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arpydave

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #90 on: July 22, 2015, 09:14:02 AM »

Heh,heh, heh there Froot Fly, I mean French Fry. Thanks for the morning chuckle. Not a full out laff like I had yesterday from LW's post. His response added a third way of looking at it. And it didn't have to be directed towards anybody in particular.

It was, in short, clever. Something I would NEVER dare accuse you of. He used wit. In some circles it may have been called "rapier wit". Rapier, as in the fencing sword. Hence my reply of "touche'."

There Froot Fly, you've gotten your Introductory English Lit lesson for today. You can return to hanging out with the rest of the trolls under the bridge waiting for the 3 Billy Goats Gruff to walk on by so you can try to needle them into a verbal sparring match.

I added that reference to an elementary school tale(tail, whatever, haha) so it wasn't "beyond you".


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Professor H

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #91 on: July 23, 2015, 08:34:10 PM »

I read someplace that Central American countries are paying big bucks for old US farming equipment.....

We just gotta get it to TX.
Probably harder to get across the border going the other way  ;)
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Professor H

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #92 on: July 23, 2015, 08:46:17 PM »

Farmed with some old designed for horses - grain drill...  lost the book (someone scrapped the old refidge that had old farm manuals in it without telling me)

The book had the schematics for a wire driven planting system that criss crossed and filled in the field.   

Still have a hand start ( fly wheel) 2 cylinder Deere Model g  ... 
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BigRedDog

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #93 on: July 24, 2015, 08:36:10 AM »

Farmed with some old designed for horses - grain drill...  lost the book (someone scrapped the old refidge that had old farm manuals in it without telling me)

The book had the schematics for a wire driven planting system that criss crossed and filled in the field.   

Still have a hand start ( fly wheel) 2 cylinder Deere Model g  ...


I can't help you with the manual (I'll keep my eyes open though) but I did post a YouTube last November showing a corn planter using the 'check' planting cable system. 

http://monroetalks.com/forum/index.php?topic=30148.msg678202#msg678202


www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WTP_qYzvKZs


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BigRedDog

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #94 on: July 24, 2015, 08:53:20 AM »

Here's some more background on 'check' planting.

Interesting that the old 40-42" row spacing had to do with how wide the hips of the horses were!!!

Quote
When farmers used horses for cultivating, they had to plant rows as wide as their horses' hips – 40- to 42-inches. In fact the most common practice was to plant "cross-checked rows" with hills of corn planted equally both north and south and east and west. A wire was stretched across the field with knots every 40 or 42 inches. When the planter hit that knot, it would drop three or four seeds into the hill. Then, later in the season, the farmer could cultivate with horses in both directions.
As farmers bought row crop tractors with wheels that could be adjusted to fit narrower rows, agricultural researchers discovered that single corn plants more closely spaced in rows yielded more corn per acre. In addition, the mechanical corn pickers that were being introduced did better in rows. So, farmers began resetting their planters to drill rows of corn rather than dropping hills of corn.


More at:  http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe40s/machines_03.html

That's a great website for all kinds of historic farm info.
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BigRedDog

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #95 on: January 21, 2016, 06:14:16 PM »

This isn't really a question on the equipment but rather an idea on what were they putting down?

Saw a Terragator working in a field today.  It was one with a hopper and booms on it rather than a broadcast spreader.  Whatever it was looked dry and there was a white 'dust' blowing back up from the ground.  Couldn't really hear the engine on the machine running but could definitely hear the blower or turbine.

My first thought is they were putting down lime but usually you see piles of it dumped around the field and I didn't notice any piles anywhere.  It did look like they were near the end of the job so maybe they had used up the piles.

Just seems a little early to be doing anything like that yet :-\ :-\ :-\
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Professor H

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #96 on: January 22, 2016, 08:00:25 AM »

This isn't really a question on the equipment but rather an idea on what were they putting down?

Saw a Terragator working in a field today.  It was one with a hopper and booms on it rather than a broadcast spreader.  Whatever it was looked dry and there was a white 'dust' blowing back up from the ground.  Couldn't really hear the engine on the machine running but could definitely hear the blower or turbine.

My first thought is they were putting down lime but usually you see piles of it dumped around the field and I didn't notice any piles anywhere.  It did look like they were near the end of the job so maybe they had used up the piles.

Just seems a little early to be doing anything like that yet :-\ :-\ :-\
I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.
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Nancy Pelosi

BigRedDog

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #97 on: January 22, 2016, 08:18:42 AM »

I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.

This was down closer to here but probably the same machine.  I've seen them do potash too.  I just didn't see where they'd been dumping anything on the ground and I didn't see any kind of a 'tender' truck in the field either.  Lots of treerows in the field though and the machine was clear to the back (half a mile) so it would have been easy to miss anything but the Terragator!!!
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livewire

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #98 on: January 22, 2016, 09:12:45 AM »

Potash is often spread in winter, but I've never seen it dumped on the ground, and loaded with loaders into a spreader.  It's typically loaded with a tender truck.  Anything dumped on the ground is most likely ag lime, as Prof mentioned. 

But it might be potash.  Who knows?  Lol

Lime is usually whitish-grey in color, not brown.
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BigRedDog

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #99 on: January 22, 2016, 09:22:04 AM »

Potash is often spread in winter, but I've never seen it dumped on the ground, and loaded with loaders into a spreader.  It's typically loaded with a tender truck.  Anything dumped on the ground is most likely ag lime, as Prof mentioned. 

But it might be potash.  Who knows?  Lol

Lime is usually whitish-grey in color, not brown.

Sounds like it's one or the other then.  It just seemed a little early to see them spreading anything yet. 
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Frenchfry

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #100 on: January 24, 2016, 01:53:14 AM »

Sewage Sludge as Fertilizer: Safe?

Sewage sludge regularly tests positive for a host of heavy metals, flame retardants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals, phthalates, dioxins, and a host of other chemicals and organisms.  Of the thousands of contaminants that have been found in sludge, the U.S. government regulates exactly 10 of them (nine heavy metals and fecal coliform) if you want to spread the sludge on farm fields growing food crops.

When industry, hospitals, and households send their waste to wastewater treatment plants, the plants remove as many contaminants as possible from the water and then discharge the water as effluent.  The leftover solids are sludge.

Sewage sludge is typically treated to remove some–but not all–of the contaminants.  In recent decades, the sludge lobby (yes, there is one) has rebranded the treated sludge as “biosolids.”

Sludge that is applied to farmland–or even golf courses, home gardens, and, in the past, the White House lawn–comes in two flavors: Class A Biosolids and Class B Biosolids.  The only regulatory difference between the two is the level of fecal coliform, which is lower in Class A.

Class B Biosolids may be applied only to land where crops fed to animals are grown.  No restrictions apply to Class A Biosolids.   You as a home gardener can even buy these at your local gardening store and grow your own food in them.  Various cities get very creative at “branding” their sludge, so that gardeners can choose between “Milorganite” from Milwaukee, “Hou-Actinite” from Houston, or “GroCo” from Seattle.

Often, but not always, the various contaminants are found in sewage sludge at low levels. What happens to them once the sludge is applied to the soil is anyone’s guess.  Some chemicals bind to the soil; others do not.  Some chemicals leach into groundwater; others are insoluble in water.

Some chemicals are taken up by plants–perhaps into the roots only, or into leaves, or all the way into fruits.  Some chemicals break down into harmless components, others break down into dangerous components, and others don’t break down at all.

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2010/10/sewage-sludge-as-fertilizer-safe/#.VqR0ACorKUl

===

Huge Amounts Human Waste Being Sprayed On Farm Land
http://www.rense.com/general3/prs.htm

===

Human waste as fertilizer defended
http://blog.mlive.com/citpat/2008/08/human_waste_as_fertilizer_defe.html

===

Toilet to table: Human waste serves as cheap, effective fertilizer


http://www.twincities.com/ci_22367291/from-your-toilet-your-dining-table
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No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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SidecarFlip

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #101 on: January 24, 2016, 12:23:38 PM »

Another stupid azzed post by the resident azzhole.  You don't know shitte from shinola bud.  Only what you read on the net and can copy and paste....  and I broke my cardinal rule and opened your post to find it was your usual blather.
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Maverick

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #102 on: January 24, 2016, 10:29:02 PM »

When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav
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Frenchfry

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #103 on: January 25, 2016, 06:10:57 AM »

I went by that site - if it was on M-50...  they had two large trucks and end loaders and the trucks were dumping material so the endloaders could load it in the terragators. 

I would say from the brown sandy color of the material it was some form of fertilizer...   potash is often used.
When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav

Another stupid azzed post by the resident azzhole.  You don't know shitte from shinola bud.  Only what you read on the net and can copy and paste....  and I broke my cardinal rule and opened your post to find it was your usual blather.
Hmmm...brown...which is the color of the stuff I posted...and similar to the stuff Mav mentioned...

Sort of makes SidecarFlip the azzhole.
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

SidecarFlip

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Re: A farm equipment question?
« Reply #104 on: January 25, 2016, 10:00:52 AM »

When we were kids we used to go to the drying lagoons at the Monroe Treatment plant and shovel the dried crap into a trailer for our garden. It worked great.

Mav

I remember growing up in Cleveland and all the ethnic ladies on the lower west side fertilized their gardens the same way and sold the produce at the West Side Market on West 25th Street.  Never was an issue.  Recycling was alive and well back then too.
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