MonroeTalks.com > Categories > Monroe History > History next door


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 9   Go Down

Author Topic: History next door  (Read 12220 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Professor H

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21786
Re: History next door
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2016, 09:27:39 AM »

Looks like they eventually replaced the Miami-Erie canal with I-75... 
Logged
First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2016, 09:33:38 AM »

Looks like they eventually replaced the Miami-Erie canal with I-75...

From Dayton on South it's very close.  I've tried to find the old canal route through Cincinnati but it's all been filled in.  I did just find a map that overlays the current streets so some day when I'm down there I can 'drive' that stretch too.


75 does pretty well mirror the path of our stretch of the 'old' Dixie Highway.  You can almost always find a stretch of 'Route 25' within a mile or two of any exit along 75...   from Monroe clear into Florida.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2016, 09:35:32 AM by BigRedDog »
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2016, 05:55:37 AM »

Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2016, 01:27:44 PM »

This is kind of from the other side of the state but the blue Ball jars are in a lot of cellars across Monroe County.  We have a lot of them either empty or ready to fill.

I never knew the 'blue' history but it is so interesting. 

http://www.awesomemitten.com/preserving-michigan-history/?utm_content=buffer2ffee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2016, 01:29:03 PM »

Some history of our neighbor just up US 23 from Monroe County:

http://www.awesomemitten.com/ann-arbor-history-college-town/?hvid=45crNy
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

Professor H

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21786
Re: History next door
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2016, 12:24:40 PM »

Interesting read - and the fact someone kept the Urn for 115 years
also that they didn't have any records of how many were on the train at the time as some were immigrants. 

========================================
Urn from 1901 train crash set to be buried in Adrian
BY DAVID PATCH
BLADE STAFF WRITER
ADRIAN — When a monument is dedicated later this year at the gravesite for victims of a 1901 train disaster, an urn containing bone fragments collected from the disaster scene also is to be buried there.

Ray Leonard, director of the Lenawee County Historical Museum, said Tuesday the collection of bone fragments from the fiery Nov. 27, 1901, collision of two Wabash Railroad trains was donated to the museum so long ago that details about who collected and donated them have been lost.

Though the fragments have occasionally been displayed, Mr. Leonard said, museum officials were never really sure what their long-term disposition should be. Now that the Oakwood Cemetery burial site for five coffins containing unidentified remains from the disaster has been located, he said, “it seemed like a no-brainer to us” that the bone fragments should go there.

The dedication ceremony is planned for Sept. 24, and the city of Adrian and the Italian consulate in Detroit issued a joint statement Tuesday identifying Sergio De Giusti, a native Italian sculptor now based in suburban Detroit, as the artist who will design a memorial monument for the burial site.


Mr. De Giusti “will be able to capture the spirit of this tragic event and transform it into a notable work of art,” Maria Luisa Lapresa, the Italian consul in Detroit, said in the statement while drawing a connection to an ongoing immigration crisis affecting Italy and other European nations.

“Understanding the Italian immigration past, filled with tragedies such as the one in Adrian, is a key for our comprehension of the current situation in the Mediterranean Sea, with the periodic shipwrecks involving African and Middle Eastern immigrants,” she said.

While the official death toll from the Thanksgiving Eve train wreck nearly 115 years ago was just 23, as many as 100 people — many unidentified Italian immigrants traveling to mining jobs in Colorado — were believed to have perished immediately or in an ensuing inferno after open lamps and stoves inside the train ignited wooden coaches’ wreckage.

Unidentified remains were placed in coffins and buried in an unmarked grave at Oakwood, the location of which became lost until Adrian city employees, at the urging of Mayor Jim Berryman, found records describing the spot.

Mayor Berryman said he personally apologized to the consul during a meeting early this month for how the immigrants’ remains were handled back in 1901.

“After 115 years, we felt it necessary to right what was done wrongly,” the mayor said in the joint statement with the consul.

Also attending the Feb. 5 meeting were Kyle Griffith, assistant superintendent of the Lenawee Intermediate School District and a local historian who pushed Mayor Berryman to try to locate the graves, and Lad Strayer, an Adrian city commissioner.

In a telephone interview Tuesday, Mr. De Giusti said he had not known about the train disaster before he was asked to develop an idea for the memorial, which he thinks is “a great idea.”

“I come from a country where memorials are very common,” the sculptor said, noting that he is already working on some small models — “some shapes out of wax” — that could lead to proposals for the monument.

Mr. De Giusti, who specializes in relief sculpture, has created many works of public art, including 29 bronze reliefs for the Labor Legacy Monument in Detroit’s Hart Plaza, a bronze sculpture of General Anthony Wayne for the Law School building at Wayne State University, and a bronze Christ figure for the processional cross used a Papal mass at the Pontiac Silverdome in 1988.

The sculptor said he plans to avoid stereotypical imagery such as eagles or angels in the monument, and “it’s not going to be a bunch of trains up in flames,” either. Ideally, he said, it will include “some sort of symbolism” of the harsh life the immigrants would likely have lived had they made it to the coal mines near Trinidad, Colo., their intended destination.


http://www.toledoblade.com/local/2016/02/25/Urn-from-1901-train-crash-set-to-be-buried-in-Adrian.html
Logged
First, it was not a strip bar, it was an erotic club. And second, what can I say? I'm a night owl.
Marion Berry

But we have to pass the bill so you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.
Nancy Pelosi

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2016, 08:00:50 PM »

The Detroit News had an article on this today too.  Not as detailed as the one from The Blade though. 

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/michigan/2016/02/25/train-wreck-victims/80944190/

Both used Adrian as a landmark for the crash which actually happened between the small burg of Sand Creek and the even smaller burg of Seneca.  Although there are no markers at the site of the crash you can literally drive to within 100 yards of the site and it is very well referenced by the bridge over Bear Creek.

Here's an older article which was originally in the Adrian Telegram.

http://www.michiganrailroads.com/MichRRs/News/2001/WreckOfWabash.htm

And one from January of this year.  I'd guess this article is where The Blade and The News picked up on the idea for their articles.

http://www.lenconnect.com/article/20160113/NEWS/160119713


This one is actually a geocaching article that gives the precise location. 

https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC1ZWK6_the-wreck-on-the-wabash-1901?guid=46f6f9a2-a6bb-4a4f-ae86-633c01b0f89c

It mentions how after the investigation one of the corrective actions taken was to change the name of the station at Seneca because it sounded too much like Sand Creek.  Apparently their cell phones back then weren't real clear ;) ;) ;)

Map to crash site from above article:



If you drive to the site this is pretty much what you will see...

don't go in the fall if they have corn planted because then all you'll see is corn!!!



There are several other photos on this website too.

Here's a link to the Google map if you want to 'explore' the location.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sand+Creek,+MI/@41.7979185,-84.1526948,889m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x883cf804ea91353f:0x2f684aea6c8a52fb!6m1!1e1
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2016, 09:15:51 AM »

Up the road (I-75) a bit and you're at the 2nd oldest home in Deeeetroit!!!

Sounds like some of the preservationists need to step in and do something with it!

http://www.freep.com/story/news/columnists/john-carlisle/2016/02/27/detroit-oldest-cabin-hidden-in-neighborhood/80866138/
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
See 1940s photos of 'Sea Jeeps' swimming through the Rouge River
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2016, 10:57:19 AM »

Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2016, 12:33:11 PM »

Back on Thursday, Feb the 25th there was a 'Picture From The Past' article on page 6B of the MonroeNews.

It was of a building in Samaria that has been both a commercial building and a home over the years.  It was noted that it was'

the first stone building in Samaria.  That was all very interesting in itself but what I noticed too was the 'billboard' ad on the side of the building (like they used to do on the barns out in the open country).  It was an ad for Kobacker's Furniture in Toledo.  Long one apparently but what was catchy was the their 'hook'...

"You can do better at"...   and then the name of the store.

I'm guessing this was all  a play on the current "You can do better in Toledo" promotion that has been running in Toledo area lately.  That promotion is a reflection on a hundred year old promotion so it might fit very well with the ad for the furniture store back then in quaint little Samaria. 


Here's some history on that ad campaign:

"You Will Do Better In Toledo" 100yr Anniversary Video for the City of Toledo
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #25 on: March 06, 2016, 02:03:42 PM »

Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2016, 09:29:53 PM »

Lots and lots of auto history right here in this area.  I'm sure plenty of Monroe people were involved over the years with the development and building of at least some of these trucks!!!

http://www.caranddriver.com/flipbook/an-illustrated-history-of-the-pickup-truck
Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".

Tiny

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5948
  • Aw...Nuts
Re: History next door
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2016, 04:03:18 PM »

Some not too distant past history of Irish Hills with some good pictures and interesting articles.
Too bad Cedar Point didn't build their amusement park there.
I remember everyone complaining about traffic and noise if they built it.
My parents had a cottage up there and we were up through there every weekend.


Peek Through Time: Gunslingers, bank robbers called Irish Hills home at Frontier City.

http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2015/10/peek_through_time_gunslingers.html#incart_related_stories

Peek Through Time: Irish Hills attractions beckoned tourists to see dinosaurs, wild west, Mother Goose

http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2013/05/peek_through_time_irish_hills.html
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 04:04:52 PM by Tiny »
Logged
Women should be obscene and not heard.

Ham Radio...the original social network.

FritzTheKat

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 10347
Re: History next door
« Reply #28 on: March 26, 2016, 04:45:51 PM »

Frontier City. Loved it. Ha ha...
Logged
I could be Schrodinger's Kat!

BigRedDog

  • Hero Talker
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 37578
  • 1969-1971
Re: History next door
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2016, 10:16:15 AM »

Historic photos from around Michigan.

http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/these_photos_of_michigan_durin.html#incart_river_home

I especially like this one:



It has always been a challenge on how to fight a wildfire without shovels and brooms and portable water tanks.  Some creative soul invented the 'sand thrower' as a possible tool.  I've heard some of the up north 'old timers' talk about the few that were ever in use by the DNR.

Michigan has another 'claim' to a popular wildfire tool that is still in use across much of the county today...

the Michigan wildfire plow on the back of a crawler and more recently on heavy duty four wheelers!



Logged
"It's always easy to come up with a solution to someone else's problems".
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 9   Go Up