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Author Topic: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?  (Read 3213 times)

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Matt (formerly ML)

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What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« on: October 18, 2007, 10:55:55 PM »

Like the subject says: what is the morally right basis upon which one human interacts with another human?
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lordfly

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2007, 07:09:39 AM »

Be nice to me so I'm nice to you.

OR ILL KILL YOU! :P
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your mom goes to college.

Greg Chamberlain

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2007, 10:37:36 AM »

Do what my god says or I'll smite thee, yo!

Okay, I changed my mind about this reponse because I've been telling ML for a long time to create a place for us to discuss his thoughts on morality and it would be kinda stupid for me to take a crap in it.

So, the right basis for human interaction. Let's begin that people have the right to life, liberty and property, and go from there.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 10:43:56 AM by Greg Chamberlain »
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"To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement." - Thomas Jefferson

Matt (formerly ML)

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2007, 05:57:00 AM »

...I've been telling ML for a long time to create a place for us to discuss his thoughts on morality...
You have? I don't recall that.

I see the question I asked as a binary thing: either "this" or "that".
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chuntley

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collective thoughts
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2007, 08:32:42 AM »

use to be " Do unto others as you, Would have them do unto you".

Today it's "Do unto others, Before they Do unto you".

Walk tall with Big Stick a Swinging.

It is about wheather you are a winner or a looser.

Hold the other Guy Accountable, Before he has the chance to hold you accountable.

It's not about being sucessful, as long as you look successful.

Starting pay expected $20.00/hr,, reality $7.00/hr.

Dream big, and let someone else do the leg and back work.

This Couch is my best friend.

You want me to do what????? JOBBBBB,,,,, why? I have everything I need.

I Love you and Dad soooo much, I'm never moving out.


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Matt (formerly ML)

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2007, 10:51:03 PM »

Here's what I had in mind when I started this thread: all human interaction is either voluntary or involuntary.

For example, when you purchase something from someone, that relationship is voluntary. When someone steals something from you, that relationship is involuntary.

Only voluntary relationships can be morally good, because they're based on mutual consent. Involuntary relationships are not. They are based on negligence, fraud, or force and can only be morally wrong.

The number of people involved in the interaction cannot change the underlying morality.
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Greg Chamberlain

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2007, 09:05:42 AM »

Only voluntary relationships can be morally good, because they're based on mutual consent. Involuntary relationships are not. They are based on negligence, fraud, or force and can only be morally wrong.

I disagree. I can think of an instance where voluntary relationships can be morally wrong; statutory rape. And I can think of an involuntary relationship that is morally right; using force to prevent someone from committing suicide.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2007, 11:18:18 AM by Greg Chamberlain »
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"To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement." - Thomas Jefferson

Matt (formerly ML)

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2007, 06:56:58 AM »

I disagree. I can think of an instance where voluntary relationships can be morally wrong; statutory rape. And I can think of an involuntary relationship that is morally right; using force to prevent someone from committing suicide.

Statutory rape is illegal precisely because the relationship is not voluntary. People younger than some arbitrary age are deemed to be incapable of understanding what it is to which they're consenting. Unfortunately, that legal age is very, very arbitrary: Check out the first map here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_consent

Preventing suicide is no more right than committing murder, because other peoples' lives are not yours. Is it morally good to compel someone to continue living in debilitating agony? Should Robin Prosser have been forced to continue living in misery?: http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2007/10/27/news/local/news02.txt
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marilyn.monroe

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2007, 07:31:11 AM »

Statutory rape is illegal precisely because the relationship is not voluntary. People younger than some arbitrary age are deemed to be incapable of understanding what it is to which they're consenting. Unfortunately, that legal age is very, very arbitrary: Check out the first map here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_consent

Preventing suicide is no more right than committing murder, because other peoples' lives are not yours. Is it morally good to compel someone to continue living in debilitating agony? Should Robin Prosser have been forced to continue living in misery?: http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2007/10/27/news/local/news02.txt

if anyone wants my kids consent, they can ask me for it.  ;)   Kid = under 18 to me.

i would try to stop someone from committing suicide if i could. i think you are wrong to say preventing suicide is akin to committing murder.
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Greg Chamberlain

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2007, 09:22:35 AM »

Okay, so fine you get to add a bunch of clauses and exceptions about who is able to consent voluntarily and who can't and under what circumstances. That makes it a lot less of a simple "binary thing", doesn't it?
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"To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement." - Thomas Jefferson

Fred Munny

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2007, 03:16:27 PM »

Okay, so fine you get to add a bunch of clauses and exceptions about who is able to consent voluntarily and who can't and under what circumstances. That makes it a lot less of a simple "binary thing", doesn't it?

It could still be binary, just not single digit.
1100111001011110010000101010010011101010001001010111000100001111001111110
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Matt (formerly ML)

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2007, 09:53:07 PM »

i would try to stop someone from committing suicide if i could.
Even if that person was in agony and had been for a long time, with no relief available?
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Matt (formerly ML)

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2007, 10:08:11 PM »

Okay, so fine you get to add a bunch of clauses and exceptions about who is able to consent voluntarily and who can't and under what circumstances. That makes it a lot less of a simple "binary thing", doesn't it?
Nope, it's still all about voluntary versus involuntary relationships.

The complexity of who, when, how, where, and why doesn't change the underlying principle. All it means is that people who write laws wouldn't be able to use a single arbitrary and overly simplistic measure like age.
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Greg Chamberlain

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2007, 01:01:41 PM »

Nope, it's still all about voluntary versus involuntary relationships.

The complexity of who, when, how, where, and why doesn't change the underlying principle. All it means is that people who write laws wouldn't be able to use a single arbitrary and overly simplistic measure like age.

Okay, that's an interesting approach. Now how well does it apply to real life?
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"To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement." - Thomas Jefferson

Greg Chamberlain

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Re: What Is the Right Basis for Human Interaction?
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2007, 01:02:48 PM »

And I do know where you're going with this ML, you sly devil.
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"To preserve the freedom of the human mind then and freedom of the press, every spirit should be ready to devote itself to martyrdom; for as long as we may think as we will, and speak as we think, the condition of man will proceed in improvement." - Thomas Jefferson
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