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Tiny

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #45 on: May 20, 2015, 12:31:26 PM »

Tiny, I'm so sorry you and your family have to go through this. :( All of you are in my thoughts and prayers. Watching a family member go through such pain and suffering is very hard. If you don't mind me asking, how old is your dog? And what breed is she?

This situation isn't a new thing - I've heard of animals who have bad reactions to the vaccines, but when we're talking about vaccines, people dont normally think of their pets, myself included.

I've watched what vaccines can do to babies who were functioning "normally" and reaching milestones on time. These babies are family, so it's safer for my children if they don't receive them, IMO. It's not just about the vaccines, but about how they interact with our bodies. Everyone is different. I personally don't want to take the chance. I'm not going to gamble with my children's lives. They are happy, healthy little kids, and I'd like to keep it that way.

When it comes to our dogs, they have all received their vaccines. I will admit, I never really thought about how the vaccines could affect our dogs. Reading your post has made me stop to think a little harder....

Again, I'm so sorry you have to go through this, but thank you for sharing.

Thanks ATG, our dog is 7 years old and she is a Jack Russel Terrier and she used to bounce of the walls as most JRT do. She seems to be recovering very slowly but all she does is lay around which is so unusual for her. She will just sit and stare at us like she's asking what's wrong with me and we can't even help her.

I'm glad my kids are all grown adults and we got their vaccines before we knew any better. If we would have gone through this before our kids were vaccinated it may have been a different story. As far as dogs and people the vaccines work the same way and can have the same problems. I've done a lot of research online since this started and had my eyes opened quite a bit. Even our vet says he would never vaccinate this dog again it's too risky. He says he can send a letter in so we don't have to get the rabies vaccine anymore.

We had a Rat Terrier before this dog and she lived to be 17 years old and we are hoping to get 10 more years with this one. Hell, that means she might out live me.
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AtypicalGirl

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #46 on: May 20, 2015, 08:24:49 PM »

Thanks ATG, our dog is 7 years old and she is a Jack Russel Terrier and she used to bounce of the walls as most JRT do. She seems to be recovering very slowly but all she does is lay around which is so unusual for her. She will just sit and stare at us like she's asking what's wrong with me and we can't even help her.

I'm glad my kids are all grown adults and we got their vaccines before we knew any better. If we would have gone through this before our kids were vaccinated it may have been a different story. As far as dogs and people the vaccines work the same way and can have the same problems. I've done a lot of research online since this started and had my eyes opened quite a bit. Even our vet says he would never vaccinate this dog again it's too risky. He says he can send a letter in so we don't have to get the rabies vaccine anymore.

We had a Rat Terrier before this dog and she lived to be 17 years old and we are hoping to get 10 more years with this one. Hell, that means she might out live me.

Awww! JRT's are so cute! :)

Our pets are just like babies - unable to really tell us if something is wrong, so it's harder for us to determine what to do for them. :(

I certainly hope you can get a lot more time with her, and hopefully she'll return to her old self again soon!
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arpydave

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #47 on: May 20, 2015, 09:39:00 PM »

Sorry, I won't take a stand for or against this.  As the parent of two healthy adult boys men I know that you can only do what you think is right, and then that you decided correctly.

However, that being said, I'd like to point something out.  My pals and I grew up at the tail end of the baby boom.  I have an older sister and brother.  We all drink water from a well, pumped through pipes that were at best copper, at the end of a plastic or rubber hose of unknown origin or composition.  Hell, I even siphoned gas through that hose, spit out most of the gas, then rinsed my mouth out of the same hose.

We all and our classmates were administered the routine childhood vaccinations.
To this day I haven't heard of anybody getting an illness caused by those shots.

I know they put out a new flu vaccine on a regular basis.  Perhaps the current formulations account for mutations and that's why we didn't have reactions.

I never had to get a polio shot; I don't even know if you could get one if you wanted it in America.

My late father was born too early for those routine childhood shots.  And he really suffered later on in life from shingles.

I won't tell you what you should do as a parent in this case.

Just be sure that your decision isn't based on politics or anecdotal evidences.  If you decide based purely on your child's best interest you'll be forgiven in the end if you're wrong.
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JN Coin-Bank

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #48 on: May 27, 2015, 10:19:55 PM »

   Although the mercury-poisoning inherent in present day "vaccines" is a given I've read recently how fetal ultrasound may have more to do with the ungodly numbers of "autistic" defectives than those by injection.  Of course "SIDS" is vaccine-related too, but for those who survive the attempts to kill them after they've been birthed ultrasounds in utero are quite another matter...
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livewire

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #49 on: May 29, 2015, 07:04:26 AM »

   Although the mercury-poisoning inherent in present day "vaccines" is a given I've read recently how fetal ultrasound may have more to do with the ungodly numbers of "autistic" defectives than those by injection.  Of course "SIDS" is vaccine-related too, but for those who survive the attempts to kill them after they've been birthed ultrasounds in utero are quite another matter...

Can you provide a link, please?
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Tiny

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #50 on: May 29, 2015, 12:17:00 PM »

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JN Coin-Bank

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #51 on: May 31, 2015, 09:54:15 AM »

Can you provide a link, please?


Searched online for the terms and this website Ultrasound-Autism popped up first.  This is the article I was originally referring to though, for what it's worth: Are Ultrasounds Causing Autism in Unborn Babies?
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The Fuzz

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #52 on: May 31, 2015, 10:05:10 AM »

I fact checked that when you posted......very interesting. 
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Frenchfry

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #53 on: June 02, 2015, 10:32:23 PM »

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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #54 on: June 02, 2015, 11:53:26 PM »

Ah yes!  That fountain of truth called the FDA...  The same one which has never tested GMOs for "safety" or anything else, and which fast-tracks any and all Franken-foods and BigPharm monstrosities and then tries to give them unqualified immunity for their vile products. The CDC is run by the same scumbags, too.



Quote
Since January of 2014, twice as many victims have won court decisions than the previous eight years combined. In these court decisions, a judge ruled the evidence showed vaccines “more likely than not” caused the plaintiff’s injuries.

Also on the rise is the number of vaccine injury cases the government has “conceded”: up 55% in a little over one year.

Yeah, looking to a government website for useful information is quite like quoting wikipedia for ... well ... any damn thing.
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JN Coin-Bank

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #55 on: June 03, 2015, 12:20:48 AM »

Here's an article that goes significantly further than just a few words on the issue, and includes photographs of the Varivax (chickenpox) vaccine insert (which all recipients are supposedly supposed to be supplied with before getting poked) complete with all the scientific proofs necessary to induce one to Just Say No.  It's a lengthy read but the manufacturer itself spells it out in no uncertain terms: the infallible science behind their product is non-existent.


Quote
The vaccine industry (along with the mainstream media) dishonestly positions vaccines as offering 100% protection with 0% risk. That's a lie./quote]

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Frenchfry

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #56 on: August 05, 2015, 11:06:30 AM »

There’s a surprisingly simple way to convince vaccine skeptics to reconsider

Here is a depressing fact about facts: In the face of beliefs, they often have little power. Fixing falsehoods — whether it's the closely held conviction of a birther or an anti-vaxxer — doesn't tend to work nearly as well as it seems it should.

But maybe we're going about the business of changing people's minds all wrong. A new study found that while it may be tempting to lecture someone that they're just wrong about vaccines and autism, it may be more powerful to simply tell and show them exactly what it's like when a child gets sick from a disease that could have been prevented.

The idea that vaccines are linked to autism risk was born in a study that has been retracted, called "utterly false" by the editor of the journal that published it and refuted many times over by other studies. Nevertheless, the idea continues to seed anxiety among parents. As the number of parents who refuse vaccines has increased, so too have the number of cases of measles. Measles, once declared "eliminated" in the U.S., with 60 cases per year, on average, between 2001 and 2010 has roared back, with 644 cases last year.

In a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, psychology researchers have found that a more effective way to persuade parents to change their attitudes about vaccinations is not to tell them they're wrong; It's to introduce new facts.

A group of 315 people were split into three groups after their baseline feelings about vaccinations were assessed. One group received a parent's description of what it was like to have a child with measles, warnings about the importance of vaccination, and photos of a child covered with measles and rubella rashes, or a young boy's face horribly swollen by mumps. Another group received information about the absence of a link between vaccines and autism. A third group read about an unrelated scientific topic.

"It was grounded in an old idea from economics, 'expected utility,' in which you weigh the positive and the negative," said Zach Horne, a graduate student in psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "What’s going on with anti-vaccination parents, we think, is because they haven’t seen kids with measles and mumps, those consequences aren’t that real to them. And the other consequence, the purported link between vaccination and autism, is."

Horne and colleagues found that trying to tear down the original belief with facts was ineffective. The people who received the latest scientific research about the absence of a link between autism and vaccines changed their attitudes about vaccines about as much as the group that just got some random, unrelated reading material. But those who reviewed the family stories, photos, and a public health warning felt more positive toward vaccines. Those changes were biggest in people that were skeptical of vaccines at the start.

That's a hopeful result, because a depressing study published in the journal Pediatrics last year found that none of these individual pieces of information alone worked against closely held beliefs. Giving parents correct information about vaccine risk, showing photos of children sick with preventable diseases, or providing information about what the diseases individually did not work — and even backfired. Those people who were most concerned about the safety of vaccines were less likely to vaccinate their children when given a dose of correct information.

Brendan Nyhan, an assistant professor of government at Dartmouth College, who did the Pediatrics study, said in an e-mail that the new work was encouraging, but that future research should focus on what the differences were between the two studies that led to such different results. Understanding the conflicting findings might help shape an even more effective education campaign for parents making health care decisions for their children.

This study alone isn't enough to change policy, but it does suggest that perhaps public health officials may not have been thinking enough about how to present information about disease risks and vaccine risks.

Horne said that he began doing Google searches for the images he used in the study to see how easily accessible the information was on the Web site of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was surprisingly hard to track down, he said, requiring multiple clicks — whereas lists of reasons to refuse vaccines popped up right away.

"I think there are immediate steps we could take; we could make it more easy to access this information and put it on a single page that would hopefully become a top hit when you're Googling," Horne said. "The thing with these parents is they are ultimately interested in the health of their child. They just have incorrect beliefs of where the risks are, and their bet is on the wrong horse."

Making disease risk information more prominent and accessible might be one way to make the correct information more persuasive.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonkblog/wp/2015/08/03/want-to-change-an-anti-vaxxers-fear-scare-them/
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com

Greg Chamberlain

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #57 on: August 05, 2015, 11:17:45 AM »

A new study found that while it may be tempting to lecture someone that they're just wrong about vaccines and autism, it may be more powerful to simply tell and show them exactly what it's like when a child gets sick from a disease that could have been prevented.

I feel the same way about GMOs. Instead of lecturing someone that they are wrong about GMOs killing everyone, it may be more powerful to simply tell and show them exactly what it's like when a population of people are malnourished or starve to death, which could have been prevented with GMO crops.

Of course, people like Frenchfry only play the science side when it benefits them politically so they'll only be keen on this tactic when supports their agenda.
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SidecarFlip

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #58 on: August 05, 2015, 11:42:35 PM »

I feel the same way about GMOs. Instead of lecturing someone that they are wrong about GMOs killing everyone, it may be more powerful to simply tell and show them exactly what it's like when a population of people are malnourished or starve to death, which could have been prevented with GMO crops.

Of course, people like Frenchfry only play the science side when it benefits them politically so they'll only be keen on this tactic when supports their agenda.

Not scientific, just plain old opinionless cut and paste crap.  His opinion less, not the opinion of the original article or author.
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Frenchfry

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Re: Anti-vaccination movement
« Reply #59 on: September 20, 2015, 11:19:59 PM »

Pediatricians have cut down on the number and proximity of vaccines because they recognize there have been "too many in too short a period of time." 
— Ben Carson on Wednesday, September 16th, 2015 in the CNN GOP presidential debate


http://www.politifact.com/florida/statements/2015/sep/17/ben-carson/ben-carson-says-pediatricians-realize-need-cut-dow/
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This is what I see when I visit:

"Sorry Frenchfry, you are banned from posting and sending personal messages on this forum.
This ban is not set to expire."

No emails, no warnings, no communication whatsoever...just that ban

May be what happened to the other libs as well.

I guess disabling the report to admin link only on the lib side was indicative of the slanted games they play.

Enjoy your spoon-fed Faux News type right-wing echo-chamber.

Edited to add:

This is the only way to answer some of the questions posed:

1) I did nothing to warrant the banishment, it's political.

2) It's the router that's blocked but considering all the nonsense right-wing games being played by those running the site...it's just not worth it to bypass the banishment block.

3) The moron stalkers from MT contemplating a visit will be considered a threat and can expect to have a bad day if they act upon those idiotic thoughts.

bumfunkegypt@live.com
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