default reserve currency.

Longevity: Right now, the average life span increases by 3 months per year. Four years ago, the life span used to be 79 years, now it's 80 years. The increase itself is increasing and by 2036, there will be more than one year increase per year. So we all might live for a long long time, probably way more than 100.

Education: The cheapest smart phones are already at $10 in Africa and Asia. Until 2020, 70% of all humans will own a smart phone. That means everyone has the same access to world class education.

Robert M. Goldman MD, PhD, DO, FAASP
www.DrBobGoldman.com (http://www.DrBobGoldman.com)
World Chairman-International Medical Commission
Co-Founder & Chairman of the Board-A4M
Founder & Chairman-International Sports Hall of Fame
Co-Founder & Chairman-World Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine
President Emeritus-National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)
Chairman-U.S. Sports Academy’s Board of Visitors
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on January 05, 2017, 10:18:01 AM
Boy,  this took a lot of work digging all these facts out
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on January 05, 2017, 07:49:52 PM
Like Ivory soap, 99/44 100ths., conjecture with a bit of fantasy tossed in....
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on January 05, 2017, 10:50:36 PM
Boy,  this took a lot of work digging all these facts out

It's all the opinion of Robert M. Goldman MD, PhD, DO, FAASP

Besides, it will never happen because people will always find ways to make money off of everything and will never allow anyone to benefit from technology without filling their pockets first. It's the American way.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on January 23, 2017, 06:54:09 PM
Thought this was worth sharing.  There is a 15 sec video clip taken by NOAA that tracks lightening storm path development.  No doubt can see the path they are taking.



https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/01/23/the-first-images-from-goes-r-have-come-in-and-theyre-absolutely-incredible/?utm_term=.f2c1a153d7df (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/01/23/the-first-images-from-goes-r-have-come-in-and-theyre-absolutely-incredible/?utm_term=.f2c1a153d7df)




Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on January 24, 2017, 09:18:34 PM
They have some new pictures of Pluto that are really good.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/new-pluto-images-from-nasa-s-new-horizons-it-s-complicated (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/new-pluto-images-from-nasa-s-new-horizons-it-s-complicated)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on February 04, 2017, 06:02:35 PM
Changes to Gmail. May not work on old computer sofware like vista or XP
https://www.yahoo.com/news/gmail-account-might-stop-working-213558298.html (https://www.yahoo.com/news/gmail-account-might-stop-working-213558298.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on February 25, 2017, 12:08:44 AM
QUANTUM THEORY PROVES CONSCIOUSNESS MOVES TO ANOTHER UNIVERSE AFTER DEATH

http://www.homeplanetearth.org/quantum-theory-proves-consciousness-moves-another-universe-death/ (http://www.homeplanetearth.org/quantum-theory-proves-consciousness-moves-another-universe-death/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on February 25, 2017, 07:43:13 AM
Interesting, but makes some rather spiritual assumptions.  Good read though, thanks.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 25, 2017, 08:59:46 AM
Reminds me of the Lost in Space joke...  Why does the Starship Enterprise circle Uranus?  Looking for Klingon's of course. ;D ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on February 28, 2017, 12:33:41 AM
Interesting, but makes some rather spiritual assumptions.  Good read though, thanks.

If you end up in another universe and have no knowledge of your past then your dead anyways, what's the difference? Does anyone here remember living in another universe?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 28, 2017, 01:55:09 PM
Candidly, I don't give 2 shilts.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on March 01, 2017, 12:11:17 AM
Video of what is going on in a CT Scanner when your are inside it.

If it malfunctions you would be in a giant blender.

http://www.wimp.com/this-is-what-a-ct-scan-looks-like-without-the-guards/ (http://www.wimp.com/this-is-what-a-ct-scan-looks-like-without-the-guards/)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on March 03, 2017, 04:32:15 PM
So cool.....the agility is incredible.  Some fine programming and logic feedback.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/boston-dynamics-new-rolling-robot-is-fierce-161906400.html (http://finance.yahoo.com/news/boston-dynamics-new-rolling-robot-is-fierce-161906400.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 03, 2017, 05:45:07 PM
That is pretty neat to watch.  15 miles on one charge.

Quite a fire in Toledo yesterday.  A Lithium alloy fabricator of some sort.  No water could be used as Lithium reacts with water to form hydrogen gas and the entire area was evacuated for a while due to noxious fumes.

Read this morning that the owner stated they had special fire supression in the plant but it did not function correctly.

I thought it was battery related at first but it wasn't.  The manufacture something lithium related for the glass industry.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on March 03, 2017, 06:23:55 PM
And I know the guy that put the fire suppression sys in. Head scratcher right now.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on April 07, 2017, 10:03:31 PM
1 robot will replace six human jobs, Automation is a 'national emergency' and more on the future of work

Published on April 3, 2017 Featured in: Economy, Editor's Picks, Technology

Caroline Fairchild

You probably saw at least one of the many headlines last week about a new report out about the future impact of automation on the U.S. economy. Most stories focused on one stat: For every robot put in place per thousand workers, up to six workers will lost their jobs and wages will go down. I took a look at the 91 pages of research and pulled out some other key findings:

As many as 57% of jobs could be automated over the next two decades, but this stat assumes automation will be cheaper than human labor, encouraging employers to use it.

The U.S lags behind its European peers in the adoption of robots in the workplace: In the late 2000s, there were 2.6 robots per thousand workers across developed European economies and only 1.4 robots in America per one thousand workers.

Men will likely be impacted more than women by mass adoption of robots: They will likely lose more work, however the decreases in wages for men and women will be the same.

The manufacturing industry will be most impacted by exposure to robots and there will be very few employment increases across other occupations to offset this decrease.

Managers are the only occupation title that the researchers said would not be negatively impacted by robots.

Workers with less than a high school degree, a high school degree and some college will see the most negative impact on employment and wages thanks to robots. The only group not hit in the researchers' exercise was workers with post-college degrees.

Robots in America will quadruple by 2025 to 5.25 more robots per thousand workers leading to a nearly 2 percentage points decrease in employment, according to one very aggressive model.

http://www.nber.org/papers/w23285?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin (http://www.nber.org/papers/w23285?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioslogin)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on April 24, 2017, 12:20:47 AM
When a farmer on a Danish island persuaded conservative locals to "go green," they ended up saving millions of dollars per year in imported fossil fuel energy. Now, the whole world is learning how they did it.

https://www.facebook.com/ChristianScienceMonitor/videos/10155320761344658/ (https://www.facebook.com/ChristianScienceMonitor/videos/10155320761344658/)

This island's solutions to energy production were covered in a TV series called "Islands of the Future". They get a lot of visitors looking to see how it's done, most look like Japenese or Chinese. Soon they will be way ahead of America in clean energy.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on April 27, 2017, 12:10:08 AM
And I know the guy that put the fire suppression sys in. Head scratcher right now.
It would be interesting to learn what system they used and why it failed -
I teach an advanced suppression system course and we cover this type of specialized systems vs your standard sprinkler systems
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 27, 2017, 02:38:02 PM
Speaking of technology, I got a new cell phone (and provider) this week and the phone has more intellegence (and memory) than my laptop[ does) plus it's IP54 rated.  Big issue with cell phones is water.  Not my new one.  It can be submerged in 30 feet of water for 3 minutes without damage.  No touch either (other than powering it up).  I speak to it and it handles everything else..... don't talk back like CL does, either. ;D

Always had an I-Phone.  Not now.

Probably take me a year to figure everything out.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on April 27, 2017, 05:50:35 PM
Fixing your own supper tonight huh
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: CatLady on April 28, 2017, 07:55:17 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 28, 2017, 01:49:21 PM
;D

No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on April 28, 2017, 03:58:02 PM
Speaking of technology, I got a new cell phone (and provider) this week and the phone has more intellegence (and memory) than my laptop[ does) plus it's IP54 rated.  Big issue with cell phones is water.  Not my new one.  It can be submerged in 30 feet of water for 3 minutes without damage.  No touch either (other than powering it up).  I speak to it and it handles everything else..... don't talk back like CL does, either. ;D

Always had an I-Phone.  Not now.

Probably take me a year to figure everything out.

So if you catch a cold and lose your voice does it recognize you?

If you are next to some loud person, TV or Radio will it pick up what they say?  :-\

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on April 29, 2017, 06:11:35 PM
No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D

I smirked when I saw you post it to begin with......I figured that was going to draw some fire from CL. 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: CatLady on April 29, 2017, 07:11:25 PM
No comments from the peanut gallery.... ;D

YOU are the peanut gallery!   ;) ;D 8*
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on April 29, 2017, 07:37:51 PM
It did........ ;D
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on May 01, 2017, 08:27:48 PM
A student who worked in a Chinese iPhone factory explains why manufacturing jobs aren't coming back.

It's going to take a lot more than concrete and machines to manufacture iPhones in the U.S.

CNBC recently spoke with Dejian Zeng, a graduate student at NYU's Wagner School of Public Service, who spent last summer working undercover building iPhones at Pegatron, one of Apple's manufacturing partners.

After returning from the trip, which was organized by NYU and China's Labor Watch, Zeng said he's convinced that U.S. workers aren't going to be shuffling into factories to build iPhones any time soon.

How exactly does a student at a prestigious U.S. university end up in China, sitting quietly on a stool, inserting parts into iPhones, one by one?

Zeng walked CNBC through his decision to spend six weeks in a factory working 12 hours shifts Monday through Saturday, mostly during the night, and what he discovered along the way.

"I just showed up"

It turns out getting into an iPhone factory isn't that hard.

"They just gave me the address of the factory and I just went. I just showed up. When I was there I saw people holding luggage waiting in a long line, so I just stood in the line," Zeng told CNBC in an interview.

"When it was my turn they asked for my ID, asked to see my hand and asked me to recite the English alphabet. I got in after that. It took less than 30 seconds. You don't have to apply or have any skills."

Zeng told CNBC he went to the factory because China Labor Watch was expecting a strike, and it wanted boots on the ground in case a strike occurred to understand how it happened.

Zeng said China Labor Watch had done research and had noticed that, while wages weren't terrible, Pegatron's factory was cutting down the subsidies it offered workers on things like food, which ultimately meant workers were getting paid less. As he phrased it, Pegatron was using a bit of a loophole to save money while also meeting wage labor requirements. Zeng also claims he saw several violations, such as mandatory overtime, which he addressed in an open letter to Apple in March.

Why it can't happen here


Now that he's seen how a Chinese iPhone factory operates, Zeng doesn't believe that Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) or other companies will be able to build competitive factories in the U.S., no matter what politicians want them to do.

"The first thing I can think of from a labor perspective is that the wages are unacceptable for American workers. So, in the factories, I was getting paid about 3100 yuan, or $450, per month. I don't think American workers can accept those kind of wages based on living conditions and prices here," Zeng said.

"Even if they relocate factories to the U.S. they'd replace workers with robots," Zeng said. He said Pegatron already uses robots to apply cameras to iPhones, and to drop batteries into the devices. Robots, Zeng said, are more precise than human workers, and precision is particularly important for those two components.

The only reason human labor is still used, he believes, is because it's cheaper in some cases.

"We are using labor in China instead of a machine because labor is cheaper than maintaining machines. If you relocate factories to the States you need to think of how to manage the workers," Zeng explained.


Even China is getting too expensive

Meanwhile, Zeng also said that factories are starting to appear in other countries where human labor costs are even cheaper than in China.

"China is developing. Prices for food and housing are increasing, so you have to increase wages accordingly. The government set minimum wages, and wages are going up, so [the] cost for labor is going up. Other places like Bangladesh, the wages are really low. They're shutting down factories in China and moving to where labor costs are lower. Factories used to be in America, then they moved to China, and now they're moving over to Vietnam and Bangladesh."


If President Trump wants iPhones manufactured in the U.S., Apple will need to front the cost to pay the much higher wages required in the U.S., which means that consumers will have to be willing to pay more. Either that, or it will have to rely a lot more on machines, which won't create jobs, and might end up taking them.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/student-worked-chinese-iphone-factory-131142489.html
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on May 01, 2017, 09:13:50 PM
So if they pay $450 a month to build phones Apple should have plenty of room to pay more and still make billions selling phones for $800
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tiny on May 01, 2017, 11:49:26 PM
So if they pay $450 a month to build phones Apple should have plenty of room to pay more and still make billions selling phones for $800

They do, I read Apple has 1.4 trillion in cash off shore just sitting, but why would they want to pay more for labor?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on May 02, 2017, 12:03:42 AM
They do, I read Apple has 1.4 trillion in cash off shore just sitting, but why would they want to pay more for labor?
Apple and other corporations aren't "stupid"...   if the US wants to double tax them - they will let it sit or use it elsewhere. 

One of the main targets of tax reform is those Trillions sitting in offshore accounts.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Tim Heiss on May 02, 2017, 03:02:23 AM
So if they pay $450 a month to build phones Apple should have plenty of room to pay more and still make billions selling phones for $800
Why would they?

If you can make more money by having the phones made in Bangladesh or Vietnam, why make them here?
Title: 3M and MDOT partner on nation's first connected work zone on I-75 in Oakland Cou
Post by: BigRedDog on May 24, 2017, 02:44:48 PM
This is interesting...   especially if you drive on 75 up in Oakland County.

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/MIDOT/bulletins/19cb37b
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on May 24, 2017, 03:52:04 PM
Maybe in a hundred years the driverless vehicle thing might pan out but I don't see it happening any sooner.  reason being is the idiots that already inhabit the road aren't going to repsect a driverless automobile at all.  They don't have any respect or courtesy for other drivers now

I, for one, don't want to be tooling down the e-way and look over and see a car with no driver, that would freak me out.

IMO, automakers need to stay focused on fuel efficiency and not driverless cars.  Fuel prices will climb back up, only a matter of time and then the 'guzzlers' won't be worth shitte again.

For me, they ain't worth shitte now.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on May 24, 2017, 08:29:28 PM
They can put a dummy in the drivers seat for driverless vehicles.
Of course there are a bunch of them now
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on May 25, 2017, 07:52:02 AM
They can put a dummy in the drivers seat for driverless vehicles.
Of course there are a bunch of them now

Understatement of the decade there blue2 ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on May 25, 2017, 01:46:35 PM
Maybe in a hundred years the driverless vehicle thing might pan out but I don't see it happening any sooner.  reason being is the idiots that already inhabit the road aren't going to repsect a driverless automobile at all. They don't have any respect or courtesy for other drivers now

I, for one, don't want to be tooling down the e-way and look over and see a car with no driver, that would freak me out.

IMO, automakers need to stay focused on fuel efficiency and not driverless cars.  Fuel prices will climb back up, only a matter of time and then the 'guzzlers' won't be worth shitte again.

For me, they ain't worth shitte now.

I'm sure there will be more than a few 'drivers' who initially make a sport out of dodging over or pulling up behind these vehicles...   probably some more ideas I haven't thought of...

but I also be that once these same 'drivers' realize that these vehicles are video recording everything that goes on around them they'll figure out that the fines and point on their licenses just aren't worth all the effort :o :o :o
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on December 26, 2017, 04:31:47 PM
Lockout wheels on grocery carts.
Kroger on Alexis at Lewis has employed wheel locks on their grocery carts.  You get so far out in the parking lot and the wheels lock.  They had to do it because all the folks across the street in government housing were taking the carts and not returning.  And then they would disappear..
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monroe Native on December 26, 2017, 07:35:51 PM
Lockout wheels on grocery carts.
Kroger on Alexis at Lewis has employed wheel locks on their grocery carts.  You get so far out in the parking lot and the wheels lock.  They had to do it because all the folks across the street in government housing were taking the carts and not returning.  And then they would disappear..

LOL.....

Almost the same technology as invisible fences for the pooch.....

All because people can't help themselves from stealing carts....

https://www.quora.com/How-do-locks-on-the-wheels-of-shopping-carts-work (https://www.quora.com/How-do-locks-on-the-wheels-of-shopping-carts-work)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on December 27, 2017, 09:11:41 AM
Lockout wheels on grocery carts.
Kroger on Alexis at Lewis has employed wheel locks on their grocery carts.  You get so far out in the parking lot and the wheels lock.  They had to do it because all the folks across the street in government housing were taking the carts and not returning.  And then they would disappear..

Those have been around for several years.  The Kroger on S. Monroe had some in their fleet several years ago.  When they did the big remodel they got all new (at least refurbished) carts and I haven't noticed any lately. 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on December 27, 2017, 10:07:03 AM
There are dozens of government housing units across Alexis from that Kroger.  i suspect a number of people don't have access to vehicles so they take the cart home.  But never returned..
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on December 27, 2017, 10:20:50 AM
There are dozens of government housing units across Alexis from that Kroger.  i suspect a number of people don't have access to vehicles so they take the cart home.  But never returned..

My wife finished her Kroger career at the store on Gibraltar Road between Flat Rock and Grosse Ile.   When they built the store it was all part of a planned development with all new homes.  Probably in the $160-200K range when they were built.  They had a similar problem with all the 'health crazed' people walking to the store and then taking the carts home when they left.  You'd drive through the subdivision and see carts parked in all sorts of odd places.

I think people are mostly just lazy no matter how poor or wealthy they are!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on December 27, 2017, 10:39:13 AM
My wife finished her Kroger career at the store on Gibraltar Road between Flat Rock and Grosse Ile.   When they built the store it was all part of a planned development with all new homes.  Probably in the $160-200K range when they were built.  They had a similar problem with all the 'health crazed' people walking to the store and then taking the carts home when they left.  You'd drive through the subdivision and see carts parked in all sorts of odd places.

I think people are mostly just lazy no matter how poor or wealthy they are!

Exactly.  The attitude is...  It's not mine so why take it back.  Kind of like all the plastic milk crates...
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on December 27, 2017, 10:42:46 AM
I just found a new use for the plastic milk crates after all these years.  A 20lb propane tank fits nicely in one and will not tip over in your vehicle..
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on December 27, 2017, 10:54:54 AM
Exactly.  The attitude is...  It's not mine so why take it back.  Kind of like all the plastic milk crates...

I just found a new use for the plastic milk crates after all these years. A 20lb propane tank fits nicely in one and will not tip over in your vehicle..

I keep my eyes open and pick them up when I can.  I've had some that I used outside for so long that they just literally disintegrated.

Yes, perfect for helping to stabilize a 20-30-40 pound propane cylinder.

They work pretty good for sitting on while working out in the garden or yard too.

Just don't sit on them too long or you'll end up with 'waffle butt' 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on December 27, 2017, 11:57:22 AM
I'm sure we all know (but ignore) the fact that they are someone else's property so possessing them is petty theft.  It states that on each one....  I'm guilty as well.  I like the red ones myself.  Waffle butt for sure unless you sit on a cushion....
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Monroe Native on December 27, 2017, 08:00:12 PM
I'm sure we all know (but ignore) the fact that they are someone else's property so possessing them is petty theft.  It states that on each one....  I'm guilty as well.  I like the red ones myself.  Waffle butt for sure unless you sit on a cushion....

I prefer grey!

I forget what brand that is....  but I can tell you what stores they sit behind....  from my youth.

 ;D
Title: With ingestible pill, you can track fart development in real time on your phone
Post by: BigRedDog on January 11, 2018, 05:54:38 PM
The wonders of modern science!!!

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/01/with-ingestible-pill-you-can-track-fart-development-in-real-time-on-your-phone/
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on February 23, 2018, 06:06:41 PM
UPS has ordered several of the Tesla Semi Tractors but they're also working on updating their fleet of package trucks.

They're buying some new vehicles but also having some of their present trucks retro-fitted.

https://electrek.co/2018/02/22/ups-electric-delivery-trucks-workhorse/
Title: Re: With ingestible pill, you can track fart development in real time on your phone
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 23, 2018, 09:52:01 PM
The wonders of modern science!!!

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/01/with-ingestible-pill-you-can-track-fart-development-in-real-time-on-your-phone/

That is neat.  Wonder if it records the stink levels too?
Title: 760-mph Hyperloop transit system considers Detroit-Chicago route
Post by: BigRedDog on February 27, 2018, 09:12:20 AM
I was reading about this in The Blade a few days ago.  Apparently the planning is farther along already on the Cleveland to Chicago project. 

Not sure I'd want to be on the first 'test run'  :-\ :-\ :-\

http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2018/02/hyperloop.html (http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2018/02/hyperloop.html)

(http://image.mlive.com/home/mlive-media/width600/img/news/detroit_impact/photo/hyperlooptt-system-front-viewjpg-4beb4f0fedbd048d.jpg)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 27, 2018, 08:47:25 PM
760 mph is breaking the sound barrier.  I think I'd be hesitant about a first ride as well.  Looks like the route roughly follows the Ohio and Indiana Toll roads.  Not sure what Michigan has to do with it, if at all.  Not sure how they could have a departure every 40 seconds either.  Only way that would work is with no stops between Cleveland and Chicago, IOW, express straight through and that would defeat the purpose.

Both the Indiana and Ohio Toll roads have the necessary rights of way to allow it, but would they?  In reality it would cut into their revenue stream.

Too bad the Interurbans are gone.  That would have been the way to go.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on February 28, 2018, 06:41:05 PM
760 mph is breaking the sound barrier.  I think I'd be hesitant about a first ride as well.  Looks like the route roughly follows the Ohio and Indiana Toll roads.  Not sure what Michigan has to do with it, if at all.  Not sure how they could have a departure every 40 seconds either.  Only way that would work is with no stops between Cleveland and Chicago, IOW, express straight through and that would defeat the purpose.

Both the Indiana and Ohio Toll roads have the necessary rights of way to allow it, but would they?  In reality it would cut into their revenue stream.

Too bad the Interurbans are gone.  That would have been the way to go.

Yes, we had a great system and let it get away. 

I took it that after they have the route complete from Cleveland to Chicago they will then explore adding a line to Detroit too.  What wasn't clear was if would be a line along I-94 maybe or a shorter one that goes down and ties in maybe at Toledo.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on February 28, 2018, 07:29:18 PM
Americas biggest mistake..Abandoning the railroads.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Maverick on March 01, 2018, 09:18:33 AM
Hardly their biggest mistake but point taken !!
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on March 07, 2018, 12:26:46 PM
I prefer grey!

I forget what brand that is....  but I can tell you what stores they sit behind....  from my youth.

 ;D
LOL   my college bookshelf consisted of crates - 2x8 and bricks    I still have some from places no longer in business

Those hyperloop trains may succeed in some area's but the costs will make the tickets prohibitable in most areas...   
Its just another area the Musk is getting free money for research from various agencies right now -  and he's the guy who can't even produce enough of his other products to specs...   
Nope I wouldn't trust his plans either.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on March 07, 2018, 12:32:03 PM
Musk melon is shrewd but still a tool.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on April 03, 2018, 11:53:10 AM
I tried to run CCleaner and it indicated it couldn't find the web site to perform an update.
I found out that CCleaner was moving to a new domain.
I redownloaded the software and then was able to run the scan.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: Professor H on April 05, 2018, 10:59:24 AM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-hlth-new-organ-discovered-0404-story.html (http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-hlth-new-organ-discovered-0404-story.html)

Interesting read - and find...   

New technology found what appears to be another "organ" system in our body! 
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on July 07, 2018, 09:26:33 AM
My Motorola Z spent most of the night downloading the 'update' to Oreo.  I just now finished the update itself.  I'll have to go do some exploring to see what the update has done. 

Usually when it updates then I have to download and install a lot of updates to the apps I have installed. 

Anyone had any issues with Oreo?
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on July 07, 2018, 10:00:55 AM
Only when i eat to many of them
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on July 08, 2018, 08:18:56 AM
Only when i eat to many of them

I have similar issues with anything 'sweet' :) :) :)

So far I haven't had any major issues.  Several of the apps and links all shuffled around.  I really haven't gotten into looking for what the upgrade actually does.
Title: Michigan mobile game makes players dodge potholes, deer and construction
Post by: BigRedDog on August 06, 2018, 07:24:47 PM
I wasn't sure where to put this but I guess it goes on your phone so it's for sure 'technology' related!

https://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/michigan_mobile_game_makes_pla.html (https://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/michigan_mobile_game_makes_pla.html)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 08, 2018, 11:05:53 AM
While I was in the Army we had the RedEye should fired missiles which were eventually upgraded to the Stinger missile system.  Some of those are still shoulder fired although they were also put in pods and mounted on mobile units.  They were reaching the end of their life span but with the advent of drone warfare it became vital that front line troops have a mobile and personal anti drone capability.  Rather than develop new it was decided to upgrade the Stinger system.

https://www.defensenews.com/land/2018/09/07/us-army-close-to-green-lighting-extra-lethal-stinger-missiles/ (https://www.defensenews.com/land/2018/09/07/us-army-close-to-green-lighting-extra-lethal-stinger-missiles/)

Here's a video of an older Stinger shoulder fired missile in action.  Just an FYI...

if your neighbor is out playing with one of these don't just walk up behind it to see what's going on...  you may get the surprise of your life!

FIM 92 Stinger MANPADS Surface-To-Air Missile Shoots Down Drone (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kM7hlPFU4g#)

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on September 16, 2018, 10:15:57 PM
Neat use for drones.

https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/2018/09/15/drone-army-is-ready-to-swoop-in-for-florence-power-recovery#gs.m1RocaU (https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/2018/09/15/drone-army-is-ready-to-swoop-in-for-florence-power-recovery#gs.m1RocaU)
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2018, 09:10:22 AM
Neat use for drones.

https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/2018/09/15/drone-army-is-ready-to-swoop-in-for-florence-power-recovery#gs.m1RocaU (https://www.bloombergquint.com/business/2018/09/15/drone-army-is-ready-to-swoop-in-for-florence-power-recovery#gs.m1RocaU)

Interesting how we've seen the overall technology evolve and develop in just a few short years.  Many wrote them off as a 'toy' but look what all they are doing with them now to include Fire, EMS, LE and the military! 

And also still a great toy (if not misused).

In 20 years (or less) they'll be zipping around delivering pizza and little spring you need from the hardware and who knows what else!?

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 17, 2018, 09:13:33 AM
Wow,53 drone teams called in.  Talk about an explosion of an industry..
I know a kid that was in the Air Force for 4 years doing something fairly technical. He's out now and working for a drone company and he flys with the Air Force.  That's about all the info I get and that may have been more than what he should have told me
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 17, 2018, 09:15:20 AM
The government will have to map out drone highways to avoid collisions
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: BigRedDog on September 17, 2018, 09:35:55 AM
The government will have to map out drone highways to avoid collisions

Already seeing collision avoidance tech on the ones my son flies.  That will advance quickly as well and the government will eventually keep them separated by elevation and pretty much like you say 'drone highways'. 

I'm sure there will be some comical collisions...   the day when my box of shredded wheat gets hit by your half gallon of milk!!!

Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on September 17, 2018, 10:03:04 AM
Somebody will have breakfast then
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: The Fuzz on September 17, 2018, 06:17:37 PM
One would think that local LE and government agencies would sell off most of their helicopter fleets and buy drones for surveillance and tracking.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on October 04, 2018, 01:01:23 PM
Probably won't because the depreciation curve on used aircraft is steep, especially second hand surplus ones.  Kallatta's yard up north is loaded with old aircraft.

When I taught at Owens, I took a truck up there and got a load of airline seats that Owens wanted for something and Kalatta was more than happy to get rid of them.  Lots of old obsolete non flying junk there.

Like the MWRAP's the government gave them away because the maintenance aspect was terrible so, give them to municipalities to take care of.  Problem is, there are no replacement parts available.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on November 06, 2018, 03:57:42 PM
I have one of those Apple 6s phones that Apple slowly decreases life of the battery to where mine only held a charge for 4-5 hours.  A friend told me Apple replaced his battery for $30 and it's like new again.  So I had Apple replace mine yesterday.  The battery will not take a charge.  Prob stuck an old one in.  Have an appointment to take it back Wed at noon.  Awful nice of them to give me a bad batt then make me wait 2 days to check it
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 06, 2018, 06:21:23 PM
I have one of those Apple 6s phones that Apple slowly decreases life of the battery to where mine only held a charge for 4-5 hours.  A friend told me Apple replaced his battery for $30 and it's like new again.  So I had Apple replace mine yesterday.  The battery will not take a charge.  Prob stuck an old one in.  Have an appointment to take it back Wed at noon.  Awful nice of them to give me a bad batt then make me wait 2 days to check it

Can't you replace the battery yourself?  I want a Galaxy Note but I'm too cheap to buy one.  I'm very happy with Boost 30 bucks a month 4G unlimited calling, text and data.
Title: Re: Science & Technology
Post by: blue2 on November 06, 2018, 10:40:53 PM
Yeah I could have ordered a battery from Apple but I was near the mall so I stopped