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Monroe Native

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #180 on: September 08, 2014, 02:03:06 PM »

I'm the ignorant one?

Really?

Give me a break.....
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Frenchfry

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #181 on: September 16, 2014, 01:57:56 AM »

It's true, I'm not well versed on the issue since I find the whole hate thing being wagered by the right to be quite nonsensical.
I recently saw this:


13 Years After 9/11, Anti-Muslim Bigotry Is Worse Than Ever

Americans view Muslims far worse today than right after 9/11. Some of this is Muslims’ own fault. But the hate-mongering sure isn’t.

On 9/11, I didn’t watch the World Trade Center collapse on television like most people. I witnessed that tragedy a few blocks from where it occurred, standing motionless at 8th Street and 6th Avenue in lower Manhattan.

Images from that day are still seared in my mind. The South Tower buckling. A sobbing woman running by. An NYPD police car racing uptown covered in debris. A crystal blue sky.

Once we learned that al Qaeda was responsible for the attack, I knew there would be a backlash against Muslim and Middle Eastern Americans.  But what I could’ve never predicted was that, 13 years later, my fellow Americans would view Muslims far worse today than in the months after 9/11.

The numbers tell a distressing tale. In October 2001, an ABC poll found that 47 percent of Americans had a favorable view of Islam. By 2010, that number had dropped to 37 percent.

And today, alarmingly, only 27 percent of Americans have a favorable view of Muslim Americans. This last poll is the most concerning because it shows how my fellow Americans see my Muslim friends, colleagues and even me—because I’m Muslim.

How did we get to this place? That’s a question I’ve been asking myself over and over.

There are a few key factors. Undisputedly the horrible acts committed by radical Muslims have had a big impact.  In the last year alone we’ve seen the Boston Marathon bombing, the Boko Haram kidnappings of schoolgirls, and now ISIS rampaging through Iraq and Syria.

Another reason is that many Americans tell me they don’t see Muslims publicly condemning these terrorists. They want to be convinced that the radicals are truly the exception and not “true Islam.”

Of course, condemning terrorism and getting media coverage for it are two different things. A grisly beheading results in days of media coverage. Muslim leaders holding a press conference denouncing terrorism, which they have done extensively in response to ISIS, will result in two to three minutes of media coverage on cable news, if they’re lucky.

Making our efforts more challenging is that we are a small minority group, comprising only 1 to 2 percent of the nation. Unsurprisingly, a recent Pew poll found that more than 60 percent of Americans don’t even personally know a Muslim.

If you only see news stories that present Muslims in a negative light, and you have no personal connection to Muslims to offer a counter narrative, I can understand why many hold negative views of us.

Compounding this issue is that there are few positive images of Muslims or Muslim Americans in American entertainment media. In fact, the exact opposite is true as Hollywood has made millions furthering the worst image of Muslims. And I can tell you firsthand as someone who has pitched film and TV shows that would depict Muslims in a positive light, there’s little appetite in Hollywood for such projects.

But there’s something else causing this. And it’s something truly despicable. There are people who intentionally stoke the flames of hate against our community.

Some do it because they simply detest/fear anyone who doesn’t pray or look like them. For some, Muslim bashing is their career. They make a living writing books and giving lectures about how Muslims want to destroy America.

And then there are the politicians, almost exclusively Republicans, who gin up hate of the “other” for political gain. The anti-sharia law measures passed in states like Florida and North Carolina are a prime example.

The proponents of these laws will demonize Muslims while making the case for these measures. Yet they publicly admit there are zero instances of Muslims trying to impose Islamic law in their respective states. For example, Florida State Senator Alan Hays conceded as much but argued the anti-Shaira law legislation was needed as a “preemptive measure,” similar to when  your parents would “have you vaccinated against different diseases.”
And worse, we have seen unmitigated hate spewed by some Republicans that could inspire hate crimes. For example, just last week Oklahoma State Representative John Bennett wrote on his official Facebook page that Christians should be “wary” of Muslim Americans because they are planning to kill Christians.  Not only did Bennett refuse to apologize for his comments, the Oklahoma state Republican chair defended Bennett.

What a difference from the words President George W. Bush offered our nation in the days after 9/11. Bush, with the World Trade Center still literally smoldering, visited the large Islamic Center in Washington, D.C., and denounced those who were demonizing Muslim Americans: “Those who feel like they can intimidate our fellow citizens to take out their anger don’t represent the best of America, they represent the worst of humankind, and they should be ashamed of that kind of behavior.”

Bush added:  “America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens, and Muslims make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country. Muslims are doctors, lawyers, law professors, members of the military, entrepreneurs, shopkeepers, moms and dads. And they need to be treated with respect.”

So what’s the future for Muslim Americans? Will we see even more hate crimes against Muslims? And Sikhs, whom many misidentify as Muslims? These numbers have spiked in recent years. And just last week my friend Linda Sarsour, a hijab-wearing civil rights activist, was attacked on the streets of New York City by a man who shouted that he wanted to behead her and then chased her into traffic. Thankfully, Linda was not injured and the assailant, a white male, was arrested.

Will we see an even higher number of employment discrimination claims filed by Muslim Americans? Currently over 20 percent of the claims filed with the EEOC are from Muslims, even though we comprise just 2 percent of the country.

I want to be optimistic. I want to be able to say in a few years it will be better. But I don’t know if that’s true.

What I can say with confidence is that American Muslims are not going anywhere. Yes, we will denounce those who commit horrible acts in the name of our faith to make it clear their actions don’t represent us. However, our focus is pursuing our American dream just like every other American. We will become doctors, deli owners, teachers, parents, and maybe even one day, President of the United States.

And what I can also say to the bigots is that we will continue, together with the good people who stand with us, to fight your efforts to demonize and marginalize us simply because of our faith. We won’t do that because it’s demanded of us as Muslims, we will do that because it’s demanded of us as Americans.
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/09/11/13-years-after-9-11-anti-muslim-bigotry-is-worse-than-ever.html
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"Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative."
John Stuart Mill

Willful ignorance, PaTROLLing, bullying, dishonesty, and hypocrisy are among the traits that are common amongst those that espouse the Republican/Conservative/Tea Party ideology.

A non-response doesn't mean you've won, it merely means the obnoxious, illiterate, right-wing morons have taken too much of my time already.

Frenchfry

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #182 on: September 16, 2014, 02:08:28 AM »

Islam is not a new religion, but the same truth that God revealed through all His prophets to every people. For a fifth of the world's population, Islam is both a religion and a complete way of life. Muslims follow a religion of peace, mercy, and forgiveness, and the majority have nothing to do with the extremely grave events which have come to be associated with their faith.
http://www.islamicity.com/education/understandingislamandmuslims/?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

===

Portraits of Ordinary Muslims
A glimpse of how diverse Muslims from around the world find their faith intertwining with their lives, identities and politics.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/muslims/portraits/

===

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim

===

http://www.gotquestions.org/Islam.html

===

Muslims (nationality)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslims_(nationality)
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"Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative."
John Stuart Mill

Willful ignorance, PaTROLLing, bullying, dishonesty, and hypocrisy are among the traits that are common amongst those that espouse the Republican/Conservative/Tea Party ideology.

A non-response doesn't mean you've won, it merely means the obnoxious, illiterate, right-wing morons have taken too much of my time already.

Frenchfry

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #183 on: September 16, 2014, 02:16:34 AM »

You don't have to agree with this person but please stop the senseless hate.

IDENTITY VS. NATIONALITY VS. ETHNICITY

Being half Pakistani, half white, raised in America and living in the UAE, I'd long ago learned that when people ask me where I'm from, they don't want to hear 'Chicago.' They want to know why I look like an Arab, sound like an American and hang out with a brown guy who bears striking resemblance to my Turkish-looking children. So I have no problem presenting my pedigree at the drop of the hat, because I know that there is no short and accurate answer. I'm Muslim, I was raised in America, but have also lived in Pakistan for eight years, my mother is American, my father is Pakistani. My father is Muslim, my mother is Mormon. No, they are not divorced.

“Ah, yes yes,” people nod, as things start to make sense. Then the next question comes:“And your husband, he is local?” When people here say local, they mean local Emirati, and they ask because any foreign Muslim woman wearing a black abaya must to be married to her local counterpart in the white kandoora, right? (salt and pepper, yin and yang?) “Actually,” I say, “My husband is Pakistani.”

“Bakistani?”

“Yes…” I try to explain, because the brown guy in the Blogger t-shirt with the standard Midwestern accent who says things like, “Hey, howyadoin?” does not fit inside of the box traditionally reserved for Bakistani. “Well, his parents are from Pakistan, but he was born in Kuwait. And raised in Oman. And went to school in the UAE, and college in the US. And, he's never lived in Pakistan, but I'm sure he's visited a few times.” People nod uncertainly. “So I mean, he's Pakistani, but he's not really very Pakistani? I mean, I'm more Urdu-literate than he is! But he looks brown, so his Urdu comes off better than mine, and his accent is better too.” And then people start to get that polite look of panic in their eyes that is usually accompanied by a sudden urge to rush home and see if they left the iron plugged in.

I think it's easier for me to explain myself than it is for him, because I at least was born in, and brought up in, the country of my nationality. He was born in country A, raised in countries B and C, educated in country D, and has a passport from (but has never lived in) country D. And in this country, your salary and your renumeration package is directly connected to your nationality. [Yes, it's racist, idiotic, and unfair. No, I can't do anything about it. The Mighty Whities (US, UK, Australian, and South African Nationals) get top dollars, top benefits, and more prominent positions. The rest of us are on a much, much lower pay scale, with much fewer benefits. Why? Because if you, Brown Guy #237, don't like it, there are 67,409 other Brown Guys standing in line behind you who are willing to work for what it a humungous salary back home, though a paltry one according to the expenses of Dubai. If White Guy #1 doesn't like his job, how will we ever replace him? Do you have any idea how hard it is to coax a white guy out here? Quick, meet his demands! His accent makes our company sound posh!]

The office, who is legally obliged to give employees tickets “home” once a year, wants to give my husband tickets to a home he's never lived in, because his passport is Pakistani. So, to get tickets back to the “home” he actually has family in, he says he's American. That also explains the way he talks, but not the way he looks. But then he has to deal with people on both sides of the fence who say things like: “American? You're not an American, you're a Pakistani national!” And if he says he's Pakistani, people say things like, “Oh, where from?” and he says “I don't know, I've never lived there….” So where did you live before this? “Umm, America.” In some ways this is very typical of what I call “The International Muslim.” Yesterday we went to the barbeque of another “Pakistani” family, born in Saudi, raised in Connecticut, moved to Dubai last year. We had steak and barbecue chicken, we played Scrabble and we've invited them over some time after next week. We'll make sushi. Chai, a dear friend of mine, once told me a story about her young brother, Ismo. Ismo, then seven or eight, brought a friend over from school to play. Chai overheard the following conversation:

“Hey, what are you? Are you Muslim?”

“Muslim? I don't know.”

“Well, do you eat rice?”

“Yes.”

“Then you're Muslim.”

I often remember that story when people ask me what “I am.” This is a different question from 'where are you from' or 'what is your nationality.' This is not a question of ethnicity or nationality, this is a question of identity. They want to know what my culture is. Do I make Nihari? Yes. Does that make me a Pakistani? I don't know, do Pakistanis traditionally bake gingerbread men for Ramadan? Does my husband eat Pakistani food? Yes, does that make him Pakistani? Not any more than eating sushi makes him Japanese, and we roll our sushi at home. I don't think that the food you eat determines 'what you are,' nor does the way you behave neatly define what your culture is. Do I respect my elders? Yes. Is that an exclusively Asian thing? Nope. Was I an obnoxious teenager? Oh yes. Is that an exclusively 'American' thing? Unfortunately, no.

I long ago realized I was too brown for the whites and too white for the browns. My first language is English but I have a funny foreign name. My Urdu is awful but my father is Pakistani, and my freckles are part of my Irish heritage. My passport is American but my wardrobe alone scares the bjeezus out of most Americans. My accent may be as American as apple pie, but my abaya most certainly isn't. So what am I? What is the determining factor for one's identity, if it is not nationality or ethnicity? Vague ideas of what is 'culture' differ on a regional or ethnic level, and are the passing whims of popularity and generally accepted social norms. You can argue that certain things make you American, but a hundred years ago, those same behaviours would be shocking, outrageous, and very un-American. (June is Gay Pride month in the US) They're not standards, they're just a sign of the times.

Even if I were to choose to be American, and to abide by the generally accepted principals of what being 'American' means, there are no principles of American-ness. Having a passport alone doesn't make me an 'American,' it only makes me an American national. I could choose to be Pakistani, but again, there's no documented process. My father is Pakistani, and he identifies with the culture and was born within the borders of the country, but guess what- he's an American national too. Being born in a certain country doesn't mean they'll teach you the secret handshake either- husband was born in Kuwait, and he is most definitely not a Kuwaiti, even when he does wear a kandoora. Ethnicity alone doesn't convey identity either, because I'm not an Irishwoman any more than my mother is. Without an agreed-upon standard determining the requirements of identity, the only thing left to fall back on is choice.

I did not choose to be born in America, any more than I chose to have a Pakistani father and an American mother. My ethnicity was set before I was even born, and my nationality can be changed if I decide to say… apply for Canadian immigration. My identity is the only thing I exert any control over. I choose to be Muslim, I identify with Muslims of all colors and countries, because we have an agreed upon standard of Muslim-ness. If you believe in Allah, and His Messenger, and the Qur'an, and you try to follow it- you're Muslim. These elements of belief are all matters of choice as well, and someone can easily choose to NOT be Muslim if they wanted to, and that choice alone would be sufficient for them to no longer be considered part of the Ummah anymore.

The food I cook is not determined by what my ancestors cooked, but by what is halal. The clothes I wear are not any specific national dress, they are pieces of cloth arranged in such a way that they fulfill the Islamic requirements for modesty; abaya, shalwar qameez, or skirt or whatever. I don't dance at Mehndhi parties just because 'I'm Pakistani' or go to prom just because 'I'm American.' I do, however, pray salah, fast, give zakah and wear a hijab because 'I'm Muslim.' My traditions and rituals are not specific to any tribe or cultural legacy, they are a follow-through on the Qur'an and the consensus of the scholars on the Sunnah, and I would be an arrogant idiot to say everything I did was 100% Islamic, but I can honestly say that the only defining culture I have is what has been given to me of Islam.

So what am I? Culturally, and consciously, I'm a Muslim. alhamdulillah. My nationality is American, and my ethnicity is Irish-Pakistani. I'm married to a lovely man whose ethnicity and nationality are Pakistani, but whose upbringing is as crisscrossed as international flight patterns. He's a Muslim too. My children are also Muslim, and insha'Allah, may they live in the state of Islam and not die except in a state of submission. They are American nationals born in the UAE who are ethnically 25% Irish, though they have never been to Ireland, and 75% Pakistani, though they have never been to Pakistan. Allah is the Lord of the East and the West, and the whole earth is a place of worship. Who knows where my children will live when they grow up, or how many strangers they'll scare away when asked what they are?
http://muslimmatters.org/2010/05/19/identity-vs-nationality-vs-ethnicity-2/
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"Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative."
John Stuart Mill

Willful ignorance, PaTROLLing, bullying, dishonesty, and hypocrisy are among the traits that are common amongst those that espouse the Republican/Conservative/Tea Party ideology.

A non-response doesn't mean you've won, it merely means the obnoxious, illiterate, right-wing morons have taken too much of my time already.

Frenchfry

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #184 on: September 16, 2014, 02:20:20 AM »

Appears I wasn't the only one confused:

Is muslim a nationality?

David S:
No. It's a religion. Like Christianity, Buddhism, Hindu, and Judaism.

?:
It's a religion, not a nationality. One is Muslim if their religion is Islam.

La lis blance de Arizona:
No. A nationality refers to coming from a country, french, english, spanish. Muslim is a religious affiliation like jewish, christian, or wiccan. Arab refers to a group of ethnicity's like asians or europeans.

shirleykins:
No. It's one of the fastest growing religions in the world.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080521185953AAZuVrI
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"Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative."
John Stuart Mill

Willful ignorance, PaTROLLing, bullying, dishonesty, and hypocrisy are among the traits that are common amongst those that espouse the Republican/Conservative/Tea Party ideology.

A non-response doesn't mean you've won, it merely means the obnoxious, illiterate, right-wing morons have taken too much of my time already.

Frenchfry

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #185 on: September 16, 2014, 02:24:05 AM »



1) "Islam" means "surrender" or "submission". "Salam" (which means "peace") is the root word of "Islam". In a religious context the word "Islam" means "the surrendering of one's will (without compulsion) to the true will of God in an effort to achieve peace".

2) "Muslim" means "anyone or anything that surrenders itself to the true will of God". By this definition, everything in nature (trees, animals, planets, etc.) are "muslims" because they are in a state of surrender to God's will. In other words, they are fulfilling the purpose for which God created them.

3) Islam is not a new religion or cult. Along with Judaism and Christianity it traces its roots through Prophet Abraham and back to the first humans Adam and Eve. Studies show that between 1.5 and 1.8 billion people in the world today identify their religion as Islam.

4) There are five pillars of practice in Islam. These practices must be undertaken with the best of effort in order to be considered a true Muslim: A) Declaration of faith in One God and that Muhammad is a prophet of God. B) Formal prayer five times a day. C) Poor-due "tax" - 2.5% of one's excess wealth given to the needy once a year. D) Pilgrimage to Mecca at least once, if physically and financially able. E) Fasting during the daylight hours in the month of Ramadan.

5) There are six articles of faith in Islam. These are the basic beliefs that one must have in order to be considered a true Muslim. They are belief in: A) the One God. B) all of the true prophets of God. C) the original scriptures revealed to Moses, David, Jesus and Muhammad. D) the angels. E) the Day of Judgment and the Hereafter. F) destiny.

6) Islam is a complete way of life that governs all facets of life: moral, spiritual, physical, intellectual, social, economical, etc.

7) Islam is one of the fastest growing religions in the world. To become Muslim, a person of any race or culture must say a simple statement, the shahadah, that bears witness to the belief in the One God and that Muhammad is a prophet of God.

8.) "Allah" is an Arabic word that means "God". Muslims also believe that "Allah" is the personal name of God.

9) Allah is not the God of Muslims only. He is the God of all people and all creation. Just because people refer to God using different terms does not mean there are different gods. Many Hispanics refer to God as "Dios" and many French refer to God as "Dieu" yet they mean the same God. Many Arab Jews and Arab Christians call God "Allah" and the word "Allah" (in Arabic script) appears on the walls of many Arab churches and on the pages of Arabic Bibles. Although the understanding of God may differ between the various faith groups, it does not change the fact that the One Lord and Creator of the Universe is the God of all people.

10) The Islamic concept of God is that He is loving, merciful and compassionate. Islam also teaches that He is just and swift in punishment. However, Allah once said to Muhammad, "My mercy prevails over my wrath". So Islam teaches a balance between fear and hope, protecting one from both complacency and despair.

11) Muslims believe that God has revealed 99 of His names, or attributes, in the Qur'an. It is through these names that one can come to know the Creator. A few of these names are the All-Merciful, the All-Knower, the Protector, the Provider, the Near, the First, the Last, the Hidden and the Source of All Peace.

12) The Christian concept of "vicarious atonement" (the idea that Jesus died for the sins of humanity) is alien to the Islamic concept of personal responsibility. Islam teaches that on the Day of Judgment every person will be resurrected and will be accountable to God for their every word and deed. Consequently, a practicing Muslim is always striving to be righteous while hoping and praying for God's acceptance and grace.

13) Muslims believe in all of the true prophets that preceded Muhammad, from Adam to Jesus. Muslims believe they brought the same message of voluntarily surrendering to God's will (islam, in a generic sense) to different peoples at different times. Muslims also believe they were "muslims" (again, in a generic sense) since they followed God's true guidance and surrendered their will to Him.

14) Muslims neither worship Muhammad nor pray through him. Muslims solely worship the Unseen and Omniscient Creator, Allah.

15) Muslims accept the original unaltered Torah (as revealed to Moses) and the original unaltered Bible (as revealed to Jesus) since they were revealed by God. But none of these scriptures exist today in their original form or in their entirety. Therefore, Muslims follow the subsequent, final and preserved revelation of God, the Qur'an.

16) The Qur'an was not authored by Muhammad. It was authored by God, revealed to Muhammad (through angel Gabriel) and written into physical form by his companions.

17) The original Arabic text of the Qur'an contains no flaws or contradictions, and has not been altered since its revelation.

18) Actual 7th century Qur'ans, complete and intact, are on display in museums in Turkey and other places around the world.

19) If all Qur'ans in the world today were destroyed, the original Arabic would still remain. This is because millions of Muslims, called "hafiz" (or "guardians") have memorized the text letter for letter from beginning to end, every word and every syllable. Also, chapters from the Qur'an are precisely recited from memory in each of the five formal prayers performed daily by hundreds of millions of Muslims throughout the world.

20) Some attribute the early and rapid spread of Islam to forced conversions by the sword. While it is accurate that the Muslim empire initially spread, for the most part, through battles and conquests (a common phenomenon for that time) the religion of Islam itself was never forced on anyone who found themselves living under Muslim rule. In fact, non-Muslims were afforded the right to worship as they pleased as long as a tax, called "jizyah", was paid. During the Dark Ages, Jews, Christians and others were given protection by the Muslims from religious persecutions happening in Europe. Islam teaches no compulsion in religion (Qur'an 2:256 and 10:99). For more, read "The Spread of Islam in the World" by Thomas Arnold.

21) Terrorism, unjustified violence and the killing of non-combatant civilians (or even intimidating, threatening or injuring them) are all absolutely forbidden in Islam. Islam is a way of life that is meant to bring peace to a society whether its people are Muslim or not. The extreme actions of those who claim to be Muslim may be a result of their ignorance, frustration, uncontrolled anger or political (not religious) ambitions. Anyone who condones or commits an act of terrorism in the name of Islam is simply not following Islam and is, in fact, violating its very tenets. These people are individuals with their own personal views and agendas. Fanatical Muslims are no more representative of the true teachings of Islam than fanatical Christians are of the true teachings of Christianity or fanatical Jews are of the true teachings of Judaism. The most prominent examples of such "religious" fanatics are Anders Behring Breivik, the 2011 Norwegian terrorist who claimed in his manifesto to be "100 percent Christian" and Baruch Goldstein, perpetrator of the 1994 Hebron massacre who is considered by some Jews to be a "hero" and a "saint". Extremism and fanaticism are problems not exclusive to Muslims. Anyone who thinks that all Muslims are terrorists should remember that the former boxer Muhammad Ali, perhaps the most celebrated person of our era, is a practicing Muslim.

22) The word "jihad" does not mean "holy war". It actually means "to struggle" or "to strive". In a religious context it means the struggle to successfully surrender one's will to the will of God. Some Muslims may say they are going for "jihad" when fighting in a war to defend themselves or others, but they say this because they are conceding that it will be a tremendous struggle. But there are many other forms of jihad which are much more relevant to the everyday life of a Muslim such as the struggles against laziness, arrogance, stinginess, one's own ego, or the struggle against a tyrant ruler or against the temptations of Satan, etc. Regarding the so-called verses of "holy war" in the Qur'an, two points: A) The term "holy war" neither appears in the Arabic text of the Qur'an nor in any classical teachings of Islam. B) The vast majority of verses in the Qur'an pertaining to violence refer to wartime situations in which Muslims were permitted to defend themselves against violent aggression. Any rational, intellectual analysis of the context and historical circumstances surrounding such verses, often ignored by pundits or violent extremists, proves this to be true. Other verses of violence deal with stopping oppression, capital punishment and the like.

23) Women are not oppressed in Islam. Any Muslim man that oppresses a woman is not following Islam. Among the many teachings of Muhammad that protected the rights and dignity of women is his saying, "...the best among you are those who treat their wives well."

24) Islam grants women many rights in the home and in society. Among them are the right to earn money, to financial support, to own property, to an education, to an inheritance, to being treated kindly, to vote, to a bridal gift, to keep their maiden name, to worship in a mosque, to a divorce, and so on.

25) Muslim women wear the head-covering (hijab) in fulfillment of God's decree to dress modestly. This type of modest dress has been worn by religious women throughout time such as traditional Catholic nuns, Mother Teresa and the Virgin Mary.

26) Forced marriages, honor killings, female genital mutilation and the confinement of women to their homes are all forbidden in Islam. These practices stem from deeply entrenched cultural traditions and/or ignorance of the true Islamic teachings or how to apply them in society. Arranged marriages are allowed in Islam but are not required. In fact, one of the conditions for a valid Islamic marriage contract is the mutual consent of both parties to the marriage. And divorce is permissible provided the Islamic guidelines are followed which protect the rights of all affected parties, especially women and unborn children.

27) Islam and the Nation "of Islam" are two different religions. Islam is a religion for all races and enjoins the worship of the One Unseen God who never took human form. On the other hand "the Nation" is a movement geared towards non-whites that teaches God appeared as a man named Fard Muhammad and that Elijah Muhammad was a prophet. According to orthodox Islam these are blasphemous beliefs that contradict the basic theology defined throughout the Qur'an and other authentic texts. The followers of "the Nation" adhere to some Islamic principles that are mixed with other practices and beliefs completely alien to authentic Islamic teachings. To better understand the differences read about Malcolm X, his pilgrimage to Mecca and his subsequent comments to the media. Islam teaches equality amongst the races (Qur'an 49:13).

28) All Muslims are not Arab, Middle-Eastern or of African descent. Islam is a universal religion and way of life that includes followers from all races. There are Muslims in and from virtually every country in the world. Arabs only constitute about 20% of Muslims worldwide. The country today with the largest Muslim population is not located in the Middle East. It is Indonesia with over 200 million Muslims. India ranks second with 175 million.

29) In the five daily prayers Muslims face the Kaaba in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It is a cube-shaped stone structure that was built by Prophet Abraham and his son Ishmael on the same foundations where Prophet Adam is believed to have built a sanctuary for the worship of the One God. Muslims do not worship the Kaaba. It serves as a focal point for Muslims around the world, unifying them in worship and symbolizing their common belief, spiritual focus and direction. Interestingly the inside of the Kaaba is empty.

30) The hajj is an annual pilgrimage to the Kaaba made by about 3 million Muslims from all corners of the Earth. It is performed to fulfill one of the pillars of Islam. The rituals of hajj commemorate the struggles of Abraham, his wife Hagar and their son Ishmael in surrendering their wills to God.
http://www.30factsaboutislam.com/
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"Although it is not true that all conservatives are stupid people, it is true that most stupid people are conservative."
John Stuart Mill

Willful ignorance, PaTROLLing, bullying, dishonesty, and hypocrisy are among the traits that are common amongst those that espouse the Republican/Conservative/Tea Party ideology.

A non-response doesn't mean you've won, it merely means the obnoxious, illiterate, right-wing morons have taken too much of my time already.

excelsior

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #186 on: September 16, 2014, 04:32:25 PM »

It's true, I'm not well versed on the issue

You had me fooled.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #187 on: September 16, 2014, 04:36:50 PM »


Interesting discussion starts around the 1:20 mark.

Bill Maher Battles Charlie Rose on Why Islam is More Dangerous than Other Religions
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Islam, the religion of peace...
« Reply #188 on: September 18, 2014, 08:06:18 PM »

It will be interesting to hear the details of this story in the coming days.


Australia Raids Thwarted ISIS Beheading Plot

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/australian-leader-warns-planned-random-attack-25585654

The Islamic State plot to carry out random beheadings in Sydney alleged by police is a simple and barbaric scheme that has shaken Australians. But terrorism experts on Friday questioned whether the ruthless movement had the capacity or inclination to sustain a terror campaign so far from the Middle East.

Police said they thwarted a plot to carry out beheadings in Australia by Islamic State group supporters when they raided more than a dozen properties across Sydney on Thursday.

Two of the 15 suspects detained by police were charged in court on Thursday, officials said.

Nine others were freed before the day was over.

Some terrorism experts saw the plot as a potential shift in Islamic State's focus from creating an Islamic caliphate in the Middle East. Others, including Professor of International Relations and Security Studies at Murdoch University, Samuel Makinda, said it is more likely a symptom of policy confusion within a disparate group.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises
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