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The Fuzz

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #135 on: June 30, 2013, 01:04:43 PM »

LMAO!  You guys had to of heard that chuckle that just originated from Southern Illinois all the way up to Monroe!

That's a classic, BRD!
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BigRedDog

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #136 on: June 30, 2013, 01:13:59 PM »

LMAO!  You guys had to of heard that chuckle that just originated from Southern Illinois all the way up to Monroe!

That's a classic, BRD!

Just looking out for everyone's 'well being' Fuzz ;) ;) ;)
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BigRedDog

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #137 on: June 30, 2013, 01:49:51 PM »

I don't ever remember the grapes looking this good before...

we have Niagara and Concorde both...

they're going to be loaded if everything holds up :) :) :)

I'll try to remember to take a picture of them :o :o :o


It does look like the rain is really making the grapes grow although I've heard that if they soak up too much water too fast they can 'pop' or rip the skin open!

These are the Concords...  they're already 'huge' so I'm more concerned they'll be the ones to bust open!!!



And these are the Niagaras...   a new plant 2 years ago if I recall right...  didn't do a thing the first 2 years but they've finally started to take off!!!

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Professor H

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #138 on: June 30, 2013, 03:43:56 PM »

Ahem,  you don't need a whole crew...

One retired Paramedic should do   ;)
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The Fuzz

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #139 on: June 30, 2013, 05:27:16 PM »

LOL.....voyeurism is kinda hot I guess!
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #140 on: June 30, 2013, 11:22:00 PM »

We've survived the drought last year with over 80% yield,
now I'm looking at the potential issues with too much rain,
but so far no real stress issues,   good thing we invested in some good tiling a few years back!

Haven't had animals in a while on our farm - so I've never been involved in bailing or storage...   sounds like it could be a good year.   Do you sell it close by or out of state?
I had a friend who would haul it down south to sell, and never could figure out if it was worth it.

Racetrack hay.  Lots of people burned with bad checks.

I sell mine out of the barn and word of mouth.  I have people in Ohio that will buy it all...if I can get it made.  Might be running hay this late fall.
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BigRedDog

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #141 on: July 01, 2013, 11:23:14 AM »

We've survived the drought last year with over 80% yield,
now I'm looking at the potential issues with too much rain,
but so far no real stress issues,   good thing we invested in some good tiling a few years back!

Haven't had animals in a while on our farm - so I've never been involved in bailing or storage...   sounds like it could be a good year.   Do you sell it close by or out of state?
I had a friend who would haul it down south to sell, and never could figure out if it was worth it.


We have one neighbor that sells a lot of their excess at the auction in Manchester.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manchester-Hay-Auction/378863308849473
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blue2

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #142 on: July 01, 2013, 12:06:28 PM »

I don't have a lot of excess since I cut way back on size of garden.  I give stuff to both kids plus 3 neighbors that don't have a garden.  And when I overload them they give to friends.
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #143 on: July 01, 2013, 05:11:05 PM »


We have one neighbor that sells a lot of their excess at the auction in Manchester.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manchester-Hay-Auction/378863308849473

My philosophy is why pay 10-15% to an auctioneer (and have to haul it there and stack it up) when I can sell it right out of the barn.  Personally, I believe the Archbold hay auction (at Yoder and Frey) has a better selection and distance wise, it's a wash.  The premium fee at Archbold is 5% btw.

There are more than enough local horse people to buy the majority of it and whats left goes to Ohio to more horse people, well, they come here and get it.

I had inquires from as far away as New Mexico for hay this year.  While it's wet here, NM and Arizona are still in drought conditions.   Nothing has changed out there as evidenced by the wildfires.  No moisture.  Had one guy that was wanting to come and load it right out of the field with his own crew on semi trailers and take it back west at $4.50 per bale but the rain put a damper oin that.

The issue now for me and row croppers is getting in to a field without rutting it.  It will take literally weeks for the ground to firm up (if it stopped raining today) and I don't believe it will.

The wheat is turning and lots of it is down from the rain and wind but you can't combine it because it's too wet.

Unless we have a drastic shift in weather patterns over July and August, hay prices will stay high.  Last winter, all the excess in barns got used up and then some so there is no surplus left.  I saw hay prices exceed 12 bucks a bale for small squares last January locally.  Hay prices like that are usually only in Florida for racetrack hay.  I think we will have a repeat or close to it, this winter.

According the the Hay and Forage Grower (magazine), prices will stabilize at $6.00 per small square bale or $190 per ton for rounds through the end of 2013 with some local prices even higher depending on demand and availability.

Keep in mind that hay as a feedstock for horses and cattle is cost prohibitive to transport so loacally grown is locally consumed and over the last decade, farmers have converted hayfields to more profitable crops like e-corn so acres in hay has been on the decline.

Declining acreage with steady to increased demand drives prices up as well.

Myself, I have no issue with the hay prices.  For years we basically gave it away, factoring in machinery cost, fuel and labor it was break even maybe.  Now, it's make some money.  Isn't that what free enterprise is all about?
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BigRedDog

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #144 on: July 01, 2013, 06:22:36 PM »

My philosophy is why pay 10-15% to an auctioneer (and have to haul it there and stack it up) when I can sell it right out of the barn.  Personally, I believe the Archbold hay auction (at Yoder and Frey) has a better selection and distance wise, it's a wash.  The premium fee at Archbold is 5% btw.

There are more than enough local horse people to buy the majority of it and whats left goes to Ohio to more horse people, well, they come here and get it.

I had inquires from as far away as New Mexico for hay this year.  While it's wet here, NM and Arizona are still in drought conditions.   Nothing has changed out there as evidenced by the wildfires.  No moisture.  Had one guy that was wanting to come and load it right out of the field with his own crew on semi trailers and take it back west at $4.50 per bale but the rain put a damper oin that.

The issue now for me and row croppers is getting in to a field without rutting it.  It will take literally weeks for the ground to firm up (if it stopped raining today) and I don't believe it will.

The wheat is turning and lots of it is down from the rain and wind but you can't combine it because it's too wet.

Unless we have a drastic shift in weather patterns over July and August, hay prices will stay high.  Last winter, all the excess in barns got used up and then some so there is no surplus left.  I saw hay prices exceed 12 bucks a bale for small squares last January locally.  Hay prices like that are usually only in Florida for racetrack hay.  I think we will have a repeat or close to it, this winter.

According the the Hay and Forage Grower (magazine), prices will stabilize at $6.00 per small square bale or $190 per ton for rounds through the end of 2013 with some local prices even higher depending on demand and availability.

Keep in mind that hay as a feedstock for horses and cattle is cost prohibitive to transport so loacally grown is locally consumed and over the last decade, farmers have converted hayfields to more profitable crops like e-corn so acres in hay has been on the decline.

Declining acreage with steady to increased demand drives prices up as well.

Myself, I have no issue with the hay prices.  For years we basically gave it away, factoring in machinery cost, fuel and labor it was break even maybe.  Now, it's make some money.  Isn't that what free enterprise is all about?

I've got a hunch most of what he's taking over there isn't what you'd call 'hay'...

it looks to me like baled grass and weeds :-\ :-\ :-\

He probably doesn't want too many people knowing were he lives :o :o :o
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #145 on: July 02, 2013, 12:46:39 AM »

That's funny.  I've learned over the years that most horsey people don't have a clue what good hay even looks like.  Their idea of 'good' hay is a heavy green bale and they pay a lot of money for hay that's well on it's way to molding.

The big myth about horse hay is horse owners think that their plug needs alfalfa hay and that's the farthest thing from what old plug should have.  Idle horses only need good grass hay with a bit of alfalfa or clover, water and a supplement like a mineral/salt block.  Only working horses like race horses or pulling horses or athletic horses like hunter-jumpers or dressage horses need a larger percentage of alfalfa or alfalfa/timothy.  That old plug/ornament horse only needs low protein hay.

My 'deal breaker' when I go to a hay auction is my Delmhorst Digital Moisture Probe.  I set the threshold alarm at 18% RM and walk along and stick bales at random.  In short order I get a crowd following me watching the meter (it reads percentage of moisture digitally) and listening for the alarm.  Of course the sellers don't like me, but I'm not there to be liked.  I'm there buying hay for a customer, one reason I like the Archbold auction, the auctioneer knows me and they know I'll pay a good price for good hay, which I did last year representing my customers that ran low because we basically got one good cut.  The Delmhorst was the best 600 bucks I ever spent.  I even have an attachment that allows me to moisture check windrowed hay in the field, prior to bailing.

Now, if it would just quit raining long enough for me to bring down the 40 rounds I have up the road in a barn, to my barn, weed the garden and mow the lawn, I'd be tickled.  An added plus would be fertilizing the hay fields with urea and foiliar innoculant.

The garden is pretty sad.  It's growing and so are the weeds.  My spuds got a good head start on the weeds but the corn and beans are iffy.
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Professor H

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #146 on: July 02, 2013, 08:42:26 AM »

What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.

Do you have the same dangers of spontaneous combustion with damp hay - that is found with damp straw?

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SidecarFlip

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #147 on: July 02, 2013, 12:07:37 PM »

What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.

Do you have the same dangers of spontaneous combustion with damp hay - that is found with damp straw?

Hay ride sounds better.

Absolutely.  I never bale above 12%RM because when you bale, you compact the forage whether it's in rounds, squares or large squares and when compacted (squeezed) it naturally warms up.  Rule of thumb is bales will see a temperature rise to about 120-130 degrees (f) after bailing when the moisture is right at 12% and the RM will climb to 18% or so as they hay 'cures'.

The problem occurs when the forage is too wet (above 12%RM) and it gets bailed.  In the old days, older bailers weren't mechanically capable of bailing hay with a higher RM.  Shear pins broke and bailing stopped.  Not so today.  The newer high capacity bailers can bale at any moisture value so you have to watch the RM all the time.  In fact, some bailers are designed and built to just bale at high RM for silage operations.

Bales with high initial RM (over 12%) can heat up to ignition temperatures but long before spontaneous igniton occurs, the hay is junk because it's molding.  The mold spores actually generate the heat as they consume the protein in the plant.

Thats why I chuckle at horsey people at hay auctions buying heavy, green bales.  Inside those bales, those microorganisms are busy eating the plant matter, generating heat and remdering the hay worthless.

You never feed  bales from the field immediately.  It needs to 'cure' or stabilize for a couple weeks prior to feeding.

The best way for someone to tell if a bale is good forage or not, is to smell it and heft it.  Pull the flakes apart and stick your nose in.  If it smells good, it's good.  If it smells musty, it's moldy even if you can't see any white dust (mold spores).  If it's heavy in comparison to size, chances are good, it's no good but to be sure do the nose test.  Modern small square bailers (like I own) can make 100 pound plus bales that are compact.  100 pounds is usually considered a heavy wet bale but in my case, the RM is below 12% and the forage is fine.  I make bales like that for contract customers.  Never for public sale.  I run a 36-38" bale in poly with an  average weight of 40-50 pounds.

After all, most people buy by the bale.  I buy by the ton  if at all possible.
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The Fuzz

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #148 on: July 03, 2013, 07:07:19 AM »

What I always found funny is most people don't even know the difference - and those "hay rides" people took were really straw rides.


I used to call them for what they resulted in......Tail Rides!
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Gardening
« Reply #149 on: July 03, 2013, 10:05:53 PM »

I used to call them for what they resulted in......Tail Rides!

Pervert.... ;D
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