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Monique

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Home Remedies
« on: December 22, 2012, 11:34:08 PM »

I've been looking at the best healing herbs to grow in a garden (see what that seed catalog has done?) and came across an article about garlic and onions as a great cureall. This one sounds pretty potent! I think I'll make it just to see how it tastes and whether it works.

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Make a soup with six onions, an entire bulb of garlic, about an inch of grated fresh ginger and cayenne pepper to chase away colds and flu, advises health journalist Hazel Courteney, author of the book "500 Health Tips - An A-A of Alternative Health Hints to Help More Than 200 conditions."

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/483598-does-garlic-onions-kill-the-flu-cold-viruses/

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Have any favorite cold & flu (or other) home remedies?
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The Fuzz

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2012, 02:58:19 AM »

No, well, other than sex being one of the best preventative measures for most ailments.
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BigRedDog

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2012, 08:35:41 AM »

This is more along the line of a question but the topic reminded me and it is 'on topic'!

My mother grew up in south Georgia.  When we were young she mentioned more than once about a cold cure/remedy she had to endure. 

They would take a small lump of a very smelly substance and hang it in a little bag and then on a string or chain around the child's neck.  The body heat would warm it and it was extremely 'aromatic' to say the least...   in my Mom's words "it stunk"!!!

I know we've got a few southern by birth gals on here and I know another that spent a few years down there so perhaps they've heard of this and know what the substance was.  We did go to visit an aunt of mine in central Alabama one summer and she had some of it and I sure would not have wanted to walk around school wearing it...  talk about some potential for bullying :o :o :o
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The Fuzz

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2012, 09:18:07 AM »

Bet it was a Sulfa drug BRD.  They do stink, and commonly used in the great South.
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Mayonnaise

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2012, 09:20:36 AM »

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Skittelroo

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2012, 09:21:20 AM »

http://kykinfolk.com/hopkins/lore/cures.html

Perhaps you can find your remedy here.  Most of them are the kind that will make you say uuugh!  Some of the ingredients for what ails you can be turpentine, coal oil, lard, garlic, and more!
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Skittelroo

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2012, 09:27:41 AM »

Ozarkers took many other preventive measures as well. “When I was little,” one University of Arkansas student reported in 1955, “my mother never let me get through a winter without a ‘coal oil rag’ on my chest. She mixed a little hog lard, turpentine, coal oil, and camphor on a piece of Daddy’s woolen underwear and pinned it next to my skin. She always got it good and hot ‘so as to open the pores good.’ When my two sisters came along, Mom added Vicks salve.” [16] Coal oil rags were also known as “Sally rags,” which many children wore during the Ozark winters. Sally rags did, indeed, help keep the children warm, and their fumes helped keep nasal passages clear, so bacteria would not find a welcoming environment. In addition, Ozark mothers frequently required their school-age children to wear, hung around their necks, a bag containing the odoriferous asafetida (the name is derived from the Latin foetida, meaning smelly). One man quipped that if “asfidity” did work to ward off germs, it was probably because “a cold germ might well back down when faced with the odor.” [17] Perhaps by making sure their own children smelled bad, mothers prevented other children with runny noses and dirty hands from getting close enough to pass along an infection.

http://beckerexhibits.wustl.edu/mowihsp/articles/Ozarks.htm
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BigRedDog

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2012, 09:50:20 AM »

I remember this was asked/discussed before. I finally found them.

http://monroetalks.com/forum/index.php?topic=437.msg8140#msg8140

http://monroetalks.com/forum/index.php?topic=21821.msg496118#msg496118


I thought we had done this before...  didn't remember it was twice though!

and I did find my prior post where I found what it was I was thinking of...

Bet it was a Sulfa drug BRD.  They do stink, and commonly used in the great South.


I remember the smell and I'm sure you're right...

http://www.herbcompanion.com/health/Slave-medicine.aspx?page=3
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BigRedDog

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2012, 10:52:48 AM »

I've been looking at the best healing herbs to grow in a garden (see what that seed catalog has done?) and came across an article about garlic and onions as a great cureall. This one sounds pretty potent! I think I'll make it just to see how it tastes and whether it works.



From the attached article on asafetida:

Quote
"Eat no onions or garlic, for we are to utter sweet breath,” a Shakespearean character entreats actors in the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Alliums are aromatics, eaten precisely for their smelly qualities. But what if you’re forbidden onions and garlic for life?


http://www.culinate.com/articles/produce_diaries/asafetida

Bet it was a Sulfa drug BRD.  They do stink, and commonly used in the great South.


Turns out it's a spice!!!

Ozarkers took many other preventive measures as well. “When I was little,” one University of Arkansas student reported in 1955, “my mother never let me get through a winter without a ‘coal oil rag’ on my chest. She mixed a little hog lard, turpentine, coal oil, and camphor on a piece of Daddy’s woolen underwear and pinned it next to my skin. She always got it good and hot ‘so as to open the pores good.’ When my two sisters came along, Mom added Vicks salve.” [16] Coal oil rags were also known as “Sally rags,” which many children wore during the Ozark winters. Sally rags did, indeed, help keep the children warm, and their fumes helped keep nasal passages clear, so bacteria would not find a welcoming environment. In addition, Ozark mothers frequently required their school-age children to wear, hung around their necks, a bag containing the odoriferous asafetida (the name is derived from the Latin foetida, meaning smelly). One man quipped that if “asfidity” did work to ward off germs, it was probably because “a cold germ might well back down when faced with the odor.” [17] Perhaps by making sure their own children smelled bad, mothers prevented other children with runny noses and dirty hands from getting close enough to pass along an infection.

http://beckerexhibits.wustl.edu/mowihsp/articles/Ozarks.htm



Thanks Skittelroo...   your article got me to digging more and found the link above!!!
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Skittelroo

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2012, 11:33:24 AM »

From the attached article on asafetida:

http://www.culinate.com/articles/produce_diaries/asafetida

Turns out it's a spice!!!

Thanks Skittelroo...   your article got me to digging more and found the link above!!!


Glad I finally was a help!  Actually, I have found many strange remedies since the smelly topic was brought up.  Only a few can I say I had heard before.  Sulpha?  No wonder everyone stayed away! 
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The Fuzz

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2012, 11:38:04 AM »

Sulfa drugs and salves were popular in the South when I was a kid.  Generally derived from the high-sulfur coal content of the area.
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BigRedDog

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2012, 11:49:56 AM »

Sulfa drugs and salves were popular in the South when I was a kid.  Generally derived from the high-sulfur coal content of the area.

And the stuff in the bag was almost black and in a paste form which is what made me think along the line of a mineral derivative...   

and it was a long, long, long time ago...  maybe I have my smelly products confused :o :o :o
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The Fuzz

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2012, 12:32:55 PM »

That stuff in the bag was also used for "Drawing" salve.......pull the infection out of wounds or boils. 

First time I ever saw it was something that stuck in my mind at an early age......my Father took me way out in the boonies to see his full-blooded (could have been mixed...IDK) American Indian great grandmother. (yea, I know.....Indian and Irish blood here - go figure) 

I remember seeing her mixing it.....and all the holes in the roof that required pots and pans that afternoon when the rain started.
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Monique

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2012, 09:04:30 PM »

My oldest is sounding croaky and has a mild sore throat. Just gave her a teaspoon of honey with 1/4 tsp. cinnamon. This combination is supposed to have antibacterial and antiviral properties. Plus, she didn't mind taking it. Kids can also take it as an apple dip, which sounds fairly yummy.

I just hope it works. I don't want anyone sick for Christmas!
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Mayonnaise

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Re: Home Remedies
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2012, 09:36:53 PM »

My oldest is sounding croaky and has a mild sore throat. Just gave her a teaspoon of honey with 1/4 tsp. cinnamon. This combination is supposed to have antibacterial and antiviral properties. Plus, she didn't mind taking it. Kids can also take it as an apple dip, which sounds fairly yummy.

I just hope it works. I don't want anyone sick for Christmas!
My grandmother used to put Vick's vapor rub on my chest when I went to bed. Breathing in that stuff seemed to work.
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