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Frenchfry

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #105 on: June 30, 2013, 10:05:35 PM »

The author of the Patriot Act states that congress did not approve the current behavior of NSA.
I'd say Republican Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner is playing the right-wing partisanship game rather than accepting his role in crafting that legislation.
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #106 on: July 01, 2013, 05:22:43 PM »

So they have 500k suspects,   that should help limit the scope of the investigations - instead of wasting all the time and effort as to what porn is being downloaded on what phone... 
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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

blue2

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #107 on: July 03, 2013, 04:00:08 PM »

no such thing as perjury any in obamas gang.  Just apologize if you you get caught.
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Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #108 on: July 04, 2013, 12:06:22 AM »

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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

BigRedDog

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #109 on: July 19, 2013, 09:05:47 AM »

a brand new NJ Supreme Court ruling on police and tracking cell phones:

http://www.toledoblade.com/Nation/2013/07/19/NJ-court-Warrants-needed-for-cellphone-tracking.html
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The Fuzz

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #110 on: July 21, 2013, 01:36:53 PM »

http://news.yahoo.com/tipping-point-war-leaks-154027906.html

Humm, let's see?  Put resources on what happened 2 elections ago, or put them with the others on how to fix the problem?  Looks like the answer is to look who to blame versus fix the issue....not surprised I guess. 

Bush was an idiot and most know it, but is it an excuse to take an existing operating pattern and continue and strengthen it?

Quote
he United States government has faced criticism for its aggressive war against classified information leaks from within its normally well-secured walls. But there was a tipping point, just after Obama took office, when the administration decided something must be done about leaks.

RELATED: Obama Has His Eye on 2012

The New York Times' Sharon LaFranierre did a thorough report on the origins of the administration's crackdown on national security leakers. The answer lies somewhere in a combination of new faces running national security and a series of embarrassing leaks that happened immediately after the Obama administration was installed. It was a perfect storm that led to this war on leaks we've heard so much about.

RELATED: Doctor Says Obama Still Not Smoking

Under Obama's former director of national intelligence, Dennis C. Blair, the war against leaks started just after the new President took office. It became very clear, very early that they had a leaking problem on their hands.

    According to Mr. Blair, the effort got under way after Fox News reported in June 2009 that American intelligence had gleaned word from within North Korea of plans for an imminent nuclear test — a disclosure that eventually led to the indictment of Mr. Kim. The report infuriated the Central Intelligence Agency not only because it indicated that the United States was privy to the private discussions of North Korean leaders, but also because it was broadcast mere hours after a classified report with that information had been distributed to intelligence officials.

The immediate leaking of such important intel combined with the new faces running national security pushed an aggressive assault on leaks to the forefront. The way the government was looking at leaks had already started to change. During Blair's first few months in office, he ordered a review of the cases brought against government officials for leaking national security threats during George Bush's second term. There were 153 cases and no indictments. Some cases had suspects that were never charged. A fraction of the cases were turned into FBI investigations.  "He was dismayed by what he found," the Times reports.

RELATED: Going 'Forward' Isn't as Easy as It Seems

And that's when things started to change within the administration. "A tipping point was reached in 2009," one source told the Times. Blair, FBI director Robert Mueller and Attorney General Eric Holder were being scolded in private meetings with Senate leaders, like Sen. Dianne Feinstein, for the continued torrent of leaks. "We had to do 50 push-ups and promise to do better," Blair told LaFranierre. Blair's response was to put his right-hand man, Robert M. Bryant, his counterintelligence executive, in charge of stopping leaks. They also trimmed the investigation review period from a few months down to three weeks. Whether or not their efforts are producing results, beyond twice as many prosecutions as all previous administrations combined, is up for some debate.

RELATED: Jay Pharoah Makes His Presidential Debut

On Friday, Times reporter James Risen was ordered to testify against one of his alleged sources. The government believes CIA official Jeffrey Sterling was the person who leaked classified information about a U.S. plan to pass bad information to Iran. The information, which was classified, ended up in a report and subsequent book written by Risen.

RELATED: Obama's Big Bucks to Get Inside Our BRAIN

The Department of Justice is also investigating Marine General James Cartwright for allegedly leaking information about the Stuxnet virus to The New York Times' David Sanger. You also may have heard about the cases against Wikileaks source Bradley Manning and the former National Security Agency contractor, Edward Snowden, who leaked classified documents to the Guardian and Washington Post. A few weeks ago, NSA head Keith Alexander told ABC's This Week that "clearly the system did not work."

The administration is leading an unprecedented war on leaks, to varying degrees of success.
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The Fuzz

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #111 on: August 01, 2013, 06:00:12 PM »

Bet they are amused my some of my searches, especially "bestiality and terrorism porn".
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Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #112 on: August 01, 2013, 09:49:45 PM »

Bet they are amused my some of my searches, especially "bestiality and terrorism porn".

Did you say beast...   ;D



then all you need is to put a tag line in like those web masters all do to get greater hits

Pressure, explosive, Bin, Laden, Iran, Phony, Fast, Furious, Holder, Benghazi, Zimmerman, Snowden, Wikileaks, Secrets, Obamacare, fleece, Assault, Rifles, Area 54, Aliens, Spies, Muslim, Brotherhood, hoodie, skittles, sexting, Weiner, Democrat,
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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

blue2

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #113 on: August 05, 2013, 04:44:22 PM »

This stuff is out of control and we will never reign it back in.  There are too many powerful people because we keep voting for the same ones.  Power corrupts.  If Dingell runs again the same idiots will still vote for him. 
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FScott12345

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #114 on: August 09, 2013, 06:23:24 AM »

The NSA must be stopped at all costs.  Snowden needs to be  allowed to divulge all the information he has and Manning needs to be set free.  What Obama, and the rest of the government is doing, is an atrocity and creating a Big Brother state.  They're violating our 4th amendment rights.  People need to wake up.
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Will Sweat

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #115 on: August 09, 2013, 08:10:44 AM »

The NSA must be stopped at all costs.  Snowden needs to be  allowed to divulge all the information he has and Manning needs to be set free.  What Obama, and the rest of the government is doing, is an atrocity and creating a Big Brother state.  They're violating our 4th amendment rights.  People need to wake up.

I agree with you regarding Mr. Snowden but do not with Pvt. Manning.  Mr. Snowden is a civilian who (so far) has disclosed how information is collected on the public.  Pvt. Manning was a US Army Intelligence Analyst who released classified information regarding Military activities that, IMO, provided aid and comfort to those who wish to do us harm.  Reading his "chats" he understood what he was doing and while he had a right to believe that he was doing it for noble reasons it does not diminish the fact that he committed a crime that placed our volunteer service members at grave risk.
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Will Sweat

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #116 on: August 12, 2013, 10:34:32 AM »

It is amazing that former President Jimmy Carter can make the following statment and that it recieves little to no attention from the national news media. 

Speaking at a closed-door event in Atlanta covered by German newspaper Der Spiegel, Carter also criticized the NSA’s domestic spying as damaging to the core of the nation’s principles. “America does not have a functioning democracy at this point in time,” Carter said

While Carter expresses support (for Mr. Snowden), the Obama Administration continues to push for Snowden’s extradition and attempts to prevent him for benefiting from the universal right of asylum. This while also defending mass surveillance on Americans after administration officials were caught lying to Congress about it.

http://news.firedoglake.com/2013/07/19/president-carter-supports-snowden-says-america-does-not-have-a-functioning-democracy/

http://news.firedoglake.com/2013/06/10/general-clapper-appears-to-have-mislead-congress-and-public-about-nsa-program/

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Monroe Native

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #117 on: August 12, 2013, 12:38:05 PM »

Just another Phony Scandal....  Nothing to see here!
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excelsior

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #118 on: August 12, 2013, 07:59:17 PM »

I can see the NSA driving folks to move their business to off shore companies.

The NSA Is Commandeering the Internet

more at:  http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/08/the-nsa-is-commandeering-the-internet/278572/



It turns out that the NSA's domestic and world-wide surveillance apparatus is even more extensive than we thought. Bluntly: The government has commandeered the Internet. Most of the largest Internet companies provide information to the NSA, betraying their users. Some, as we've learned, fight and lose. Others cooperate, either out of patriotism or because they believe it's easier that way.

I have one message to the executives of those companies: fight.

Do you remember those old spy movies, when the higher ups in government decide that the mission is more important than the spy's life? It's going to be the same way with you. You might think that your friendly relationship with the government means that they're going to protect you, but they won't. The NSA doesn't care about you or your customers, and will burn you the moment it's convenient to do so.

We're already starting to see that. Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and others are pleading with the government to allow them to explain details of what information they provided in response to National Security Letters and other government demands. They've lost the trust of their customers, and explaining what they do -- and don't do -- is how to get it back. The government has refused; they don't care.

It will be the same with you. There are lots more high-tech companies who have cooperated with the government. Most of those company names are somewhere in the thousands of documents that Edward Snowden took with him, and sooner or later they'll be released to the public. The NSA probably told you that your cooperation would forever remain secret, but they're sloppy. They'll put your company name on presentations delivered to thousands of people: government employees, contractors, probably even foreign nationals. If Snowden doesn't have a copy, the next whistleblower will.

This is why you have to fight. When it becomes public that the NSA has been hoovering up all of your users' communications and personal files, what's going to save you in the eyes of those users is whether or not you fought. Fighting will cost you money in the short term, but capitulating will cost you more in the long term.

Already companies are taking their data and communications out of the US.
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Professor H

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Re: Federal government surveillance of Americans
« Reply #119 on: August 22, 2013, 01:40:46 PM »

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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi
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