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Categories => Just Asking => Topic started by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 09:53:22 AM

Title: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 09:53:22 AM
Yesterday morning I saw a piece of equipment go by on a semi trailer.  It appeared to be a small corn silage chopper...   self propelled.  It looked like a small combine but had a distinct 3 row head on it.  None of it appeared to be hanging off the side of the trailer so I don't think it was much over 100" wide.  It was painted a blue that was kind of close to 'New Holland' blue but the whole piece of equipment was that one color except a name on it in white letters...   and that's my question...  I didn't quite catch the name.  What I thought I read was "Alamo" but I've googled that and don't find a thing.  It looked like it was brand new so maybe it's an import of some kind.  Although the head was distinct corn silage chopper I don't remember seeing a discharge tube although maybe they had it removed for transport due to height. 

Any ideas...   who is building nice 'blue' ag equipment?

Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Maverick on October 31, 2014, 10:26:27 AM
The only blue one I could find was a Mengela but it was older
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: The Fuzz on October 31, 2014, 10:28:54 AM
Isn't New Holland equipment blue as well?
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 10:44:30 AM
The only blue one I could find was a Mengela but it was older

I went and looked that up and definitely nothing like that...  this was pretty 'streamlined' and modern looking.  There wasn't a scratch on it or any mud or anything so I'm pretty sure it was either brand new or just freshly painted.  I'll keep my eyes open for it again out in a field...  it should be pretty easy to spot!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Maverick on October 31, 2014, 11:23:22 AM
http://www.weissmcnair.com/store/product/66721/Magnum-X-Self-Propelled-Harvester (http://www.weissmcnair.com/store/product/66721/Magnum-X-Self-Propelled-Harvester)

Random guessing
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 12:57:39 PM
[url]http://www.weissmcnair.com/store/product/66721/Magnum-X-Self-Propelled-Harvester[/url] ([url]http://www.weissmcnair.com/store/product/66721/Magnum-X-Self-Propelled-Harvester[/url])

Random guessing


Right color but other than that 'no match'!!!  Thanks for looking though.  Someday I'll see it working in a field or sitting in a yard and I'll get a few pictures of it!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Deanna on October 31, 2014, 01:39:03 PM
Only thing I could find so far is a knapsack harvesters and Zhejiang Liulin Machinery sorry no help
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on October 31, 2014, 04:21:27 PM
My neighbors all have green and a few red...   nothing blue around here
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Skittelroo on October 31, 2014, 05:42:24 PM
maybe this page will give you a clue, BRD.  there is a pic of a blue tractor, and it says they have "Alamo" parts.... .

http://www.messicks.com/AlamoParts.aspx (http://www.messicks.com/AlamoParts.aspx)
-------
or this one
http://www.alamo-industrial.com (http://www.alamo-industrial.com)

Alamo Industrial® is one of the world's largest manufacturers of tractor-mounted mowers, brush-cutters, and land-clearing equipment. Made for right-of-way clearing, roadside vegetation management and grounds maintenance, our line of mowing products and parts cuts the competition down to size!


The Alamo Industrial line includes rotary, flail, and sickle bar mowers known over the years as Mott®, Terrain King®, and Triumph®.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: The Fuzz on October 31, 2014, 05:51:54 PM
Looks impressive enough to pick up strippers in it.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question? SOLVED!!!
Post by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 06:44:16 PM
I was just about ready to leave to go do some running this afternoon and I heard a semi truck going down the road...  looked and I immediately thought "that's the truck that delivered the 'mystery' machine"!

And then about 2 minutes later here came another semi...   looked identical to the first one!  I was about out the door so I hurried and followed this 2nd one.  Finally caught up to it and saw it backing into a farm...   looked in the field and there was the 'mystery' machine...  in fact...  there were two of them!!! 

I talked to one of the truck drivers and he said they were 'seed plot harvesters' which are able to run several 'tests' right in the field.  I asked what kind of tests and he said that it could calculate the moisture content and the grain per acre...  he said it could do some other stuff too but he really wasn't sure what all...  he just drives the truck that delivers the machines and picks the up when they're done.  The trucks were from near Parma (Jackson County) and the company that does the testing is out of Mason, MI.  I did notice there were some vehicles there with 'Monsanto' on the side. 

Anyway, even though I described it as having a 'corn' head in this case they were doing beans!

Anyway...  it wasn't 'Alamo' on the side but rather it said Almaco...  they're built out in Iowa!  They have some used units from 1981 for sale so I guess they've been around a long time!

I took a few pictures but I'll have to get them out of the camera.  Here's their website:

http://www.almaco.com/products/products.cfm?ProductCategoryID=5 (http://www.almaco.com/products/products.cfm?ProductCategoryID=5)

Wow...  I can't believe all the response I got this thread :o :o :o
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Skittelroo on October 31, 2014, 10:00:44 PM
Good detective skills there, BRD!  You should be a PI.  ;D   Nice work
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on October 31, 2014, 10:02:52 PM
Good detective skills there, BRD!  You should be a PI.  ;D   Nice work

Probably what I should have done was just followed it when I saw it going yesterday and they I would have known what it was...   I just knew it was something I'd never seen before!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 01, 2014, 01:47:30 AM
The seed corn op doen the road has a huge one but it's yellow.  Has a corn head on the front like a combine, but thats whrere the resemblance ends....
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 01, 2014, 10:12:40 AM
Here's a video I found about the company.  They build (apparently almost hand build) low volume research equipment:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpKu-yBBtkM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpKu-yBBtkM#)


Here's one doing corn...   I'm glad they're only doing a test plot because it would take forever to do an 80 acre field as slow as it moves.  Near the end you can see it doing some of the tests right in the field:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DN4veerzDU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DN4veerzDU#)


Here's one where they're doing wheat.  I remember my Dad had a combine he'd tow with the tractor...   probably not much bigger than this one.  It had a platform on the side where you could bag the grain rather than put it into a wagon or truck in bulk. 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeOkIKrY8-E (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeOkIKrY8-E#)


I remember now when they were planting the test plots they had a machine that looked a lot like this one:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxDqyUdutLw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxDqyUdutLw#)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 01, 2014, 10:21:40 AM
These are the pictures I took yesterday...  didn't have my good camera with me so had to use my video camera on 'still' mode...  it doesn't take the best pictures in the world :( :( :(

The first three pictures are the machine I saw being delivered.  I didn't see the other one go by.  Lucky I didn't see one going and the other going back...  I would have thought it 'shrunk after use' ;) ;) ;)

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00592_zpsc149ffc9.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00592_zpsc149ffc9.jpg.html)


(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00593_zps70cc2f19.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00593_zps70cc2f19.jpg.html)

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00594_zps39acf543.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00594_zps39acf543.jpg.html)

Here are a couple of the smaller machine:

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00595_zps301148ff.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00595_zps301148ff.jpg.html)

(http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00596_zps972671d0.jpg) (http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00596_zps972671d0.jpg.html)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 01, 2014, 11:41:00 AM
Those are corn heads.  Sileage is chopped, not combined.  Jason's (Legacy Seed's) machine is a Pix-All.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 01, 2014, 11:50:14 AM
Those are corn heads.  Sileage is chopped, not combined.  Jason's (Legacy Seed's) machine is a Pix-All.

Easy to see that now...   I saw the machine go by at about 40 mph and was looking at it strictly from the side.  The small size was making me thing silage and the name on the side is what I was trying to see.

And they may both have corn heads on them but they used them to harvest soybean plots!!!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 01, 2014, 02:58:48 PM
Change the head.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on November 02, 2014, 10:29:33 AM
Unless they planted the soybeans in rows with a corn planter to keep them cleaner and separated - for testing reasons...
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 02, 2014, 08:16:14 PM
A planter is a planter, corn beans, wheat...all the same planter.  You change the feed paramters and the spacing, thats all.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on November 02, 2014, 09:12:20 PM
I suppose with the new technology -

When I was learning we had a corn planter for corn -

and a grain drill for beans and wheat...    Two different machines
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on November 03, 2014, 07:57:06 AM
I suppose with the new technology -

When I was learning we had a corn planter for corn -

and a grain drill for beans and wheat...    Two different machines


Most farmers still plant that way.  Corn is typically a row-planter in 30 inch rows.  Beans are planted with a drill, in 7 to 10 inch rows, or with a different row-planter, in 15, 20 or 30 inch rows.  There is also a wide variety of dual row planters for beans, that gives you a dual row, 8 to 10 inches apart, and those dual rows are 30 inches apart.  Lots of variety out there these days.  Wheat is almost always planted with a drill, in 7 to 10 inch rows.



These are the pictures I took yesterday... 

([url]http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac260/bigreddog1/DSC00595_zps301148ff.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://s905.photobucket.com/user/bigreddog1/media/DSC00595_zps301148ff.jpg.html[/url])




These pictures that BRD provided are not of a combine with a corn head.  That head is used for beans.

If you look closely at the gathering chains, there aren't any!  Lol
The feeding mechanism is totally different than a corn head, and I looked on their website to make sure, and the corn head they do make looks very different from this.  This head is their all-purpose head, which is used for soybeans.  My guess is that this head design (as opposed to a standard cutter bar) helps to eliminate harvesting stray weeds, and helps to recover plants that have fallen over.  They also make a cutter bar head, that I assume they use for wheat.

Many years ago, John Deere used to make a soybean header for their combines, that looked like a corn head with the pointy snouts, but was used strictly for harvesting soybeans planted in rows.  If memory serves me right, those were 20 inch rows.  I think that was an experiment that never caught on, though.






Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 03, 2014, 08:06:09 AM


These pictures that BRD provided are not of a combine with a corn head.  That head is used for beans.

If you look closely at the gathering chains, there aren't any!  Lol
The feeding mechanism is totally different than a corn head, and I looked on their website to make sure, and the corn head they do make looks very different from this.  This head is their all-purpose head, which is used for soybeans.  My guess is that this head design (as opposed to a standard cutter bar) helps to eliminate harvesting stray weeds, and helps to recover plants that have fallen over.  They also make a cutter bar head, that I assume they use for wheat.

Many years ago, John Deere used to make a soybean header for their combines, that looked like a corn head with the pointy snouts, but was used strictly for harvesting soybeans planted in rows.  If memory serves me right, those were 20 inch rows.  I think that was an experiment that never caught on, though.

Glad to hear that livewire...   I was starting to doubt what I had seen (and photographed)!  I was about ready to drive back over there and see if maybe there were some nearby test plots of corn they had been harvesting...   but I didn't remember seeing any corn plots!

Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 03, 2014, 08:13:20 AM
Most farmers still plant that way.  Corn is typically a row-planter in 30 inch rows.  Beans are planted with a drill, in 7 to 10 inch rows, or with a different row-planter, in 15, 20 or 30 inch rows.  There is also a wide variety of dual row planters for beans, that gives you a dual row, 8 to 10 inches apart, and those dual rows are 30 inches apart.  Lots of variety out there these days.  Wheat is almost always planted with a drill, in 7 to 10 inch rows.


Did any of you ever see (bonus points if you used one) a trip cable planter?

I only ever recall seeing one up in our area.  You'd have to string a cable across the field.  The cable had a ball on it every 30" (most likely) that would 'trip' the planter.  That way you ended up with equally spaced rows 'both directions' and you could cultivate across the field at right angles so you ended up with really clean fields.  Remember, this was before the days of 'Esteron 99'!!!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on November 03, 2014, 08:38:23 PM
Did any of you ever see (bonus points if you used one) a trip cable planter?

I only ever recall seeing one up in our area.  You'd have to string a cable across the field.  The cable had a ball on it every 30" (most likely) that would 'trip' the planter.  That way you ended up with equally spaced rows 'both directions' and you could cultivate across the field at right angles so you ended up with really clean fields.  Remember, this was before the days of 'Esteron 99'!!!

Never even heard of such a thing, Dawg!!!  Many years ago, I had a little truck farm, and I would do that with tomatoes, melons, and squash.  But I did it by hand!!  lol
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 03, 2014, 09:23:36 PM
Never even heard of such a thing, Dawg!!!  Many years ago, I had a little truck farm, and I would do that with tomatoes, melons, and squash.  But I did it by hand!!  lol


Took me a bit to find the info...  it's called 'check' planting because it will look like a checkerboard when it's all planted and cultivated and growing.

Article:

http://www.farmcollector.com/implements/check-row-planting-by-the-book.aspx#axzz3I3vB26pZ (http://www.farmcollector.com/implements/check-row-planting-by-the-book.aspx#axzz3I3vB26pZ)

Here's a youtube: 


www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTP_qYzvKZs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTP_qYzvKZs#)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 03, 2014, 09:34:26 PM
A couple more youtubes:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3Jch8_KwJk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3Jch8_KwJk#)

I'll bet there are still some of those stakes out in some barns that no one knows what they're for :o :o :o

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAJitXZ1Pxw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAJitXZ1Pxw#)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 09, 2014, 07:12:30 PM
Here's one I found 'online' so I can't just cruise around the county and get the answer...

another harvester with a fancy header on it...

I've never seen one in a Monroe County field but if I did I'd probably stop and take a few pictures ;) ;) ;)

Anyone know for sure what it is :o :o :o

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/28/Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG/800px-Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 09, 2014, 07:36:10 PM
Here's another one I wonder about...  obviously in Germany (you can see a flag in the background)...

what does that fancy steel tubing 'extension' on the wheel do ??? ??? ???

Sorry the picture is so big...  you have to slide over to see what I'm looking at!!!

(http://i.4cdn.org/hr/1415348685662.jpg)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Viper52 on November 09, 2014, 07:45:58 PM
Here's one I found 'online' so I can't just cruise around the county and get the answer...

another harvester with a fancy header on it...

I've never seen one in a Monroe County field but if I did I'd probably stop and take a few pictures ;) ;) ;)

Anyone know for sure what it is :o :o :o

([url]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/28/Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG/800px-Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG[/url])


Here's a link for you BRD.


http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc (http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on November 09, 2014, 08:04:02 PM
Here's another one I wonder about...  obviously in Germany (you can see a flag in the background)...

what does that fancy steel tubing 'extension' on the wheel do ??? ??? ???

Sorry the picture is so big...  you have to slide over to see what I'm looking at!!!

([url]http://i.4cdn.org/hr/1415348685662.jpg[/url])


The only thing I could think that that steel tubing is for is for additional flotation, if they get into some soft muck.  Never seen anything like it around here... perhaps that is the European version of duals?
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 09, 2014, 08:05:36 PM
Here's a link for you BRD.


[url]http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc[/url] ([url]http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc[/url])


Thanks Viper...  great find on the video...   really neat how that fancy header just folds up!!!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 09, 2014, 08:08:45 PM
The only thing I could think that that steel tubing is for is for additional flotation, if they get into some soft muck.  Never seen anything like it around here... perhaps that is the European version of duals?

That thought did cross my mind but I just don't see it doing much in our kind of mud... 

I was stationed right out in farm country and I don't remember seeing anything like it when I was there.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: sammy on November 09, 2014, 08:30:12 PM
Here's one I found 'online' so I can't just cruise around the county and get the answer...

another harvester with a fancy header on it...

I've never seen one in a Monroe County field but if I did I'd probably stop and take a few pictures ;) ;) ;)

Anyone know for sure what it is :o :o :o

([url]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/28/Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG/800px-Claas_combine_harvesters%2C_2008.JPG[/url])
That's not even a big one. I f you go to youtube, you can find harvesters like that chopping 20 rows at a time. It's absolutely amazing.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 09, 2014, 09:01:25 PM
Here's a link for you BRD.


[url]http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc[/url] ([url]http://www.netherlands.claas.com/cl-pw-en/products/forage-harvesters/jaguar980-930-hrc[/url])


Thats a stalk or forage chopper. Claas isn't too populat around here.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 12, 2014, 09:52:29 AM
Thats a stalk or forage chopper. Claas isn't too populat around here.

I see a few of them around here...  not as many as JD or CaseIH but the number does seem to be growing! 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on November 12, 2014, 02:34:33 PM
I think the nearest dealer is Rosebush......

Kuhn on the other hand is s a shrewd player.  Thy have partenered with JD so many JD products are Kuhn collaborated.

I'll stick with NH and Kubby.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on November 13, 2014, 10:30:08 AM
I think the nearest dealer is Rosebush......

Kuhn on the other hand is s a shrewd player.  Thy have partenered with JD so many JD products are Kuhn collaborated.

I'll stick with NH and Kubby.

I didn't know anyone else in Monroe County knew where Rosebush is... 

I've seen some of their equipment over at a dealer in Liberty Center in the state that's round on both ends and tall in the middle ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on November 20, 2014, 10:00:59 AM
I guess there is a use for them old green machines  ;D

#Recycle#Green#

(http://www.captions9.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/funny-couples-on-motorcycle-5-300x200.jpg)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 24, 2015, 10:45:22 AM

The only thing I could think that that steel tubing is for is for additional flotation, if they get into some soft muck.  Never seen anything like it around here... perhaps that is the European version of duals?


I've been keeping my eyes open and I found this picture on Wiki...

appears that it is a wheel used in the mud...

not sure what they're farming like that though...

rice maybe...  cranberries grow in a flooded field too.

I know there is a small area up around Saginaw where I think it's mint they grow in the bottomlands!

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f3/Tractor_fanguejant.jpg)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Viper52 on January 24, 2015, 11:51:19 AM
Check this one out. It's called an Octopus.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=84503534&x-yt-ts=1421914688&v=c7CFzDepXfM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=84503534&x-yt-ts=1421914688&v=c7CFzDepXfM)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 24, 2015, 11:53:23 AM
Check this one out. That's a monster! It's called an Octopus

 ([url]http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=e76_1421829623[/url])


The video isn't showing up on my monitor so I'm linking direct to the YouTube:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7CFzDepXfM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7CFzDepXfM#)

Maybe this is why the MCRC is auctioning off some of their old equipment...

they're going to replace four tractors with one of these!!!

In reality this would work great in more open areas...   

they'd be all day getting around mailboxes and driveway culverts around here ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 24, 2015, 11:54:24 AM
Check this one out. It's called an Octopus.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=84503534&x-yt-ts=1421914688&v=c7CFzDepXfM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=84503534&x-yt-ts=1421914688&v=c7CFzDepXfM)

Sorry...   I see you saw what was wrong and fixed it before I did ;) ;) ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on January 24, 2015, 11:59:02 AM
I've been keeping my eyes open and I found this picture on Wiki...

appears that it is a wheel used in the mud...

not sure what they're farming like that though...

rice maybe...  cranberries grow in a flooded field too.

I know there is a small area up around Saginaw where I think it's mint they grow in the bottomlands!

([url]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f3/Tractor_fanguejant.jpg[/url])



Looks like some of my fields!!!!  Lol
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 24, 2015, 12:05:23 PM

Looks like some of my fields!!!!  Lol

Well there's a pattern to be making some new wheels for your tractors!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on January 24, 2015, 06:11:06 PM
The video isn't showing up on my monitor so I'm linking direct to the YouTube:

[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7CFzDepXfM]www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7CFzDepXfM[/url] ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7CFzDepXfM#[/url])

Maybe this is why the MCRC is auctioning off some of their old equipment...

they're going to replace four tractors with one of these!!!

In reality this would work great in more open areas...   

they'd be all day getting around mailboxes and driveway culverts around here ;) ;) ;)


It looks like you have to have 5 employees however  - the driver/supervisor and 4 to each operate one of the "arms"... 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on January 24, 2015, 07:39:28 PM
Looks like an old Massey too.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on June 04, 2015, 06:22:00 PM
Now this is a new one on me...

and it's actually direct from the Deere & Company website ;) ;) ;)

(https://www.deere.com/common/media/images/parts/agriculture/nmb-cornfield-522x302.jpeg)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: sammy on June 04, 2015, 06:48:06 PM
Now this is a new one on me...

and it's actually direct from the Deere & Company website ;) ;) ;)

(https://www.deere.com/common/media/images/parts/agriculture/nmb-cornfield-522x302.jpeg)
And the grain goes in the back seat.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on June 04, 2015, 10:52:57 PM
And the grain goes in the back seat.
At the price of corn - letting it go back to seed for next year may be the Deere Plan
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on June 04, 2015, 11:17:32 PM
At the price of corn - letting it go back to seed for next year may be the Deere Plan

I think it needs to be dormant for about a decade.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on July 17, 2015, 02:35:46 PM
Saw a parade of antique tractors go up the road and back down again...  the last pass heading towards the fairgrounds most likely
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on July 17, 2015, 04:23:19 PM
The antique tractor show is there this weekend.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on July 17, 2015, 04:54:38 PM
Tried to fix it.  :-\

(http://i868.photobucket.com/albums/ab249/ka8ebi/Monroe%20Talks/green%20car_zpspvl8kgf5.jpg)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 17, 2015, 05:15:45 PM
Tried to fix it.  :-\

([url]http://i868.photobucket.com/albums/ab249/ka8ebi/Monroe%20Talks/green%20car_zpspvl8kgf5.jpg[/url])


No matter what you do, it's still JD....I've never been fond of JD.  Overpriced and underperforming IMO.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on July 17, 2015, 11:23:54 PM
Agree
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: sammy on July 17, 2015, 11:26:56 PM
No matter what you do, it's still JD....I've never been fond of JD.  Overpriced and underperforming IMO.
JD always been good to me.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 18, 2015, 08:36:20 AM
One of the reasons there are still a few different companies producing farm equipment. 

The history of farm equipment production over the years is almost as confusing as studying the old railroads.  Bankruptcy and merger was an almost daily event.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: arpydave on July 18, 2015, 11:02:29 AM
JD always been good to me.

Same here. I can't recall a time with a JD that didn't turn out good from my perspective.  After about a pint of JD I felt like I was the badest mo-fo in the place.

My ex-wife says it just made me obnoxious. Guess thàt's why she-s an EX-wife. Guess that's why I don't run with a JD no more. :'(
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: The Fuzz on July 18, 2015, 12:25:58 PM
LOL
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 18, 2015, 11:16:12 PM
One of the reasons there are still a few different companies producing farm equipment. 

The history of farm equipment production over the years is almost as confusing as studying the old railroads.  Bankruptcy and merger was an almost daily event.

Not that I'd own one except maybe to pull a haywagon, my favorite brand/model is the Raymond Lowey designed Farmall.  Lowey gave the farm tractor some styling.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 19, 2015, 08:48:44 AM
Not that I'd own one except maybe to pull a haywagon, my favorite brand/model is the Raymond Lowey designed Farmall.  Lowey gave the farm tractor some styling.

They started production on those in 1939 I believe.  My son has a 1949 (as close as we can narrow it down...  serial # plate is corroded bad) Farmall H.  Similar tractor to what my Dad had when I was a kid on the farm.  He actually had two of them before he had to go a little bigger and ended up with a couple of Allis Chalmers...   A WD-45 and a D-14.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 19, 2015, 09:08:59 AM
This is actually more of a farm 'operation' question... 

Looks like they're just either spraying something but more likely they're injecting anhydrous ammonia.  My question is why do they appear to 'skip' a few feet between swaths?

This is actually down just south of Toledo Express airport and we were driving right in that area.  If you drag the map up just a couple of hundred feet you'll see what I was checking out.  It's the old 'Wabash Cannonball' railroad heading from Indiana over to Toledo.  This stretch has been converted (well, at least it's in the process) to a rail trail.  I want to take the mountain bikes (we've had them 10 years and never been close to a mountain with them) and ride at least part of the route.  It's over 60 miles so may have to do it in a couple of visits.

 https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4779868,-83.9131048,130m/data= (https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4779868,-83.9131048,130m/data=)!3m1!1e3!5m1!1e3
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on July 20, 2015, 04:34:22 PM
Maybe their GPS unit needs adjusting.  8*
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on July 20, 2015, 08:42:14 PM
This is actually more of a farm 'operation' question... 

Looks like they're just either spraying something but more likely they're injecting anhydrous ammonia.  My question is why do they appear to 'skip' a few feet between swaths?

This is actually down just south of Toledo Express airport and we were driving right in that area.  If you drag the map up just a couple of hundred feet you'll see what I was checking out.  It's the old 'Wabash Cannonball' railroad heading from Indiana over to Toledo.  This stretch has been converted (well, at least it's in the process) to a rail trail.  I want to take the mountain bikes (we've had them 10 years and never been close to a mountain with them) and ride at least part of the route.  It's over 60 miles so may have to do it in a couple of visits.

 https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4779868,-83.9131048,130m/data= (https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4779868,-83.9131048,130m/data=)!3m1!1e3!5m1!1e3


That is a standard 12 row anhydrous applicator.  If you look closely, their are 11 injection knives, to go between 12 rows of corn.  When the tractor turns around on the headland, they line up with the center of the next 12 rows, essentially skipping a row of corn.  Sort of.  There are two rows of corn between each pass, with no fertilizer between those two rows. This is the gap you see.  The corn in those two rows did get their dose of Nitrogen though, from the end knife in the applicator, but only from one side of the corn row.  That's the only way to do it, unless they had 13 knives, but then they would be applying Nitrogen twice in the end rows.

I probably didn't explain that very well...  Does that make sense, BRD?  Any questions?
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 20, 2015, 09:01:27 PM
They started production on those in 1939 I believe.  My son has a 1949 (as close as we can narrow it down...  serial # plate is corroded bad) Farmall H.  Similar tractor to what my Dad had when I was a kid on the farm.  He actually had two of them before he had to go a little bigger and ended up with a couple of Allis Chalmers...   A WD-45 and a D-14.

When we firstmoved here many. many years ago, I brought with me a 1949 Farmall A widefront dual fuel.  It  had an L59 Woods belly mower and while good for mowing the lawn, that was about it.

Old tractors are fun if you have the time and don't wamt to do real work.  Thats not me.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 20, 2015, 09:34:02 PM

That is a standard 12 row anhydrous applicator.  If you look closely, their are 11 injection knives, to go between 12 rows of corn.  When the tractor turns around on the headland, they line up with the center of the next 12 rows, essentially skipping a row of corn.  Sort of.  There are two rows of corn between each pass, with no fertilizer between those two rows. This is the gap you see.  The corn in those two rows did get their dose of Nitrogen though, from the end knife in the applicator, but only from one side of the corn row.  That's the only way to do it, unless they had 13 knives, but then they would be applying Nitrogen twice in the end rows.

I probably didn't explain that very well...  Does that make sense, BRD?  Any questions?
I see you changed one but missed the other.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 20, 2015, 09:42:00 PM
I see you changed one but missed the other.

Their or there read the same anyway.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 20, 2015, 09:43:24 PM
Their or there read the same anyway.
To an ignorant person perhaps.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 21, 2015, 08:00:12 AM
I probably didn't explain that very well...  Does that make sense, BRD?  Any questions?

That makes perfect sense. 

Now that I see what you're saying I realize there is corn already planted in the field but it doesn't show from the aerial photo.  I've watched them apply anhydrous around here but I guess I never looked at it from the air.  The pattern on the ground wasn't meshing with my mind.

Maybe their GPS unit needs adjusting.  8*

The perfectly parallel lines is what first caught my eye.  I grew up planting on the old 'H' and the front steering was well past it's prime.  It wouldn't go in a straight line for anything.  My Dad always explained it that your could get more corn in a crooked row ;) ;) ;)

Back then we would cultivate the corn.  Our cultivators had side shields to mount on the tractor but my Dad preferred to just 'go slow' and let the dirt push up closer to the corn.  Even then I wasn't into going 'slow' for anything (I learned eventually there were a few things that worked out better going slow) so I'd get the shields out and put on before I went to cultivate. 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 21, 2015, 08:12:09 AM
When we firstmoved here many. many years ago, I brought with me a 1949 Farmall A widefront dual fuel.  It  had an L59 Woods belly mower and while good for mowing the lawn, that was about it.

Old tractors are fun if you have the time and don't wamt to do real work.  Thats not me.

Our next door neighbor had 40 acres and farmed probably 27 or 28 acres of it with a Farmall A.  They had several boys so that tractor was going all the time but it would get the job done.  At that time there were still a few neighbors farming with horses or mules so they were still ahead of the curve I guess.

The offset design of the A was to make it easier to cultivate.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 21, 2015, 08:50:34 AM
The offset design of the A was to make it easier to cultivate.

Actually, the 'A' was called the Farmall A Cultivision.....

IH came out with a diesel version a couple years ago (offset PTO).  Don't think it was a big seller.

The offset PTO was a PITA.  Good for stationary application like a grain leg or hammer mill, but that was it and all the implements except the drawbar single bottom plow side mounted (the advent of the 3PH after the A came out), obsoleted the side mount implement.  Early Farmall's were dead PTO, that is, it was run through the main clutch.  Disengaging the clutch, disengaged the PTO too.  A PITA.

Today, the 3PH is being obsoleted by the european designed hook type attachment instead of the now used captured ball hookup.  The hook type is quicker and easier to hook up attachments to.....

I still have the drawbar plow from the 'A' in the barn, never in the ground.....

Mine was dual fuel, gasoline and 'distillate' (keroscene).  Started on gas, got it hot, closed the radiator shutters and switched to distillate.  If you ran it on distillate you had to make sure you were upwind of the exhaust stack or you got covered with oily film as it really didn't burn keroscene very well.

That was a WW2 thing for when gas was rationed.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 21, 2015, 09:09:43 AM
The offset design of the A was to make it easier to cultivate.

Actually, the 'A' was called the Farmall A Cultivision.....

IH came out with a diesel version a couple years ago (offset PTO).  Don't think it was a big seller.

The offset PTO was a PITA.  Good for stationary application like a grain leg or hammer mill, but that was it and all the implements except the drawbar single bottom plow side mounted (the advent of the 3PH after the A came out), obsoleted the side mount implement.  Early Farmall's were dead PTO, that is, it was run through the main clutch.  Disengaging the clutch, disengaged the PTO too.  A PITA.

Today, the 3PH is being obsoleted by the european designed hook type attachment instead of the now used captured ball hookup.  The hook type is quicker and easier to hook up attachments to.....

I still have the drawbar plow from the 'A' in the barn, never in the ground.....

Mine was dual fuel, gasoline and 'distillate' (keroscene).  Started on gas, got it hot, closed the radiator shutters and switched to distillate.  If you ran it on distillate you had to make sure you were upwind of the exhaust stack or you got covered with oily film as it really didn't burn keroscene very well.

That was a WW2 thing for when gas was rationed.

I don't remember their A having a pto.  They would come and get one of our Hs if they were running an elevator.  They had someone come in and bale their hay and then they'd pick it up in the field and put it in the barn.

That drawbar mount plow is probably approaching serious 'collector item' status. 

Try putting an ad on Epay with some ridiculous minimum and you might be very surprised ;) ;) ;)

The one my son has still has dual fuel which is one of the ways we know it's pre-1951.  The radiator shutters are long gone.  If you didn't crank them shut and back open on a regular basis they tended to freeze up.  The small tank is long gone too. 

The Hs my Dad had both still had working dual fuel setups (this would have been in the early 50s).  One major problem was if you stalled it the tractor under a heavy load and if it didn't catch the very first time you tried to restart it then you probably were not going to get it started without a hassle.  The carbs have a 'drain' valve on the side so you can close the distillate tank and open the gasoline tank and force all the distillate out of the lines and carb (drain it on the ground today and the EPA will be looking over your shoulder).

The Hs had a special exhaust manifold setup to help heat the distillate mixture to make it more combustible.  Those parts all tended to freeze up if not used regularly too.

My IH Cub Cadet Lowboy 154 had a 'thermo syphon' radiator setup...  no water circulating pump.  The water heats up and rises and when it cools down in the radiator it falls by itself without a pump.  Works great as long as you keep the radiator clean.  Seems like at least the older As used the same setup.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on July 21, 2015, 09:15:20 AM
I see you changed one but missed the other.


Well excuse the hell out of me.

I'll leave it the way it is, just to piss you off, mister grammar police.

They're.  Take that.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: arpydave on July 21, 2015, 09:31:21 AM
Quote from: livewire link=topic=30148.msg705125#ms


[quote author=livewire link=topic=30148.msg705125#msg705125 date=1437484520

They're.  Take that.

Choking up my morning coffee and smoke and LMFAO!!!

Touche', good one!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 02:01:17 PM

Well excuse the hell out of me.

I'll leave it the way it is, just to piss you off, mister grammar police.

They're.  Take that.

Hit him where it hurts Live!

 ;D
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 21, 2015, 08:43:47 PM

Well excuse the hell out of me.

I'll leave it the way it is, just to piss you off, mister grammar police.

They're.  Take that.
It's interesting to watch the right-wingers cheer you on from the cheap seats with words of encouragement...but what's really telling is that they think you're dumb enough to fall for it.

Well I must say they probably know you better than I do.  ;)

Choking up my morning coffee and smoke and LMFAO!!!

Touche', good one!

What fossils find funny is beyond me.

Hit him where it hurts Live!

 ;D
Really? Thanks for exemplifying how you've earned your nickname.  ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 09:57:07 PM
Really? Thanks for exemplifying how you've earned your nickname.  ;)

Oh for crying out loud!

Can you get through 5 minutes of your life without thinking about the male genitalia!

Don't project your self hate obsession on me Fry.

Are you on the State Watch list yet?  It sure sounds like you should be.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 21, 2015, 10:02:17 PM
Oh for crying out loud!

Can you get through 5 minutes of your life without thinking about the male genitalia!

Don't project your self hate obsession on me Fry.

Are you on the State Watch list yet?  It sure sounds like you should be.
LOL on what you thought your nickname was.

But I can see why you thought that.  ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 10:08:47 PM
LOL on what you thought your nickname was.

But I can see why you thought that.  ;)

I don't know what you think my nickname is - but I know what yours is Mr. Weed.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 21, 2015, 10:13:37 PM
I don't know what you think my nickname is - but I know what yours is Mr. Weed.
Well that's odd since I don't smoke.  8*

Like I said before...you're the "imbecile" of the forum.

But I guess that's not really a nickname since it's actually factual.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 10:15:41 PM
Well that's odd since I don't smoke.  8*

Like I said before...you're the "imbecile" of the forum.

But I guess that's not really a nickname since it's actually factual.

Gee Fry - isn't name calling against that list of rules you want the Admin to enforce?

Maybe someone should report you for bullying.....

 ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 21, 2015, 10:19:29 PM
I don't remember they're A having a pto.  They would come and get one of our Hs if they were running an elevator.  They had someone come in and bale their hay and then they'd pick it up in the field and put it in the barn.

That drawbar mount plow is probably approaching serious 'collector item' status. 

Try putting an ad on Epay with some ridiculous minimum and you might be very surprised ;) ;) ;)

The one my son has still has dual fuel which is one of the ways we know it's pre-1951.  The radiator shutters are long gone.  If you didn't crank them shut and back open on a regular basis they tended to freeze up.  The small tank is long gone too. 

The Hs my Dad had both still had working dual fuel setups (this would have been in the early 50s).  One major problem was if you stalled it the tractor under a heavy load and if it didn't catch the very first time you tried to restart it then you probably were not going to get it started without a hassle.  The carbs have a 'drain' valve on the side so you can close the distillate tank and open the gasoline tank and force all the distillate out of the lines and carb (drain it on the ground today and the EPA will be looking over your shoulder).

The Hs had a special exhaust manifold setup to help heat the distillate mixture to make it more combustible.  Those parts all tended to freeze up if not used regularly too.

My IH Cub Cadet Lowboy 154 had a 'thermo syphon' radiator setup...  no water circulating pump.  The water heats up and rises and when it cools down in the radiator it falls by itself without a pump.  Works great as long as you keep the radiator clean.  Seems like at least the older As used the same setup.

The PTO was an option on the A.  I had the original paperwork and manuals too.  I sold it and everything but the plow years ago.  You can come over anfd get the plow if you want it...  Would make a nice yard ornament.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 10:21:44 PM
The PTO was an option on the A.  I had the original paperwork and manuals too.  I sold it and everything but the plow years ago.  You can come over anfd get the plow if you want it...  Would make a nice yard ornament.

Probably be a nice chunk of change at the scrap yard too!

 ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on July 21, 2015, 10:22:30 PM
Scrap ain't worth shitte right now.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Monroe Native on July 21, 2015, 10:23:48 PM
Scrap ain't worth shitte right now.

I read someplace that Central American countries are paying big bucks for old US farming equipment.....

We just gotta get it to TX.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: arpydave on July 22, 2015, 01:43:30 AM

What fossils find funny is beyond me.


From what I've seen anything above Sesame Street or written in the National Enquirer is beyond you.

Here's a clue: ya ain't any smarter just cuz ya own a smart phone. And cutting and pasting articles from websites of dubious vetting and sourcing don't make ya king of the investigative journalists, either.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on July 22, 2015, 03:57:13 AM
From what I've seen anything above Sesame Street or written in the National Enquirer is beyond you.

Here's a clue: ya ain't any smarter just cuz ya own a smart phone. And cutting and pasting articles from websites of dubious vetting and sourcing don't make ya king of the investigative journalists, either.
Bizarre.

I suspect years of oxygen deprivation has taken its toll.

But then that's typical of right-wing squids...or maybe the correct term is bubblehead.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 22, 2015, 06:40:30 AM
The PTO was an option on the A.  I had the original paperwork and manuals too.  I sold it and everything but the plow years ago.  You can come over anfd get the plow if you want it...  Would make a nice yard ornament.

I'll take a look at it and maybe a couple of pictures.  That belongs on someone's parade perfect restoration project.  I think we might even have some members of one of the local collector clubs on here.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: arpydave on July 22, 2015, 09:14:02 AM
Heh,heh, heh there Froot Fly, I mean French Fry. Thanks for the morning chuckle. Not a full out laff like I had yesterday from LW's post. His response added a third way of looking at it. And it didn't have to be directed towards anybody in particular.

It was, in short, clever. Something I would NEVER dare accuse you of. He used wit. In some circles it may have been called "rapier wit". Rapier, as in the fencing sword. Hence my reply of "touche'."

There Froot Fly, you've gotten your Introductory English Lit lesson for today. You can return to hanging out with the rest of the trolls under the bridge waiting for the 3 Billy Goats Gruff to walk on by so you can try to needle them into a verbal sparring match.

I added that reference to an elementary school tale(tail, whatever, haha) so it wasn't "beyond you".


Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on July 23, 2015, 08:34:10 PM
I read someplace that Central American countries are paying big bucks for old US farming equipment.....

We just gotta get it to TX.
Probably harder to get across the border going the other way  ;)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on July 23, 2015, 08:46:17 PM
Farmed with some old designed for horses - grain drill...  lost the book (someone scrapped the old refidge that had old farm manuals in it without telling me)

The book had the schematics for a wire driven planting system that criss crossed and filled in the field.   

Still have a hand start ( fly wheel) 2 cylinder Deere Model g  ... 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 24, 2015, 08:36:10 AM
Farmed with some old designed for horses - grain drill...  lost the book (someone scrapped the old refidge that had old farm manuals in it without telling me)

The book had the schematics for a wire driven planting system that criss crossed and filled in the field.   

Still have a hand start ( fly wheel) 2 cylinder Deere Model g  ...


I can't help you with the manual (I'll keep my eyes open though) but I did post a YouTube last November showing a corn planter using the 'check' planting cable system. 

http://monroetalks.com/forum/index.php?topic=30148.msg678202#msg678202 (http://monroetalks.com/forum/index.php?topic=30148.msg678202#msg678202)


www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WTP_qYzvKZs (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WTP_qYzvKZs#)

Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on July 24, 2015, 08:53:20 AM
Here's some more background on 'check' planting.

Interesting that the old 40-42" row spacing had to do with how wide the hips of the horses were!!!

Quote
When farmers used horses for cultivating, they had to plant rows as wide as their horses' hips – 40- to 42-inches. In fact the most common practice was to plant "cross-checked rows" with hills of corn planted equally both north and south and east and west. A wire was stretched across the field with knots every 40 or 42 inches. When the planter hit that knot, it would drop three or four seeds into the hill. Then, later in the season, the farmer could cultivate with horses in both directions.
As farmers bought row crop tractors with wheels that could be adjusted to fit narrower rows, agricultural researchers discovered that single corn plants more closely spaced in rows yielded more corn per acre. In addition, the mechanical corn pickers that were being introduced did better in rows. So, farmers began resetting their planters to drill rows of corn rather than dropping hills of corn.


More at:  http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/machines_03.html (http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/machines_03.html)

That's a great website for all kinds of historic farm info.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 21, 2016, 06:14:16 PM
This isn't really a question on the equipment but rather an idea on what were they putting down?

Saw a Terragator working in a field today.  It was one with a hopper and booms on it rather than a broadcast spreader.  Whatever it was looked dry and there was a white 'dust' blowing back up from the ground.  Couldn't really hear the engine on the machine running but could definitely hear the blower or turbine.

My first thought is they were putting down lime but usually you see piles of it dumped around the field and I didn't notice any piles anywhere.  It did look like they were near the end of the job so maybe they had used up the piles.

Just seems a little early to be doing anything like that yet :-\ :-\ :-\
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on January 22, 2016, 08:00:25 AM
This isn't really a question on the equipment but rather an idea on what were they putting down?

Saw a Terragator working in a field today.  It was one with a hopper and booms on it rather than a broadcast spreader.  Whatever it was looked dry and there was a white 'dust' blowing back up from the ground.  Couldn't really hear the engine on the machine running but could definitely hear the blower or turbine.

My first thought is they were putting down lime but usually you see piles of it dumped around the field and I didn't notice any piles anywhere.  It did look like they were near the end of the job so maybe they had used up the piles.

Just seems a little early to be doing anything like that yet :-\ :-\ :-\
I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 22, 2016, 08:18:42 AM
I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.

This was down closer to here but probably the same machine.  I've seen them do potash too.  I just didn't see where they'd been dumping anything on the ground and I didn't see any kind of a 'tender' truck in the field either.  Lots of treerows in the field though and the machine was clear to the back (half a mile) so it would have been easy to miss anything but the Terragator!!!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: livewire on January 22, 2016, 09:12:45 AM
Potash is often spread in winter, but I've never seen it dumped on the ground, and loaded with loaders into a spreader.  It's typically loaded with a tender truck.  Anything dumped on the ground is most likely ag lime, as Prof mentioned. 

But it might be potash.  Who knows?  Lol

Lime is usually whitish-grey in color, not brown.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 22, 2016, 09:22:04 AM
Potash is often spread in winter, but I've never seen it dumped on the ground, and loaded with loaders into a spreader.  It's typically loaded with a tender truck.  Anything dumped on the ground is most likely ag lime, as Prof mentioned. 

But it might be potash.  Who knows?  Lol

Lime is usually whitish-grey in color, not brown.

Sounds like it's one or the other then.  It just seemed a little early to see them spreading anything yet. 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on January 24, 2016, 01:53:14 AM
Sewage Sludge as Fertilizer: Safe?

Sewage sludge regularly tests positive for a host of heavy metals, flame retardants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals, phthalates, dioxins, and a host of other chemicals and organisms.  Of the thousands of contaminants that have been found in sludge, the U.S. government regulates exactly 10 of them (nine heavy metals and fecal coliform) if you want to spread the sludge on farm fields growing food crops.

When industry, hospitals, and households send their waste to wastewater treatment plants, the plants remove as many contaminants as possible from the water and then discharge the water as effluent.  The leftover solids are sludge.

Sewage sludge is typically treated to remove some–but not all–of the contaminants.  In recent decades, the sludge lobby (yes, there is one) has rebranded the treated sludge as “biosolids.”

Sludge that is applied to farmland–or even golf courses, home gardens, and, in the past, the White House lawn–comes in two flavors: Class A Biosolids and Class B Biosolids.  The only regulatory difference between the two is the level of fecal coliform, which is lower in Class A.

Class B Biosolids may be applied only to land where crops fed to animals are grown.  No restrictions apply to Class A Biosolids.   You as a home gardener can even buy these at your local gardening store and grow your own food in them.  Various cities get very creative at “branding” their sludge, so that gardeners can choose between “Milorganite” from Milwaukee, “Hou-Actinite” from Houston, or “GroCo” from Seattle.

Often, but not always, the various contaminants are found in sewage sludge at low levels. What happens to them once the sludge is applied to the soil is anyone’s guess.  Some chemicals bind to the soil; others do not.  Some chemicals leach into groundwater; others are insoluble in water.

Some chemicals are taken up by plants–perhaps into the roots only, or into leaves, or all the way into fruits.  Some chemicals break down into harmless components, others break down into dangerous components, and others don’t break down at all.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/10/sewage-sludge-as-fertilizer-safe/#.VqR0ACorKUl (http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/10/sewage-sludge-as-fertilizer-safe/#.VqR0ACorKUl)

===

Huge Amounts Human Waste Being Sprayed On Farm Land
http://www.rense.com/general3/prs.htm (http://www.rense.com/general3/prs.htm)

===

Human waste as fertilizer defended
http://blog.mlive.com/citpat/2008/08/human_waste_as_fertilizer_defe.html (http://blog.mlive.com/citpat/2008/08/human_waste_as_fertilizer_defe.html)

===

Toilet to table: Human waste serves as cheap, effective fertilizer

(http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site569/2013/0113/20130113__130114-Fertilizer_400.jpg)
http://www.twincities.com/ci_22367291/from-your-toilet-your-dining-table (http://www.twincities.com/ci_22367291/from-your-toilet-your-dining-table)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on January 24, 2016, 12:23:38 PM
Another stupid azzed post by the resident azzhole.  You don't know shitte from shinola bud.  Only what you read on the net and can copy and paste....  and I broke my cardinal rule and opened your post to find it was your usual blather.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Maverick on January 24, 2016, 10:29:02 PM
When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Frenchfry on January 25, 2016, 06:10:57 AM
I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.
When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav

Another stupid azzed post by the resident azzhole.  You don't know shitte from shinola bud.  Only what you read on the net and can copy and paste....  and I broke my cardinal rule and opened your post to find it was your usual blather.
Hmmm...brown...which is the color of the stuff I posted...and similar to the stuff Mav mentioned...

Sort of makes SidecarFlip the azzhole.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on January 25, 2016, 10:00:52 AM
When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav

I remember growing up in Cleveland and all the ethnic ladies on the lower west side fertilized their gardens the same way and sold the produce at the West Side Market on West 25th Street.  Never was an issue.  Recycling was alive and well back then too.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on January 26, 2016, 09:29:25 PM
Nice plow

https://www.facebook.com/AgricultureTechnologies/videos/1298631503495880/ (https://www.facebook.com/AgricultureTechnologies/videos/1298631503495880/)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 27, 2016, 08:22:29 AM
Nice plow

https://www.facebook.com/AgricultureTechnologies/videos/1298631503495880/ (https://www.facebook.com/AgricultureTechnologies/videos/1298631503495880/)

Appears to be in Europe somewhere. 

I can't imagine plowing along and hitting one of our big rocks with that plow out front. 

My Dad always used a trailer plow on his Farmall Hs.  Breakaway hitch worked good.  I tripped it a couple of times and you just had to be quick enough to get the tractor stopped before you got to the end of the trip rope that was usually hooked to the back of the seat of the tractor ;D ;D ;D

Then he bought an AC WD 45 with a mounted 3 bottom but no trip device for rocks!!! 
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Tiny on January 27, 2016, 11:08:06 AM
My dad was plowing once with my brother standing beside him when he hit a huge rock. The tractor stopped dead and my brother fell in front of the big rear tire. Lucky the tractor stalled or he would have been run over. No more riding on the tractor beside dad after that.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: blue2 on January 27, 2016, 11:15:52 AM
Sometimes you get lucky...
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on January 28, 2016, 07:09:04 AM
My dad was plowing once with my brother standing beside him when he hit a huge rock. The tractor stopped dead and my brother fell in front of the big rear tire. Lucky the tractor stalled or he would have been run over. No more riding on the tractor beside dad after that.

I rode a lot of hours beside my Dad.  He was pretty safety oriented and was especially careful with things like that because he fell off a tractor he was riding on as a child and got run over by a cultipacker.  Also my Dad's 'day' job was as a crane operator (back before hydraulics when they were all cables, drums, brakes and clutches) so his reflexes were honed pretty sharp!

Sometimes you get lucky...

Correct!!!

I've never liked the wide use of the phrase 'accident'...

there are very, very few true 'accidents'...

Most everything that gets called an 'accident' is (in my opinion) the result of someones negligence or not very well planned out intentions. 

Motor vehicle accidents today are so often the result of operator inattention or distractions.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on February 15, 2016, 08:16:24 AM
On the way home yesterday we jumped off the freeway at Newport to go by Al's farm equipment...

I'd heard they had a used IH Cub Cadet LoBoy 154 similar to mine.  They had it parked right out front and it definitely is in pretty good shape.  It has the skinny tri-rib front tires but then the rear tires are turf tires which doesn't make any sense to me.  I have turf tires at all 4 corners.

I also see they're an LS Tractors dealer.  Compact and Lawn & Garden variety tractors...

My first thought is they look a lot like a New Holland and when I got home and started reading on their website it looks like some of their products are built by New Holland. 

http://lstractorusa.com/ (http://lstractorusa.com/)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: Professor H on February 15, 2016, 10:59:52 AM
BRD your are correct there are no "accidents" they are all avoidable...

We called them car crashes, but the culture and use of the term accident is hard to overcome
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on February 16, 2016, 07:33:03 AM
BRD your are correct there are no "accidents" they are all avoidable...

We called them car crashes, but the culture and use of the term accident is hard to overcome
[/b]

I blame the press and journalists for that one...

I remember a few years back when the guy crashed his car down on the turnpike going over 150 mph...

one of the Toledo TV reporters was describing the series of events that led up to the "accident"....

That is as far from an accident as you can get.  Seems like he was eventually charged with some pretty serious charges. 

But, it was no way an ACCIDENT!!!
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 16, 2016, 09:22:06 AM
On the way home yesterday we jumped off the freeway at Newport to go by Al's farm equipment...

I'd heard they had a used IH Cub Cadet LoBoy 154 similar to mine.  They had it parked right out front and it definitely is in pretty good shape.  It has the skinny tri-rib front tires but then the rear tires are turf tires which doesn't make any sense to me.  I have turf tires at all 4 corners.

I also see they're an LS Tractors dealer.  Compact and Lawn & Garden variety tractors...

My first thought is they look a lot like a New Holland and when I got home and started reading on their website it looks like some of their products are built by New Holland. 

[url]http://lstractorusa.com/[/url] ([url]http://lstractorusa.com/[/url])


I think it's the other way around.  LS copied the NH utility, open station tractor, much like Kioti started out by buying obsolete tooling and building a Kubota clone (which they got sued for, for trade dress infringement) btw.  Kubota is bery protective of their trafemark orange paint, Kioti painted their clone orange too...  Why not capitalize on a good thing.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on February 16, 2016, 10:18:02 AM
I think it's the other way around.  LS copied the NH utility, open station tractor, much like Kioti started out by buying obsolete tooling and building a Kubota clone (which they got sued for, for trade dress infringement) btw.  Kubota is bery protective of their trafemark orange paint, Kioti painted their clone orange too...  Why not capitalize on a good thing.


Found this that somewhat explains the 'duplicates'!

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/ls-tractor-buying-pricing/244089-ls-tractor-new-holland-model.html (http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/ls-tractor-buying-pricing/244089-ls-tractor-new-holland-model.html)
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: SidecarFlip on February 17, 2016, 05:12:59 AM
...been a mamber of that forum for at least 15 years.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on August 10, 2016, 01:47:28 PM
I was down just south of the state line and west of Toledo this morning in 'farm country'!

They're corn and beans all look good and not as stressed as here.  Lots of hay down or just baled...

mostly round bales wrapped in plastic. 

I saw a tractor just sitting in a hay field and the hay had been cut and was in windrows.  If the tractor had been working or parked with the front end toward me I probably could have seen what was mounted on the front end.

It wasn't towing anything and there was something that looked like it was mounted on a front end loader frame without a bucket...  I'm thinking it was some kind of a side rake or tedder rake but not for sure.  I haven't seen anything like it before.

Anyone have an idea of what I'm talking about.

It looked like a pretty up to date New Holland 4 wheel drive...

not really a compact tractor but not a big farm tractor either...

If there had even been anyone around I would have waited to see what it was doing.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on August 12, 2016, 10:41:42 AM
This must be what I saw down by Delta, OH on Wednesday.

https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=13510 (https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=13510)

The tractor I saw did not have a baler on the back though.
Title: Re: A farm equipment question?
Post by: BigRedDog on September 06, 2016, 09:02:21 AM
We were over in Ida over the weekend and saw a couple of hay balers going down the road.  One was not too far behind the other so probably owned by the same farmer.  Mounted on the top of the baler (both were conventional balers) was what looked like a small salt spreader that you see mounted on the tailgate of a pickup in the wintertime.  Maybe a 2 bushel hopper (they were both going down the road at a pretty good clip). 

I can only guess that they are spreading some kind of preservative or adding some kind of nutrient...

maybe sidecarflip will know the answer to this one :D :D :D