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Frenchfry

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #135 on: June 27, 2013, 01:30:27 AM »

McLaughlin: "Just Think What This Country Would Be Like If You Had One Major Attack Every Month!"
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excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #136 on: June 30, 2013, 05:52:46 PM »


More information coming out...

NSA Leak Vindicates AT&T Whistleblower

more at:  http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/06/nsa-whistleblower-klein/

Today’s revelations that the National Security Agency collected bulk data on the email traffic of millions of Americans provides startling evidence for the first time to support a whistleblower’s longstanding claims that AT&T was forwarding global internet traffic to the government from secret rooms inside its offices.

The collection program, which lasted from 2001 to 2011, involved email metadata — the “enveloped” information for email that reveals the sender’s address and recipient, as well as IP addresses and websites visited, the Guardian newspaper reported today.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

Frenchfry

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #137 on: June 30, 2013, 06:03:14 PM »

More information coming out...

NSA Leak Vindicates AT&T Whistleblower

more at:  http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/06/nsa-whistleblower-klein/

Today’s revelations that the National Security Agency collected bulk data on the email traffic of millions of Americans provides startling evidence for the first time to support a whistleblower’s longstanding claims that AT&T was forwarding global internet traffic to the government from secret rooms inside its offices.

The collection program, which lasted from 2001 to 2011, involved email metadata — the “enveloped” information for email that reveals the sender’s address and recipient, as well as IP addresses and websites visited, the Guardian newspaper reported today.
LOL...not sure who the retired AT&T tech vindicated.

No matter, Congress approved and I approve.
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excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #138 on: June 30, 2013, 06:33:13 PM »

LOL...not sure who the retired AT&T tech vindicated.

No matter, Congress approved and I approve.


The author of the Patriot Act states that congress did not approve the current behavior of NSA.


Author Of The Patriot Act Says NSA Surveillance Is An Abuse And Must End

more at:  http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20130610/01385123392/author-patriot-act-says-nsa-surveillance-is-abuse-must-end.shtml

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, who was the chair of the House Judiciary Committee when it put forth the Patriot Act, and someone who's not known for being afraid to support expanded surveillance, has now come out strongly against the NSA's surveillance efforts, saying that they must end. He claims that he pushed back against the suggestions of the federal government when the Patriot Act was first proposed, to make sure that it wouldn't take away our liberty. But he's concerned about what's become of the law that he brought forth. He insists that the law was never intended to approve the kind of spying and data collection done by the NSA, and the President's belief that these efforts were authorized by Congress is false:

In his press conference on Friday, President Obama described the massive collection of phone and digital records as "two programs that were originally authorized by Congress, have been repeatedly authorized by Congress". But Congress has never specifically authorized these programs, and the Patriot Act was never intended to allow the daily spying the Obama administration is conducting.

To obtain a business records order like the one the administration obtained, the Patriot Act requires the government to prove to a special federal court, known as a Fisa court, that it is complying with specific guidelines set by the attorney general and that the information sought is relevant to an authorized investigation. Intentionally targeting US citizens is prohibited.

Technically, the administration's actions were lawful insofar as they were done pursuant to an order from the Fisa court. But based on the scope of the released order, both the administration and the Fisa court are relying on an unbounded interpretation of the act that Congress never intended.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 06:38:11 PM by excelsior »
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

Frenchfry

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #139 on: June 30, 2013, 10:05:35 PM »

The author of the Patriot Act states that congress did not approve the current behavior of NSA.
I'd say Republican Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner is playing the right-wing partisanship game rather than accepting his role in crafting that legislation.
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excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #140 on: July 01, 2013, 11:29:44 AM »

German's data privacy regulations are among the strictest in the world. Organizations cannot collect any personally identifiable information (PII) without express permission from the individual.

Benjamin Franklin stated that "those who would give up essential liberty, to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."  It appears that some folks would call Ben un-American today.

It is a sad day when Germans love liberty more than Americans.


Germans Loved Obama. Now We Don’t Trust Him.

more at:  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/30/opinion/sunday/germans-loved-obama-now-we-dont-trust-him.html?hp&_r=0

BERLIN — IN May 2010, I received a brown envelope. In it was a CD with an encrypted file containing six months of my life. Six months of metadata, stored by my cellphone provider, T-Mobile. This list of metadata contained 35,830 records. That’s 35,830 times my phone company knew if, where and when I was surfing the Web, calling or texting.

The truth is that phone companies have this data on every customer. I got mine because, in 2009, I filed a suit against T-Mobile for the release of all the data on me that had been gathered and stored. The reason this information had been preserved for six months was because of Germany’s implementation of a 2006 European Union directive.

All of this data had to be kept so that law enforcement agencies could gain access to it. That meant that the metadata of 80 million Germans was being stored, without any concrete suspicions and without cause.

This “preventive measure” was met with huge opposition in Germany. Lawyers, journalists, doctors, unions and civil liberties activists started to protest. In 2008, almost 35,000 people signed on to a constitutional challenge to the law. In Berlin, tens of thousands of people took to the streets to protest data retention. In the end, the Constitutional Court ruled that the implementation of the European Union directive was, in fact, unconstitutional.

In Germany, whenever the government begins to infringe on individual freedom, society stands up. Given our history, we Germans are not willing to trade in our liberty for potentially better security. Germans have experienced firsthand what happens when the government knows too much about someone. In the past 80 years, Germans have felt the betrayal of neighbors who informed for the Gestapo and the fear that best friends might be potential informants for the Stasi. Homes were tapped. Millions were monitored.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #141 on: July 01, 2013, 03:20:15 PM »

It appears that the U.S government has build a secure network.

Anonymous Jihad

more at:  http://freebeacon.com/anonymous-jihad/

Jihadists are seeking out more secure methods of online communications, including an avenue created by the U.S. government and financed by American taxpayers, in the wake of revelations about the U.S. monitoring of online messages.

The Tor network has become a go-to means for jihadists and criminals to communicate, raise money, and buy and sell illicit goods and services without fear of being identified or traced by intelligence or law enforcement officials.

The network uses technology called “onion routing” (Tor is an acronym for The Onion Router), which refers to layers of encryption that prevent governments or other users from obtaining information about users or websites hosted on the network.

Tor uses volunteers’ computers to route traffic through thousands of “nodes” worldwide, obscuring users’ locations and the sources of data hosted on the network. The technology makes it nearly impossible to trace or identify the network’s roughly 500,000 daily users.

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory created Tor in the 1990s. The network was used as a means to circumvent regimes that censor or block their citizens’ online communications. It is a useful tool for whistleblowers and dissidents who risk retribution by repressive governments.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #142 on: July 01, 2013, 05:22:43 PM »

So they have 500k suspects,   that should help limit the scope of the investigations - instead of wasting all the time and effort as to what porn is being downloaded on what phone... 
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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #143 on: July 01, 2013, 09:53:54 PM »


NSA's new Utah Data Center will take surveillance to a new level.   The new supercomputer is capable of 100 petaflops.


Leaks shed light on how NSA may use supercomputers, gigantic hard drives.

Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/technology/ci_23572448/leaks-shed-light-how-nsa-may-use-supercomputers

The NSA will use the Cray XC30 series of high-capacity computers to crunch at least some of its data, according to documents from several of the agency's private contractors. It's unclear, though, if they will be deployed at Bluffdale or elsewhere on the NSA's network, possible at computing centers at Fort Meade.

Under a program nicknamed "Cascade," the Department of Defense has helped finance development of the XC30 series, which industry officials say can run up to 1 million Intel Xenon core processors simultaneously, enabling speeds of up to 100 petaflops. One petaflop is about one thousand trillion calculations per second.

If true, the Cray XC30 would be three times faster than China's Tianhe-2, or Milky Way-2, recently heralded as the world's fastest computer.

According to sociobiologist E.O. Wilson and others, that kind of brute-force computing power could conceivably simulate the behavior of every active molecule in complex human cell mechanics. Or every cell in a human body. Or track the movements of every human on Earth, in real time.

It also could make short work of breaking advanced encryption methods, according to former NSA mathematician-turned-whistleblower William Binney.

The NSA will feed such "petacrunchers" an even more astonishing collection of data. The magnitude of the agency's data storage reserves at Bluffdale all but defy comprehension. And it appears even that capacity will meet only part of the NSA's needs.

Some, including author and NSA watchdog James Bamford, estimate Bluffdale's storage in thousands of zettabytes, or yottabytes — or one thousand trillion gigabytes of data. By comparison, the U.S. computer network hardware maker Cisco projects that by 2016, the total volume of data moved globally by Internet protocol, or IP, will be 1.3 zettabytes, or the equivalent of 1.3 trillion gigabytes.
One example of military-generated data puts that into perspective.

Five years ago, an internal DoD report highlighted the need for "very large scale data storage, delivery and transmission technology," to index and store streaming video from an expanding swarm of unmanned surveillance vehicles, known as drones, "and other sensor networks." The report estimated the U.S. military's network-wide storage requirements as "exceeding exabytes and possibly yottabytes."

Since then, use of airborne surveillance drones has surged around the globe.

Exact numbers on how much imagery, Internet traffic and other data the NSA is preparing to store at Bluffdale is, not surprisingly, a fiercely guarded secret. In interviews, NSA officials would only say they built the center's capacity with an eye on Moore's law, the notion that computing power — and the data it yields — doubles every 12 to 18 months.



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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #144 on: July 03, 2013, 11:59:14 AM »

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has apologized for lying to the U.S. Congress so I guess we are good now.

Intelligence chief Clapper apologizes for ‘erroneous’ statement to Congress

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/defcon-hill/policy-and-strategy/308979-clapper-apologies-for-erroneous-statement-to-congress-on-us-data-collection

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has apologized for a “clearly erroneous” statement he made to Congress over the National Security Agency’s surveillance activities.

In a letter to Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), released publicly on Tuesday, Clapper said he was mistaken when he told Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that the United States did not collect data on millions of Americans.

“My response was clearly erroneous — for which I apologize,” Clapper wrote in the letter dated June 21.


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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

blue2

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #145 on: July 03, 2013, 04:00:08 PM »

no such thing as perjury any in obamas gang.  Just apologize if you you get caught.
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Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #146 on: July 04, 2013, 12:06:22 AM »

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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #147 on: July 09, 2013, 08:02:59 AM »

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act) established the CFPB.  It appears President Obama has them tracking our private financial information.

JW Obtains Records Detailing Obama Administration’s Warrantless Collection of Citizens’ Personal Financial Data

http://www.judicialwatch.org/press-room/press-releases/jw-obtains-records-detailing-obama-administrations-warrantless-collection-of-citizens-personal-financial-data/

(Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch announced today that it has obtained records from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) revealing that the agency has spent millions of dollars for the warrantless collection and analysis of Americans’ financial transactions. The documents also reveal that CFPB contractors may be required to share the information with “additional government entities.”

The records were obtained pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request filed on April 24, 2013, following the April 23 Senate Banking Committee testimony of CFPB Director Richard Cordray. The documents uncovered by Judicial Watch include:

Overlapping contracts with multiple credit reporting agencies and accounting firms to gather, store, and share credit card data as shown in the task list of a contract with Argus Information & Advisory Services LLC worth $2.9 million
Deloitte Consulting: solicitation issue date 11/30/2011, award effective date 05/29/2012;
Deloitte Consulting: solicitation issue date 11/30/2011, award effective date 05/29/2012;
Argus: solicitation issue date 02/14/2012, award effective date 03/15/2012;
Experian: solicitation issue date 07/03/2012, award effective date 09/24/2012
An “indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity” contract with Experian worth up to $8,426,650 to track daily consumer habits of select individuals without their awareness or consent
$4,951,333 for software and instruction paid to Deloitte Consulting LLP
A provision stipulating that “The contractor recognizes that, in performing this requirement, the Contractor may obtain access to non-public, confidential information, Personally Identifiable Information (PII), or proprietary information.”
A stipulation that “The Contractor may be required to share credit card data collected from the Banks with additional government entities as directed by the Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR).”
The full extent of the CFPB personal financial data collection program is revealed in a document obtained by Judicial Watch entitled “INDEFINITE-DELIVERY INDEFINITE-QUANTITY (IDIQ) STATEMENT OF WORK.”  Issued by CFPB Contracting Officer Xiaoling Ang on July 3, 2012, the IDIQ document’s stated objective: “The CFPB seeks to acquire and maintain a nationally representative panel of credit information on consumers for use in a wide range of policy research projects… The panel shall be a random sample of consumer credit files obtains from a national database of credit files.”

To accomplish this objective, the CFPB describes the scope of the program accordingly:

The panel shall include 5 million consumers, and joint borrowers, co-signers, and authorized users [emphasis added]. The initial panel shall contain 10 years of historical data on a quarterly basis [emphasis added]. The initial sample shall be drawn from current records and historical data appended for that sample as well as additional samples during the intervening years [emphasis added] to make the combines sample representative at each point in time.

The CFPB data collection program has been highly controversial since the April 2013 hearing, when Cordray disclosed elements of the venture at a Senate Banking Committee hearing. At the time, the US Chamber of Commerce accused the CFPB of breaking the law by demanding the account-level data without a warrant or National Security Letter.

“The Obama administration’s warrantless collection of the private financial information of millions of Americans is mind-blowing.  Is there anything that this administration thinks it can’t do?” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “These documents show that the Consumer Financial Protection Board is an out-of-control government agency that threatens the fundamental privacy and financial security of Americans. This is every bit as serious as the controversy over the NSA’s activities.”
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #148 on: July 11, 2013, 10:20:59 PM »


Microsoft, Google and Apple in bed with the NSA.   It appears my next system may be running Linux.

Revealed: how Microsoft handed the NSA access to encrypted messages

more at:  http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/11/microsoft-nsa-collaboration-user-data

Microsoft has collaborated closely with US intelligence services to allow users' communications to be intercepted, including helping the National Security Agency to circumvent the company's own encryption, according to top-secret documents obtained by the Guardian.

The files provided by Edward Snowden illustrate the scale of co-operation between Silicon Valley and the intelligence agencies over the last three years. They also shed new light on the workings of the top-secret Prism program, which was disclosed by the Guardian and the Washington Post last month.

The documents show that:

• Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;

• The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;

• The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;

• Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;

• In July last year, nine months after Microsoft bought Skype, the NSA boasted that a new capability had tripled the amount of Skype video calls being collected through Prism;

• Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport".

The latest NSA revelations further expose the tensions between Silicon Valley and the Obama administration. All the major tech firms are lobbying the government to allow them to disclose more fully the extent and nature of their co-operation with the NSA to meet their customers' privacy concerns. Privately, tech executives are at pains to distance themselves from claims of collaboration and teamwork given by the NSA documents, and insist the process is driven by legal compulsion.

In a statement, Microsoft said: "When we upgrade or update products we aren't absolved from the need to comply with existing or future lawful demands." The company reiterated its argument that it provides customer data "only in response to government demands and we only ever comply with orders for requests about specific accounts or identifiers".

In June, the Guardian revealed that the NSA claimed to have "direct access" through the Prism program to the systems of many major internet companies, including Microsoft, Skype, Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises

excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #149 on: July 18, 2013, 10:32:11 PM »

Did the NSA finally tell the truth or did they provide the 'least untruthful' answer once again?

NSA’s phone and web snooping more far-reaching than thought

more at:  http://www.cnbc.com/id/100894940

The US's National Security Agency, the electronic eavesdropping body, has disclosed that its telephone and internet data collection is far greater than previously known in the face of unusually sharp congressional questioning.

The disclosures, and the more aggressive stance from members of the House judiciary committee, underlined how the NSA is losing support in a Congress which had initially largely backed the White House's defense of anti-terror surveillance.

John Inglis, a deputy director of the agency, told a congressional panel that the NSA collected the data of not only people whom suspected foreign terrorists were talking to in the US, as they say they are authorized by law to do.

Mr Inglis, using the NSA's in-house jargon, said the agency could go "two or three hops" beyond, to the person originally contacted by the target, and to people they had contacted, and then one step further.

The NSA has previously said it traces connections with potential terror targets by only two degrees of separation.
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"The beginning of wisdom is a definition of terms." ~ Socrates

"No rational argument will have a rational effect on a man who does not want to adopt a rational attitude." ~ Karl Popper

"What vitiates entirely the socialists economic critique of capitalism is their failure to grasp the sovereignty of the consumers in the market economy." ~ Ludwig von Mises
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