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Monroe Native

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #105 on: May 08, 2014, 07:52:49 AM »

I highly recommend it......I penned it a few years ago.


How about this one too!

 ;)

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SidecarFlip

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #106 on: May 08, 2014, 08:19:44 AM »

Thats more like how to subvert to your employee's wishes but in the end, terminate them anyway...  just do it sublimely (so they think they have the upper hand when in fact you always did).
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livewire

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #107 on: May 08, 2014, 10:54:47 PM »

You DEFINITELY need to read this book.




Why?

You OBVIOUSLY read it, since you have it in your collection, and it OBVIOUSLY didn't work for you!
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CatLady

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #108 on: May 09, 2014, 07:07:05 PM »

Per the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD).

Q: Are bees included in the Siting GAAMP?

A: No. Bees are not considered livestock and are not included in the Site Selection & Odor Control for New/Expanding Livestock Facilities GAAMP. However, bees are included in the Care of Farm Animals GAAMP.
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Monroe Native

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #109 on: May 09, 2014, 07:08:48 PM »

I thought bees were an insect....

Only a government agent would classify them as an animal.
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I have learned that only two things are necessary to keep one's wife happy. First, let her think she's having her own way. And second, let her have it.
Lyndon B. Johnson

You do not examine legislation in the light of the benefits it will convey if properly administered, but in the light of the wrongs it would do and the harms it would cause if improperly administered.
Lyndon B. Johnson

Professor H

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #110 on: May 16, 2014, 08:49:44 AM »


Here is the Farm Bureau "response" to the issue:

MFB Statement Regarding Changes to Right to Farm GAAMPs


May 5, 2014


Michigan Farm Bureau - logo full size - stackedContact: Matt Kapp, 517-679-5338

Recent changes to some of the farming guidelines that underpin Michigan's Right to Farm law have created a whirlwind of confusion and misunderstanding about that law, including what it does and doesn't do, who it does and doesn't pertain to, and what it does and doesn't protect. That confusion and misunderstanding has been amplified by some media reports that have grossly misrepresented the changes' potential effects-particularly for small and urban farmers.

Amplified by the haste of social media and skewed by alarmist comments from groups whose opposition to conventional agricultural practices is a matter of record, some of these misrepresentations have incorrectly painted Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) as being against urban agriculture-against small farms and farmers.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

MFB represents the interests of its members, regardless of their farm's size and regardless of the commodities they raise. Ours is a grass-roots, membership-driven organization-an association of farmers. It is those farmer members who develop the organization's policy, which accordingly reflects their interests.

That policy has long supported Michigan's Right to Farm Act, and at our 2013 annual meeting, held last December in Grand Rapids, our members approved the following policy, solemnizing our organization's clear support for urban farming and upholding the integrity of Right to Farm:



"We support economic development that accepts agricultural businesses as part of urban center economies and development of agreements which allow urban agricultural production while protecting the rights of farm businesses with production sites within Michigan cities.

"We support the development of a separate set of management practices unique to new and expanding urban agriculture, which also include provisions for local zoning requirements, livestock care standards, crops and cropping standards, and environmental protection standards.

"Right to Farm protections for commercial agricultural practices must not be compromised."

Right to Farm doesn't mean blanket protection for anyone raising crops and/or livestock, regardless of their location or the size of their operation-it never has. It was originally designed to protect traditional (rural, commercial) farmers from nuisance lawsuits, provided the farm conforms with Generally Accepted Agricultural Management Practices (GAAMPs). It was inspired by the tendency of rural newcomers to find they didn't care for the sights, smells, sounds and dirt that invariably comes along with traditional, rural agriculture. Urban farming reverses that original premise; now it's the urban farmer who is introducing a potential nuisance to an existing, residential setting.

The recent changes to these guidelines don't equate to anyone "losing" protection under the Right to Farm Act. Headlines like "Michigan Loses 'Right to Farm'" and "Michigan Bans Animals on Small Farms" are inaccurate and misleading, inflammatory and alarmist.

It's important to remember that the siting GAAMP was originally designed to protect the rights of farmers and local property owners who would question the wisdom of building, for example, a large livestock facility next to a shopping mall or apartment complex. Common sense would suggest that's not prudent, and that same common sense should apply in this discussion.

GAAMP conformance is voluntary, not mandatory, but necessary for Right to Farm protection; farmers choosing not to abide by GAAMPs knowingly sacrifice that protection.

The Michigan Agriculture Commission (which is responsible for keeping GAAMPs current) is now considering the creation of a work group to draft a new set of guidelines to specifically address the concerns and issues unique to urban farming. Michigan Farm Bureau supports the development of guidelines specific to urban agriculture and hopes to be at that table, helping and sharing its expertise in a manner that supports and fosters the growth, development, success and prosperity of small and urban farms.

https://www.michfb.com/MI/News/Press_Releases/Statement_RE_Changes_to_Right_to_Farm_GAAMPs/?utm_source=Informz&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Michigan+Farm+Bureau

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lilly

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #111 on: May 16, 2014, 02:57:51 PM »



LANSING, MI -- A small beekeeper who collected almost 40,000 signatures on a petition calling for reversal of changes in Michigan's Right to Farm law said Thursday afternoon he was pleased by the Michigan Senate Agriculture Committee's meeting to hear from farmers and agriculture officials abut those changes.

After more than two hours of meetings scheduled around Senate sessions, though, the committee adjourned until a future date, as yet unannounced, when more people who wish to speak will get a turn.

Meanwhile, changes to the rules about where farm animals are allowed to be kept and still be in compliance with Right to Farm guidelines are in effect, said Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development spokesperson Jennifer Holton.

"Overall I felt the hearing went well," said online petition author George Thompson. "The Department of Agriculture made their case, followed by small farmers from rural to urban settings. Many small farmers made their case as to how the new modifications to  (provisions under the Right to Farm Act) will take away any protections as previously fulfilled under the Right to Farm Act."

Thompson said he provided the Senate Agriculture Committee with approximately 40,000 petition signatures and encouraged the committee to take a moment and review the thousands of comments from people that oppose and will be affected by the changes.

"I noted that all of the petitions given to the committee were all from Michigan residents, and that many more were not included, petitions were from England, Brazil, Canada and all over the country voicing their support to the small farmers of Michigan," Thompson said.

Thompson said his passions as a small beekeeper and a nurse prompted him to begin the petition, that its popularity "lies in the fact that people are beginning to realize the importance of diet and where their food comes from."

http://www.mlive.com/news/kalamazoo/index.ssf/2014/05/senate_agriculture_committee_h.html#incart_river_default
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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #112 on: May 21, 2014, 04:08:26 PM »

I see this is in Florida but it presents some of the same interesting questions that may eventually come out of this decision in Michigan.  He owns 10 acres and the pigs are ones people frequently keep inside their homes.  Yes, I've been in some of their homes and you don't even know the pigs are there... no smell whatsoever!!!

http://www.newssun.com/news/article_04b64395-4151-594d-8604-f5de72c3519a.html
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Professor H

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Re: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers
« Reply #113 on: May 21, 2014, 04:40:20 PM »

It's going to take lots of ingenuity...

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First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi
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