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Monroe Native

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2013, 07:31:31 AM »

Uhhhh....  drones have been around how long now?
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I have learned that only two things are necessary to keep one's wife happy. First, let her think she's having her own way. And second, let her have it.
Lyndon B. Johnson

You do not examine legislation in the light of the benefits it will convey if properly administered, but in the light of the wrongs it would do and the harms it would cause if improperly administered.
Lyndon B. Johnson

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #31 on: June 13, 2013, 02:49:04 AM »

Uhhhh....  drones have been around how long now?
Again you've shown you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...not sure if the city schools can be blamed or perhaps it's more indicative that some people are incapable of learning.

Simply clicking the link may have saved yourself a bit of embarrassment.

But then any attempt to intelligently comment could've possibly interfered with your role on MT as the chief antagonist.
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #32 on: June 13, 2013, 08:30:30 AM »

Again you've shown you have zero knowledge of the subject matter...not sure if the city schools can be blamed or perhaps it's more indicative that some people are incapable of learning.

Simply clicking the link may have saved yourself a bit of embarrassment.

But then any attempt to intelligently comment could've possibly interfered with your role on MT as the chief antagonist.


Thanks for the name calling.  You have once again lived up to your role as being righteously acrimonious.

I think you've taken the title of "chief antagonist" a long time ago.  Don't be so humble.
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I have learned that only two things are necessary to keep one's wife happy. First, let her think she's having her own way. And second, let her have it.
Lyndon B. Johnson

You do not examine legislation in the light of the benefits it will convey if properly administered, but in the light of the wrongs it would do and the harms it would cause if improperly administered.
Lyndon B. Johnson

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #33 on: June 27, 2013, 05:13:08 AM »

"The peculiar circumstances of journalist Michael Hastings' death in Los Angeles last week have unleashed a wave of conspiracy theories.

Now there's another theory to contribute to the paranoia: According to a prominent security analyst, technology exists that could've allowed someone to hack his car. Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke told The Huffington Post that what is known about the single-vehicle crash is "consistent with a car cyber attack."*

There have been several theories about the fatal car crash that caused the death of esteemed journalist, Michael Hastings. Prominent security analyist Richard Clarke, the former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism, is saying that the evidence we have on Michael Hastings crash is actually consistent with a cyber attack; it is possible his car was hacked. Clarke is not a conspiracy theory crackpot-- his words should not be debunked as quackery. At the very least, the crash deserves much more investigation. If the allegations of car cyber attacks are even plausible, this is a truly terrifying development people the world over should care about.

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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #34 on: June 27, 2013, 05:17:17 AM »

Was Michael Hastings' Car Hacked? Richard Clarke Says It's Possible

The peculiar circumstances of journalist Michael Hastings' death in Los Angeles last week have unleashed a wave of conspiracy theories.

Now there's another theory to contribute to the paranoia: According to a prominent security analyst, technology exists that could've allowed someone to hack his car. Former U.S. National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism Richard Clarke told The Huffington Post that what is known about the single-vehicle crash is "consistent with a car cyber attack."

Clarke said, "There is reason to believe that intelligence agencies for major powers" -- including the United States -- know how to remotely seize control of a car.

"What has been revealed as a result of some research at universities is that it's relatively easy to hack your way into the control system of a car, and to do such things as cause acceleration when the driver doesn't want acceleration, to throw on the brakes when the driver doesn't want the brakes on, to launch an air bag," Clarke told The Huffington Post. "You can do some really highly destructive things now, through hacking a car, and it's not that hard."

"So if there were a cyber attack on the car -- and I'm not saying there was," Clarke added, "I think whoever did it would probably get away with it."

Authorities have said that it may take weeks to determine a cause of death for Hastings, but that no foul play is suspected.

Hastings was driving a 2013 Mercedes C250 coupe when he crashed into a tree on Highland Ave. in Los Angeles at approximately 4:30 am on June 18. Video posted online showed the car in flames, and one neighbor told a local news crew she heard a sound like an explosion. Another eyewitness said the car's engine had been thrown 50 to 60 yards from the car. There were no other vehicles involved in the accident.

The fire was so all-consuming that it took the Los Angeles County coroner's office two days to identify Hastings' body, but Clarke said a cyber attack on the vehicle would have been nearly impossible to trace "even if the dozen or so computers on board hadn't melted."

Hastings practiced a brand of no-holds-barred journalism that tended to anger powerful people. His 2010 profile of Gen. Stanley McChrystal, published in Rolling Stone, was so damaging that it ostensibly prompted President Barack Obama to fire the general (the president denied that the article had a role in his decision).

In the days before his death, Hastings was reportedly working on a story about a lawsuit filed by Jill Kelley, who was involved in the scandal that brought down Gen. David Petraeus, according to the LA Times. KTLA reported that Hastings told colleagues at the news site BuzzFeed that he feared the FBI was investigating him. On June 20, the FBI denied that any investigation was under way.

"I believe the FBI when they say they weren't investigating him," said Clarke. "That was very unusual, and I'm sure they checked very carefully before they said that."

Clarke worked for the State Department under President Ronald Reagan and headed up counterterrorism efforts under Presidents George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He also served as a special adviser on cyberterrorism to the younger Bush and published a book on the topic, Cyber War, in 2010.

"I'm not a conspiracy guy. In fact, I've spent most of my life knocking down conspiracy theories," said Clarke, who ran afoul of the second Bush administration when he criticized the decision to invade Iraq after 9/11. "But my rule has always been you don't knock down a conspiracy theory until you can prove it [wrong]. And in the case of Michael Hastings, what evidence is available publicly is consistent with a car cyber attack. And the problem with that is you can't prove it."

Clarke said the Los Angeles Police Department likely wouldn't have the expertise to trace such an attack. "I think you'd probably need the very best of the U.S. government intelligence or law enforcement officials to discover it."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/24/michael-hastings-car-hacked_n_3492339.html
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #35 on: June 30, 2013, 05:02:03 PM »

The World's Fresh Water Could Be Depleted Within 2 Generations, Scientists Turn To The Seas (VIDEO)

A statement was released recently claiming that within two generations the general population will be struggling with massive water shortages, so chemists are looking to the seas for a new supply.

The research team created a method for removing salt from water using small electrical fields, according to a University of Texas press release.

The new system, called electrochemically mediated seawater desalination, is very low-energy and able to run on a simple store-bought battery. It eliminates the high-energy waste of past methods and doesn't need a membrane to serve its function.

"The availability of water for drinking and crop irrigation is one of the most basic requirements for maintaining and improving human health," said Richard Crooks of The University of Texas at Austin. "Seawater desalination is one way to address this need, but most current methods for desalinating water rely on expensive and easily contaminated membranes.

"The membrane-free method we've developed still needs to be refined and scaled up, but if we can succeed at that, then one day it might be possible to provide fresh water on a massive scale using a simple, even portable, system," he said.

We don't have to wait for the world's fresh water to run dry to put this technology to good use. About a third of the planet is already thirsty and living in water-stressed areas.

"People are dying because of a lack of freshwater," Tony Frudakis, founder and CEO of Okeanos Technologies said. "And they'll continue to do so until there is some kind of breakthrough, and that is what we are hoping our technology will represent."

In order to desalinize the water, the researchers apply three volts of electricity a plastic chip filled with salty water. There's a microchannel with two branches inside of the chip. At the channel's junction an electrode neutralizes a portion of the chloride ions to create an "ion depletion zone" which increases the electric field. The field redirects the salt into one branch of the microchannel, removing it from the water.

"The neutralization reaction occurring at the electrode is key to removing the salts in seawater," said Kyle Knust, first author of the paper. "This was a proof of principle. We've made comparable performance improvements while developing other applications based on the formation of an ion depletion zone. That suggests that 99 percent desalination is not beyond our reach."

The only problem is the current size of the device, a much larger system would have to be built in order to provide water to a group of people. The researchers are confident this can be accomplished.

"You could build a disaster relief array or a municipal-scale unit," Frudakis said. "Okeanos has even contemplated building a small system that would look like a Coke machine and would operate in a standalone fashion to produce enough water for a small village."

http://www.hngn.com/articles/6541/20130628/worlds-fresh-water-depleted-within-2-generations-scientists-turn-seas.htm

===========

Desalination Device Could Mean Fresh Water for All [VIDEO]

A month after 500 of the world's leading water scientists issued the stark warning that in two generations, the majority of humanity will be facing a shortage of fresh water, researchers have introduced a new method for the desalination of seawater that consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques.

Capable of running off of a store-bought battery, the process evades the problems confronting current desalination methods by eliminating the need for a membrane and by separating salt and water at a microscale.
 More here:
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/2702/20130628/desalination-device-mean-fresh-water-video.htm

=========

Current methods for removing the salt from seawater to make it drinkable involve a lot of time and energy, but scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Marburg in Germany have invented something that may drastically change how we desalt ocean water. The new solution requires so little energy, in fact, that it can be operated with a store-bought battery, the scientists explained in a press release.

More here:
http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/new-desalination-method-can-run-on-store-bought-battery-researchers-say/

==========

http://news.discovery.com/tech/tiny-channels-take-salt-from-seawater-130628.htm
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #36 on: June 30, 2013, 05:27:09 PM »

Okay...knowing this forum has been historically popular with engineers...chemical or otherwise...and just in case venture capitalists, geologists, and entrepreneurs...here's something with great potential:

Processing Is Key Element in US Rare-Earth Woes

 Red state or blue state, liberal or libertarian, Americans share an addiction to rare-earth elements imported from China.

Green technologies such as electric cars, wind turbines, solar panels and fluorescent light bulbs rely on rare-earth metals. The military depends on rare earths for guided missile systems, satellites and unmanned drones. NASA's spacecraft carry powerful rare earth magnets to Mars and outer space. The magnets also miniaturized iPads, computers and high-tech headphones.

China controls 95 percent of the world's rare-earth supply. The key to this monopoly isn't an abundance of rare-earth deposits, but its expertise in processing ore into oxides and pure metal. The ore tends to carry uranium and thorium, the most radioactive element on the planet, and extracting the metal is typically a long, multistage process involving toxic chemicals.

"We know where the deposits are. Having them end up in your iPhone is not a straight or simple process," said Brad Van Gosen, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver.

A few years ago, China showed its power, and cut the supply of rare earths to a trickle. The move sent the United States and other countries scrambling to end their reliance on China. Prices soared, drawing new investors and mining companies into the rare earth market. Now, the United States has one new mine nearly finished and two more in the permitting stages. But the crucial element in escaping China's rare-earth rule isn't new mines, it's rebuilding the expertise and infrastructure to process the finicky metals, experts say.

Price war

In 2010, China spiked the cost of rare-earth elements when it started restricting exports and charging foreign companies higher prices. The price bubble sparked a worldwide frenzy to escape China's control. A new Australian-owned processing plant just opened in Malaysia. Others are planned in Canada, Europe and Africa. Several companies are also trying to develop an American supply for rare earths, some with support from the Department of Defense. [Infographic: Energy-Critical Elements to Watch]

"The rare earths are very much strategic metals, and particularly very much of strategic importance to the defense industry," said Curt Freeman, president of Avalon Development Corp. in Fairbanks, Alaska, a mining consulting firm. "There's a queasy feeling in Congress and the Department of Defense," he said.

In the United States, California's Mountain Pass mine reopened in 2010 and is expected to start producing light rare-earth elements this year. The mine was once the world's biggest producers of rare earths, but shut down in 2002 because of environmental problems and falling prices. Another mine is proposed in Wyoming, by Canadian company Rare Element Resources, but faces opposition from local residents.

Alaska's newest resource


 One of the biggest rare-earth gambles is at Alaska's Bokan Mountain. Once mined for uranium, the granite peak on Prince of Wales Island contains rich veins of the harder-to-find heavy rare-earth elements. The project has strong support from Alaska's legislature and from nearby communities. A Canadian company plans to extract the ore and transform it into oxides with a custom-built processing plant. Therein lies the challenge.

Despite their name, rare earths are actually common in Earth's crust, though in low concentrations. The moniker is a holdover from the 19th century, when researchers discovered the oddly named elements in rarely found minerals. The 17 elements share a close affinity, with similar chemical properties and atomic weights. Bokan Mountain is one of the few spots on Earth with a bounty of heavy rare-earth elements, which have higher atomic weights. It's especially elevated in yttrium, which appears in everything from cubic zirconia and car pollution sensors to lasers, rockets and jet engines.

Because rare earths are often all mixed together in one rock, separating the heavy rare earths usually requires removing the lighter ones first. This is typically done with a series of chemical tanks and solvents. Plus, there's the radioactive uranium to dispose of. But mine owner Ucore says it has a new solid-extraction technology that greatly simplifies this process. The technique relies on nanotechnology to remove impurities and concentrate the heavy rare earths into oxides, according to Ucore. The Department of Defense funded Ucore's ore extraction research with a contract in October 2012.

Costly withdrawal

 But a USGS-funded study found Bokan Mountain's vein system is very complex, with a mix of at least two dozen ore minerals, the agency's Van Gosen said. The study was published Jan. 22 in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences.

"It's getting more and more complicated the more we look at it," Van Gosen said.

Metals industry consultant Gareth Hatch notes that processing is the biggest hurdle for rare-earth mining companies.

 "Processing is the key challenge for deposits that particularly are skewed toward the middle and heavy rare earths, because they have some unusual minerals that haven't been processed before," said Hatch, founding principal of Technology Metals Research. Hatch is helping develop a rare earth processing company in Canada.

The USGS has several ongoing projects examining the geology of Bokan Mountain, to better understand how the minerals appeared.

"The idea is to develop a fundamental understanding of how these deposits get started in the first place in Earth's crust, and use it to go look for resources that the U.S. public needs," said Susan Karl, a USGS geologist based in Anchorage.

Ucore board member Jaroslav Dostal, an emeritus professor at Saint Mary's University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was lead author of the Bokan Mountain study. The grant program that provided funding for the study, the USGS Mineral Resources External Research Program, has awarded projects to private industry and foreign recipients in the past.

Investing in processing

 The USGS also has projects exploring the geology of other rare-earth deposits. Since 2010, the House of Representatives has introduced legislation to curb mining regulations and fund rare-earth research and development, which have yet to pass the Senate. Recycling of rare-earth metals, which is not always made possible with high-tech gadgetry, is another way to reduce dependency on China's supply. Earlier this year, the Department of Defense recommended stockpiling $120 million of critical heavy rare-earth elements. But industry experts say money would be better spent on building American expertise and infrastructure in processing rare earths. [The Common Elements of Innovation]

"In terms of full-blown capacity, Molycorp [in California] does have its light rare-earth separation facility, but other than that, there is really nothing in North America," Hatch, the industry consultant, said.

"The capability to process and convert [rare earths] from minerals into compounds that go into high-tech equipment is the key bottleneck not just in the U.S., but also the world," he said.
http://www.livescience.com/37356-heavy-rare-earth-mining-america.html
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"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #37 on: June 30, 2013, 05:31:48 PM »

Where to Find Rare Earth Elements

Every time I see a commercial for a new cell phone, I feel a bit nauseous. I love a new cell phone just like the next person, but because of my training as a materials scientist, I feel like a worker in a sausage factory. Cell phones, like sausages, may be great, but you don’t really want to know what it takes to make them.

Our lust for new devices isn’t sustainable, at least not yet. Some of the key materials used to make them, mainly rare earth elements, are in tight supply, in part because the primary source of rare earths are mines in one country, China. About 97% of rare earths come from China, which has become increasingly protective of its bounty.

Rare earth elements are peppered throughout your phone, from the glass display, making it harder, to magnets in speakers, headphones, and vibrating motors, making them more powerful despite their small size. China’s monopoly has driven up prices on rare earths, raising costs for manufacturers.

But cell phones aren’t the only products affected by the monopoly. They are found in electric cars, wind turbines, solar cells, and batteries—key components of a future powered by alternative energy. Demand for rare earths is high and certain to grow in the coming decades. A hybrid Toyota Prius, for example, uses nearly 20 pounds of rare earths in its battery alone. There are more than 2 million Priuses on the road, and it’s just one of many hybrid and electric vehicles being sold today. A restricted supply of rare earths could thwart efforts to wean ourselves off oil.

Digging Deeper

Now, rare earths are not common, but they’re actually not that rare, either. The name is leftover from the 15th century when “rare” referred to “strange” or “unusual” materials and “earths” were any mineral or a metal combined with oxygen. If you look at a periodic table, rare earths sit in a row at the bottom called the lanthanides. Those elements, from lanthanum on the left to lutetium on the right plus yttrium and scandium are called the rare earths.


Rare earth elements include the lanthanide series, ytterium, and scandium, highlighted here in light blue.

Rare earths are not easy to mine. Like many minerals, they aren’t often found in pure veins, so they need to be separated from the surrounding rock and from one another. But the difficulty in obtaining them hasn’t dampened demand. Rare earths are ubiquitous in the consumer electronics industry, not just cell phones. Nearly every item with an on-off switch contains rare earths.

From 1940 to 1990, the United States produced and mined its own rare earths. One huge mine in southern California, called Mountain Pass, was the biggest resource in the U.S. The invention of the color TV in the mid-1960s, which required the rare earth europium to produce the color red, put Mountain Pass on the map. Up until the late 1980s, the mine was the world’s biggest supplier of rare earths.

It wouldn’t last. Mountain Pass was shut down in 2002, having been knocked out by a one-two punch of environmental violations and globalized markets. One of the dirty little secrets about rare-earth mining is that a major by-product is radioactive waste in the form of thorium. As early as 1985, ground-water samples showed the tailing ponds were leaking. By the late 1990s, Mountain Pass had leaked 300,000 gallons on seven separate occasions, spoiling the surrounding desert, which is habitat for the endangered desert tortoise. But the real knockout blow came from China, which has its own substantial deposits. It also had cheap labor, so it could mine the minerals at lower prices. Deng Xiaoping, an influential politician in China, recognized the importance of rare earths in 1992, when he said, “The Middle East has oil, but China has rare earths.” Production in China grew rapidly between 1990-2000, from 16,000 to 73,000 metric tons, an increase of 450%. Meanwhile, production in other countries dropped by 60%.

Sea Change

The tables may be turning, though. In 2004, the owner of Mountain Pass, Molycorp, pledged that it had cleaned up its act and was granted a permit to restart the mining of rare earths. It takes many years to reboot such an involved operation, but in 2012, Molycorp said they were on track to produce nearly 20,000 metric tons of rare earths. This year, that amount should double.

Many countries, including the U.S., Australia, India, Brazil, Vietnam, and Russia, are looking for new deposits of their own. Japanese scientists found large amounts of rare earth elements in mud at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, and similar studies have shown they’re also in mud in Jamaica. In the far future, we could even turn to the Moon, which is unusually rich in rare earths.

Over the next few years, says Thomas Graedel, an industrial ecologist at Yale University and an expert in rare earths, the U.S. government should encourage domestic production at Mountain Pass. That’s because it takes up to 12 years to make a new mine operational, and we’ll certainly need more rare earths in the intervening years. “We [should] push Congress to do what is possible to help Mountain Pass remain a reasonable business,” he says.

Mining Your Desk Drawers


But that’s not all we can do. One way we can all contribute is by digging our old cell phones out of our desks. Each phone contains up to a few grams of rare earths. That might not seem like much, but when you add up the over 500 million retired cell phones that live in desk drawers, closets, and shoeboxes, you start to get somewhere. Recycling old electronics will not only free up valuable rare earths, but also copper, gold, palladium, and platinum. Think of your used cell phone as a miniature gold mine.

Companies would be wise to initiate incentives to promote this recycling habit, too. Currently, only about 1% of cell phones get recycled. Credits toward new purchases or gift cards could get things rolling. In the meantime, you can drop off your retired cell phones at certain businesses (the EPA maintains a list), or they can be mailed to a recycling facility or donated to a charity. Every little bit helps. Just think, if you recycle your old phone today, your future self may thank you for the brilliant new features on the iPhone 10.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/physics/rare-earth-elements-in-cell-phones/
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Frenchfry

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2013, 05:33:02 PM »

Are Rare Earth Metals a National Security Issue?

Currently there is a legislative proposal before the Armed Services Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives to encourage the U.S. Department of Defense to buy up volumes of strategic rare earth elements. According to Canadian rare earth minerals producer Ucore Rare Metals, the legislation calls for the U.S. government to spend $41 million to stockpile six critical metals, including dysprosium and yttrium.

The 17 so-called rare earth minerals, e.g., the lanthanides, scandium, and yttrium, as well as associated metals molybdenum and tungsten, are needed in the production of items such as cell phones, other popular consumer electronics, and batteries — as well as in electronics governing defense systems and missiles.

According to a report from IHS Chemical, in Houston, production and consumption of rare earth minerals totaled over 100,000 metric tons in 2012. IHS’s study estimates that from 2012 to 2017, global demand for rare earth products will grow by 7.6 percent annually and reach more than 150,000 metric tons, with China leading consumption growth at 8.3 percent annually.

Contrary to the term, rare earths are actually abundant — far more than silver and gold. Australia, the U.S., and other have nations have reserves. But world production is predominantly controlled by China — and now some are saying it is a national security issue for the U.S.

Access to rare earth elements has been a geopolitical hot button. China’s price undercutting in the 1990s has led to the discontinuance of extraction in other countries. China now controls about 95 percent of world rare earths volume, despite having just over 20 percent of the world’s proven reserves.

In January Rare Earth Investing News reported that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) allocated up to $120 million “for the creation of a rare earths research facility aimed at decreasing the nation’s dependence on rare earth elements from China. Called the Critical Materials Institute, its aim is to “bring together leading researchers from academia, the private sector, and four DOE national laboratories.”

The objective is to ensure a steady, dependable rare earths supply for domestic needs. But until that occurs, the federal government is seeking other methods of ensuring supply, hence the House legislation.

Manufacturers, however, don’t appear to be feeling a rare earth minerals supply pinch. In May 2012, when the World Trade Organization was pressured to open a case against China for unfair trade practices that tightened rare earth metals supply, The Wall Street Journal reported that much of China’s export quota was going unused due to a drop in worldwide demand.

“Only about half of last year’s 30,184-ton quota was used,” WSJ reported, citing Beijing-based rare-earth consulting firm Baichuan Information. The outlet added that “major rare-earth exports in March this year fell more than 70 percent compared with a year earlier.”

That’s not to say there could not be supply problems if geopolitical winds shift. In 2010 Forbes noted that China enacted a low-key rare-earth metals embargo against the U.S. as part of a tiff over green energy concerns, writing that “the losers include the manufacturers who rely on rare earths. In the U.S., those are primarily makers of catalytic converters, along with the metal-alloying and ceramic-making sectors.”

Manufacturers that depend on rare earth elements thus could potentially be the victims of trade tussles. The national security initiative to stockpile six rare earth minerals could become beneficial at such a time.

But as Gareth Hatch, a rare earth expert and co-founder of Technology Metals Research, told The Financialist in April, “The probability of (supply) disruption is probably fairly low.”

Still, while there are R&D possibilities for rare earth replacements that render the minerals unnecessary in some applications, manufacturers will be monitoring geopolitics and trade issues with an eye toward rare earth metals supply ramifications.

http://news.thomasnet.com/IMT/2013/06/20/are-rare-earth-metals-a-national-security-issue/
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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2013, 05:34:57 PM »

China's Ace in the Hole: Rare Earth Elements

On February 4, 2010, nearly 2 weeks after the Obama administration unveiled a $6.4 billion arms deal with Taiwan, a Chinese article posted on an online Chinese Communist Party–connected daily newspaper site, as well as on many Chinese blogs and military news sources, suggested banning the sale of rare earth elements (REEs) to U.S. companies as retribution.1 There was already ample Western concern about potential diminishing access to supplies of REEs, particularly after a 2009 draft report written by China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology called for a total ban on foreign shipments of terbium, dysprosium, ytterbium, thulium, and lutetium, and a restriction of neodymium, europium, cerium, and lanthanum exports.2 The report immediately caused an uproar among rare earth buyers because China produces approximately 97 percent of the world's REEs. While there are sources of rare earth around the world, it could take anywhere from 10 to 15 years from the time of discovery to begin a full-scale rare earth operation.

REEs are important to hundreds of high-tech applications, including critical military-based technologies such as precisionguided weapons and night-vision goggles. In exploring the idea of global military might, China appears to be holding an unlikely trump card. The country's grasp on the rare earth element industry could one day give China a strong technological advantage and increase its military superiority. This article focuses on rare earth elements and their importance to military technology. It also demonstrates how China's research and development programs, coupled with its vast reserves of REEs, have the potential to make the country a dominant force in the world.

Background

REEs are those chemical elements on the periodic table having atomic numbers 57 through 71 (known as the lanthanides), scandium, and yttrium (atomic numbers 21 and 39). Scandium and yttrium are generally grouped with the lanthanides because of their similar properties and because they are normally found within the same deposits when mined.

The term rare earth is actually a misnomer; these elements are not rare at all, being found in low concentrations throughout the Earth's crust and in higher concentrations in certain minerals. REEs can be found in almost all massive rock formations. However, their concentrations range from ten to a few hundred parts per million by weight. Therefore, finding them where they can be economically mined and processed presents a challenge.

For at least the past five decades, international scientists and engineers have understood the importance of REEs to military technology. For some, the topic of rare earth has even been shrouded in secrecy. For example, in Russia, REEs were once considered a national secret, with little mention being made about them prior to 1993. Their secret applications were long confined to those organizations, such as the Ministry of Medium Machine Building, Ministry of Nuclear Energy, and Ministry of Nonferrous Metallurgy, that were responsible for the research, design, and production of military equipment and weapons systems. The reason for their secrecy was simple. More than 80 percent of the rare earth industry went into the former Soviet Union's defense systems.3

Today, many foreign and domestic analysts view REEs as a key factor in developing modern military technology. For example, one Chinese article attributed "night vision instruments with the REE lanthanum" as a "source of the overwhelming dominance of U.S. military tanks during the Gulf War."4 In China, REEs have been described as a "treasure trove" of new material and the "vitamins of modern industry."5 REEs have also been described as "materials of the future."6

In 1993, Vyacheslav Trubnikov, first deputy director of Russia's Foreign Intelligence Service, reportedly sent a letter about REEs to Oleg Soskovets, the Russian Federation's first vice premier, saying, "We have been receiving information indicating that advanced industrial countries are making increasing use of REEs due to progress in creating and developing qualitatively new, specialized materials with them that increase the critical parameter values of high technology products in the fields of rocket-space and aviation, microelectronics, and electrical engineering."7

Not only are REEs used to greatly improve the qualities and properties in the metallurgy industry, they are also used in the fields of lasers, fluorescents, magnets, fiber optic communications, hydrogen energy storage, and superconducting materials— all key technologies that have been successfully applied to modern militaries.8

Military Applications

Of course, not all REEs are created equal. Some experts predict that by 2015 there will be a shortage of neodymium, terbium, and dysprosium, while supplies of europium, erbium, and yttrium could become tight.9 The neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets are so strong that they are ideal for the miniaturization of a variety of technologies, including possible nanotechnologies. Many solid state lasers use neodymium due to its optimal selection of absorption and emitting wavelengths. Consumption of neodymium is expected to increase significantly as more wind turbines come online. Wind may be "free," but some of the newer generation wind turbines use up to two tons of these magnets. Terbium and dysprosium can be additives to enhance the coercivity in NdFeB magnets.10 Yttrium is used, along with neodymium, in lasers. Europium is the most reactive of the REEs. Along with its current use in phosphors for fluorescent lamps and television/computer screens, it is being studied for possible use in nuclear reactors.11 Erbium is used as an amplifier for fiber optic data transmission. It has also been finding uses in nuclear applications and metallurgy. For example, adding erbium to vanadium, a metal used in nuclear applications and high-speed tools, lowers the hardness and improves the workability of the metal.

Samarium is another REE used in military applications. Samarium is combined with cobalt to create a permanent magnet with the highest resistance to demagnetization of any material known. Because of its ability to withstand higher temperatures without losing its magnetism, it is essential in both aerospace and military applications. Precision-guided munitions use samarium-cobalt (SmCo) permanent magnet motors to direct the flight control surfaces (fins). SmCo can also be used as part of stealth technology in helicopters to create white noise to cancel or hide the sound of the rotor blades. These magnets are used in defense radar systems as well as in several types of electronic countermeasure equipment, such as the Tail Warning Function.12

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, substitutes are available for many rare earth applications, but they are generally less effective. 13 Steven Duclos, chief scientist with General Electric Global Research asserts, "There's no question that rare earths do have some properties that are fairly unique, but for many applications these properties are not so unique that you cannot find similar properties in other materials. [REEs] are just better, from either a weight, strength, or optical property and that's why people have moved to them." Duclos went on to explain, "It always comes down to a tradeoff. You can build a motor that does not have rare earth permanent magnets in it. It will be bigger and heavier for a given amount of power or torque that you want."14

Some scientists argue that in many cases, while there may be substitutes, the tradeoff would diminish military superiority. According to George Hadjipanayis, a Richard B. Murray Chair Professor of Physics at the University of Delaware, the alnico and ferrite magnets, the first two permanent magnets ever produced, do not have rare earth in them and their performance is much lower. Hadjipanayis is currently working with a group of researchers to develop a "next generation magnet" that will be stronger than either the NdFeB or SmCo magnets. The project is being conducted using a three-tiered approach:15

http://www.ndu.edu/press/chinas-ace-in-the-hole.html
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Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2013, 05:36:46 PM »

From 2012:

China's Rare Earth Metals Monopoly Needn't Put An Electronics Stranglehold On America

China presently produces more than 95% of all rare earth materials that are vital in the creation of a big variety of electronic technologies including lithium car batteries, solar panels, wind turbines, flat-screen television, compact fluorescent light bulbs, petroleum-to-gasoline catalytic cracking, and military defense components such as missile guidance systems. It also dominates abilities to process them. This enables it to attract product manufactures to operate there as a condition of doing business, ration exports to maximize prices, and punish nations that don’t go along with its policy interests through supply embargoes. Beijing reduced rare earth shipments by 9% in 2010 over 2009, and has recently announced plans to reduce exports by another 35%.

China produces the vast majority of two particularly important rares, dysprosium (99 percent) and neodymium (95 percent). The motor of a Prius requires about 3 pounds of the latter. While other countries, including the U.S., have significant amounts of these, China’s low-cost labor and lax environmental restrictions has afforded it a big advantage in this mining-intensive industry.

Last year Congress required the Pentagon to examine the use of rare earth materials in defense applications to determine if non-U.S. supplies might be disrupted and identify ways to ensure adequate supplies by 2015. In response, the Pentagon sent back an unpublished report last month titled “Rare Earth Materials in Defense Applications” which concluded that the military is in pretty good general shape except for yttrium, an element used mostly in lasers. While China produced about 98% of the world’s yttrium in 2011, U.S. natural reserves of that material are about half as large.

Is it time to end that Chinese monopoly control of materials important to our military and to high-tech manufacturing?  Following years of unsuccessful efforts, the Obama administration now appears to realize the importance of doing so, announcing on  March 13 that it intends to press the World Trade Organization to force China to discontinue levying restrictions on rare earth exports. While WTO rules technically permit export quotas on natural resources for environmental purposes (which China claims to be the case in regard to rare earths), trade lawyers argue that China’s caps on its export violates that spirit.  They note that while Beijing has been cutting access to these vital materials by other countries through quotas, it has been slow to limit rigid production limits at home that might help to protect the natural environment.

Some other countries are also working to ensure access to rare earths. After China enacted a 2010 embargo on rare earth shipments to Japan for leverage in a territorial dispute, Japan now maintains a stockpile of seven rares and is talking about offering government loans that encourage companies to fund foreign investments private reserves.  The Toyota and Sojitz Corporations have already entered into tie-ins with Vietnamese rare earth claim-holders. Toyota is also operating a small rare earths mine in India.

Elsewhere in the Far East, South Korea announced plans last year to stockpile 76,000 tons of rares over the next five years, about 10% of all global production. The country has allocated a huge $8 billion war chest for this purpose, an amazing sum considering that its economy is one-fifteenth the size of ours.

In Europe, Sweden has declared a Norra Harr heavy rare earth project owned by Tasman Metals, Ltd. to be in its “national interest” under the Swedish Environment Act; and German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently inked an agreement to obtain rare earths from Mongolia.

American companies are on their own in the rare earth race, and some of them, along with taxpayers, may reasonably prefer to keep it that way… so long as government will get out of their way. A 2010 U.S. Geological Survey Report estimates that known reserves of rare oxides are about 1.5 million tons, and total domestic resources might be 13 million tons.  At peak 10,200 2007 U.S. consumption levels, supplies from known reserves would last nearly 150 years, and possibly more than one thousand years if other resources are explored and exploited. In addition, other friendly, stable countries like Australia and Canada have substantial rare earth deposits as well. The Australian mining company Lynas Corporation aims to annually produce 11,000 tons of rare earth oxides from its new Mount Weld mine.

Up until the 1990s, the U.S. dominated world rare earth production, primarily drawing upon the Mountain Pass mine in southern California. The mine was closed in 2002 in response to a combination of environmental restrictions and lower rare earth prices, although processing of previously mined ore from the site has continued. Molycorp Minerals, the current owner, is now reopening it with the goal of producing 20,000 tons of rare earths in the near-term, and 40,000 tons by mid-decade. It claims that a new milling process will enable material production at half of the cost that the Chinese are currently charging. W.R.Grace has announced a deal with Molycorp that could lock up three-quarters of Molycorp’s planned lanthanum production.

Molycorp has recently struck a $1.3 billion deal that paves the way to ship minerals from its California mine to Chinese operations of a Neo Material Technologies arm called Magnequench. General Motors originally sold Magnequench in 1995 to a group of investors that included government-owned China National Non-Ferrous Materials Import and Export.

There’s really no good reason for America to depend on imports for many rare earths that we have right here. While China produces 99% of the world’s dysprosium, a heavy variety used in such applications as computer hard drives, wind turbine generators, cordless tool motors and audio systems, for smart phone manufacture, locations in Idaho, Montana, Colorado, Missouri, Utah and Wyoming are likely to contain heavy rare earth deposits of the yttrium group. Most of these sites, however, are in early exploratory stages of development.  It will require seven to fifteen years before production can even begin after capital is secured.  After that, it is likely to require an additional two to five years more to develop pilot plants capable of refining the ore into pure metals.

Neo Material is one of the leading expert companies for chemistry needed to transform rare earths into specialized magnets. While Molycorp says that the deal creates the most diversified rare earth company outside China, Ed Richardson, president of the U.S. Magnetic Association regards it as worrisome.  He argues that the U.S. is already “dangerously dependent on China” for materials which include those needed in weapons systems, and that Molycorp’s “export of U.S. rare earth assets into China will only exacerbate this problem.”

And there’s an even bigger problem. Assuming that large U.S. deposits of heavy rares exist, developing them on a scale necessary to meet projected demands will require rolling back decades of EPA obstacles in order to make mining and processing cheap enough for American industries to be competitive and profitable.

Some companies in the U.S. and abroad are working to address these issues through development and use of alternate non-rare earth materials. General Electric has recently announced the development of a “super alloy” that could replace rares, but admits that commercialization still has a long way to go. Frank Johnson, a GE materials scientist said “… we’re exploring several hard and soft materials but haven’t selected a special chemistry yet.”

Researchers at DOE’s Ames Laboratory are working to replace rare earth elements in magnets with electrolytic manganese. Not surprisingly, Larry Reaugh, CEO of American Manganese Inc. agrees, commenting that “The rare earth squeeze has made companies go full bore looking for alternatives, and manganese has been found to be one of the more diversified metals out there as an alternative. Researchers are looking to manganese to replace rare earths in magnets, which may be even stronger.”

Other companies are pursuing alternatives as well. NovaTorque, a California startup, has developed electric motors using low-cost ferrite magnets that the company claims outperform those made out of neodymium. Hitachi in Japan is also developing ferrite magnets for use in hybrid cars. Korean scientists are working on computer memories based upon grapheme oxide, a combination of common carbon and oxygen.

So where does all of this ultimately leave America’s electronics future? The good news is that our country is believed to have the world’s second most plentiful deposits of rare earth resources, and that use of alternative materials may eventually reduce demands even for these. On the other hand, a host of current government policies will likely continue to delay development and utilization of those mineral assets, and successful demonstration of alternatives remains theoretical and uncertain.

While as with energy resources we witness a familiar pattern here, perhaps there is a paradoxical new wrinkle. This time the issues directly pit anti-mining and anti-drilling agendas of environmental activists against their own companion goals to advance rare earth-dependent wind turbines, solar power, and more efficient electric vehicles.

Let’s get real, and acknowledge that the Chinese didn’t create our present rare earth challenges. We alone did through increasing dependence upon confused and conflicting government policies. It’s time to end this nonsense, and rediscover tried and true free market principles that will yield lasting solutions.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larrybell/2012/04/15/chinas-rare-earth-metals-monopoly-neednt-put-an-electronics-stranglehold-on-america/2/
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Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2013, 05:40:48 PM »

A new study by the Wyoming State Geological Survey has identified dozens of possible sources of rare earth metals in Wyoming in addition to deposits in the Bear Lodge Mountains that a company has targeted for mining.

More here:
http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/study-ids-possible-new-rare-earths-sources-in-wyoming/article_7b84adc6-d8a9-56d1-b769-080b2d99c412.html

===========

Many of the fastest growing clean energy technologies, from batteries to solar panels to magnets, are made with materials that have unique chemical and physical characteristics, including magnetic, catalytic and luminescent properties. These materials -- which include some rare earth elements and are often called critical materials -- are essential to the clean energy economy and are at risk for supply disruptions. This map shows countries with significant supplies of rare earth elements, and existing mines, deposits, and occurrences of rare earth elements.

http://energy.gov/maps/estimated-rare-earth-reserves-and-deposits

=========

http://mrdata.usgs.gov/mineral-resources/ree.html

=========

Rare earth element
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rare_earth_element

=========

Rare earth prices on the rise

The Chinese government's efforts appear to be paying off with its crackdown on illegal mining of rare earths.

Even as new measures to consolidate the rare earth industry in China are on the cards, prices for the 17 elements have jumped 10% over the past two weeks. The report has indicated that prices of praseodymium-neodymium oxide stood at around $43,000 (270,000 yuan) per tonne on June 25, about $3,237 (20,000 yuan) higher than the price recorded two weeks ago, according to the Shanghai Securities Journal.

Prices of dysprosium oxide and terbium oxide, on the other hand, were quoting at $218,571 (1.35 million yuan) and $420,989 (2.6 million yuan) per tonne respectively on June 25, each higher by $3,237 as compared to a fortnight ago.

The average price of rare earths in 2012 fell close to 40% compared to 2011. To stop the price fall, firms across China adopted strategies such as production suspensions. However, falling demand in downstream sectors and illegal mining curbed the effects of such strategies.

Exports too were hit last year, with China's rare earth exports plummeting 71% given the several international trade suits.

A turnaround in exports was witnessed only in April this year. Chinese exports of rare earth metals were six times higher at 2,196 tonnes, as compared to April 2012.

The government also suspended new prospecting and mining licences for rare earths in a bid to prevent over exploitation. The Asian nation has also been cracking down on the illegal mining of rare earth metals, which could have led to the recent jump in prices.

Local news agencies said illegal mining operations have been rampant at the village of Xianghu, located in the southeastern mountains of the Fujian Province.

Rampant mining has laid the mountainside bare in Xinfeng county of Shaoguan city in the Guangdong province, which is known as the capital of `underground' rare earths.

The crackdown by the government has ensured more whistle-blowers come to the fore. Informants of illegal mining activities are paid $485.924 (3,000 yuan).

Reports indicate that till March 2013, authorities closed 23 illegal mines and 57 processing ponds. Some nine rare earth mines operating illegally in Longchuan county were also shut down over the last six months.
http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/content/en/mineweb-industrial-metals-minerals-old?oid=195948&sn=Detail
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May be what happened to the other libs as well.

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Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2013, 05:46:57 PM »

Honda to reuse rare earth metal recycled from hybrid vehicle batteries

Honda Motors announced Wednesday that it would, along with TDK Corporation and Japan Metals & Chemicals Co. (JMC) jointly pursue the reuse of a rare earth metal extracted from nickel-metal hydride batteries in hybrid vehicles for magnets of new hybrid vehicle motors.

In March Honda began supplying a battery manufacturer with rare earth metals extracted from used nickel-metal hydride batteries at a JMC plant for reuse in new nickel-metal hydride batteries of hybrid vehicles.

“Now, Honda will expand the reuse of extracted rare earth metals to motors for hybrid vehicles to achieve the further recycling of this limited and precious resource,” the company said in a news release. The three companies will begin in-depth discussions toward the reuse in motors and will begin using the process as soon as an adequate supply of used nickel-metal hydride batteries is secured.

Honda’s process for reusing extracted rare earth metal in motors includes disassembling and scrapping, calcination, pulverization/sorting, acid dissolution which produces an oxide containing rare earth metals, followed by molten salt electrolysis--all taking place at Japan Metals & Chemicals Co.  The rare earth metal produced will then be shipped to TDK Corporation for use in magnets in motors for new hybrid vehicles, which will then be placed in Honda products.
http://www.mineweb.com/mineweb/content/en/mineweb-industrial-metals-minerals-old?oid=194693&sn=Detail
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May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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Re: Science & Technology
« Reply #44 on: July 01, 2013, 10:44:02 AM »

Tesla to offer quick electric car battery swaps

A fresh battery can be installed in as little as 90 seconds at a price equal to a tank of gas

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/2013/06/21/tesla-elon-musk-electric-cars-model-s/2444923/

=======

Watch: Tesla Shows Off 90-Second Battery Swapping

http://mashable.com/2013/06/21/tesla-battery-swapping/
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No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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