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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2016, 10:19:31 AM »

I've driven by this barn up at Mio many times and never knew the 'story' behind it!



Quote
Coupland barn near Mio - built with Forest Service jack pine. New University of Michigan design. Photo circa 1940


This is from the above MLive article.
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2016, 09:47:30 AM »

At some point in their lives most Michigan residents make it 'up north' at least to the Straits of Mackinac.  I was fortunate to be able to spend a lot of time on both sides of the bridge from a very young age.

Here are a couple of good photo articles that bring back some early memories.

My Mom always 'hoped' we'd get to ride the Vacationland whenever we got to the straits.  It was definitely the Queen of the fleet.




Photo article on building the bridge:

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/05/30_photos_looking_back_at_mack.html#incart_river_home_pop

Photo article on the ferries before the bridge:

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/05/post_607.html#0


I remember the exchange my paternal grandparents had as they were riding the ferry just a few months before the bridge was ready to open.

My Grandmother said she was pretty sure the bridge would not be safe to drive on...

my Grandfather snapped right back that she better make up her mind pretty soon which side she was going to stay on :o :o :o

She finally relented and ended up crossing the bridge many, many times...

and it never did fall down ;) ;) ;)
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Professor H

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Re: History next door
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2016, 10:12:28 AM »

This is kind of from the other side of the state but the blue Ball jars are in a lot of cellars across Monroe County.  We have a lot of them either empty or ready to fill.

I never knew the 'blue' history but it is so interesting. 

http://www.awesomemitten.com/preserving-michigan-history/?utm_content=buffer2ffee&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer




I have a few of them - the larger/taller ones hold our spaghetti...   the lids appear to be tin with some early plastic inside

Was just at Greenfield Village and they explain how they make their "glass" different colors in the glass furnace building.   
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2016, 12:41:09 PM »

We had to go to Ann Arbor yesterday for my wife's appointment at the U of M medical...

Google maps was all orange when it was time to leave so we just took Platt road south out of town and down to the Kroger store in Milan and then on down to Cone Road where we jumped back on 23.  Along the east side of Platt road we saw a couple of old railroad bridge bulkheads over creeks or drains.  From what I can find this was an interurban line that doesn't appear to have ever been completed although stretches of it were in use.  It was intended to run from Toledo to Ann Arbor and then connect to other lines to the west of Ann Arbor.

Quote
The first inter-urban line was built between Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti and was drawn by a small steam engine in its earlier years. The line was electrified before 1900 and connected with Detroit in 1899 and Jackson in 1902. According to Pittsfield Township’s website, the railway also extended to the City of Milan via Platt Road.

The line was designed initially in part to connect the young men at the University of Michigan with the young women studying to be teachers at the Michigan Normal School (now Eastern Michigan University). The line connected the cities along Packard Road and joined up with the streetcar tracks on Main Street.


This references the concrete bulkheads we saw.

I'm betting the young men would have found a way to get to the young women even without the interurban ;) ;) ;)

Above from:  http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2014/07/uncovered_rail_tracks_offer_gl.html


Quote
There are still many signs of the right of way of the Toledo - Detroit railroad, in Petersburg there bridge abutments which were never used, the Petersburg Junction track is in place, in Dundee remains of trackage and grades in town that the Ann Arbor railroad had used, north of Milan along the east side of Platt road abutments for the ditches that never saw steel, there is still many signs of the grade between Toledo and Petersburg.


I wonder if this reference is actually for Platt road south of Milan...   the other article seems to say they did use it between Milan and A2.

Also a reference to a powerhouse on the River Raisin in Petersburg at Rose Road.  We were right there yesterday (went to SCF's to pick up seed potatoes) and didn't realize it until I was reading this article last night while looking for info on the Platt road bulkheads.

Above from:

http://www.trainweb.org/annarbor/AARRHistory/Toledo_Ann_Arbor-Jackson/RAGWEED-DT&I.html
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2016, 05:13:01 PM »

This link should take you to a Google Book preview for "Electric Trolleys of Washtenaw County".

https://books.google.com/books?id=3qhU-URwoywC&pg=PA95&lpg=PA95&dq=Interurban+petersburg+michigan+power+house&source=bl&ots=d5aixexnnc&sig=MM9N2dwn0hfpDoJ3qDUdb3fDrYY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjxh92y99LMAhWB3iwKHTJqBp0Q6AEINzAE#v=onepage&q=Interurban%20petersburg%20michigan%20power%20house&f=false

Scroll down just a half a page or so and you'll see a map that shows the routes (completed and proposed) from Toledo to Ann Arbor.
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Professor H

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Re: History next door
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2016, 10:03:29 PM »

At some point in their lives most Michigan residents make it 'up north' at least to the Straits of Mackinac.  I was fortunate to be able to spend a lot of time on both sides of the bridge from a very young age.

Here are a couple of good photo articles that bring back some early memories.

My Mom always 'hoped' we'd get to ride the Vacationland whenever we got to the straits.  It was definitely the Queen of the fleet.




Photo article on building the bridge:

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/05/30_photos_looking_back_at_mack.html#incart_river_home_pop

Photo article on the ferries before the bridge:

http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2016/05/post_607.html#0


I remember the exchange my paternal grandparents had as they were riding the ferry just a few months before the bridge was ready to open.

My Grandmother said she was pretty sure the bridge would not be safe to drive on...

my Grandfather snapped right back that she better make up her mind pretty soon which side she was going to stay on :o :o :o

She finally relented and ended up crossing the bridge many, many times...

and it never did fall down ;) ;) ;)


I seem to recall the place that held a lot of the information and "History" on the building of the bridge burned...   It was downtown Mackinac City and I recall going there several times in my youth.
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SidecarFlip

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Re: History next door
« Reply #36 on: May 11, 2016, 10:26:00 PM »

This link should take you to a Google Book preview for "Electric Trolleys of Washtenaw County".

https://books.google.com/books?id=3qhU-URwoywC&pg=PA95&lpg=PA95&dq=Interurban+petersburg+michigan+power+house&source=bl&ots=d5aixexnnc&sig=MM9N2dwn0hfpDoJ3qDUdb3fDrYY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjxh92y99LMAhWB3iwKHTJqBp0Q6AEINzAE#v=onepage&q=Interurban%20petersburg%20michigan%20power%20house&f=false

Scroll down just a half a page or so and you'll see a map that shows the routes (completed and proposed) from Toledo to Ann Arbor.

I completely forgot to tell you when you were here the other day that there were 2 guys with metal detectors in the field south of me (around the general location of the old rail line), looking for what I presume was artifacts.

You and I have to plot the old line and do some 'metal detecting' ourselves....

If you sight from where they were north towards 23, you can see the cut in the tree line where it went...
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2016, 08:12:33 AM »

I completely forgot to tell you when you were here the other day that there were 2 guys with metal detectors in the field south of me (around the general location of the old rail line), looking for what I presume was artifacts.

You and I have to plot the old line and do some 'metal detecting' ourselves....

If you sight from where they were north towards 23, you can see the cut in the tree line where it went...

That would be my guess that they were looking for rail stuff...    or just looking in general because I can't think of anything else that would be real popular right in that area.  Railroads tended to run in very straight lines and with the still remaining clues like the cut through the woods and a good GPS unit and map you can to within a few feet of where the old line ran.  Probably closer than the distance the maintenance crews would have thrown stuff when they were laying or tearing up track.

I did notice that the field closest to the drive for the well had already been worked but not the one closest to you.  Would be ideal to get in there the day they were going to work it up and look both before and after.  The rain may have washed the dirt off something visible and something 'new' may get uncovered when they do work it.

I wonder if any of the old rail spikes have ever impaled a tire out in the field...

wouldn't that be a surprise :o :o :o
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #38 on: June 04, 2016, 11:22:21 AM »

Some 'next door' history just up the Detroit River from here...

I knew quite a bit about Boblo Island but had never heard the history of Sugar Island.

http://www.nailhed.com/2014/11/sugar-island-black-boblo.html
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The Fuzz

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Re: History next door
« Reply #39 on: June 04, 2016, 11:40:16 AM »

Nothing to input, but I love this thread!
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Professor H

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Re: History next door
« Reply #40 on: June 04, 2016, 04:13:32 PM »

While it has the Custer flavor - many don't realize camp Custer is in the Battle Creek area... 
Interesting pic from 1918

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Nancy Pelosi

SidecarFlip

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Re: History next door
« Reply #41 on: June 05, 2016, 09:46:39 PM »

That would be my guess that they were looking for rail stuff...    or just looking in general because I can't think of anything else that would be real popular right in that area.  Railroads tended to run in very straight lines and with the still remaining clues like the cut through the woods and a good GPS unit and map you can to within a few feet of where the old line ran.  Probably closer than the distance the maintenance crews would have thrown stuff when they were laying or tearing up track.

I did notice that the field closest to the drive for the well had already been worked but not the one closest to you.  Would be ideal to get in there the day they were going to work it up and look both before and after.  The rain may have washed the dirt off something visible and something 'new' may get uncovered when they do work it.

I wonder if any of the old rail spikes have ever impaled a tire out in the field...

wouldn't that be a surprise :o :o :o

I know the fellow that owns the field pretty well.  I bet he'd let us nose around.  I also wonder just how close the well head is to the original tracks.
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SidecarFlip

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Re: History next door
« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2016, 09:48:07 PM »

While it has the Custer flavor - many don't realize camp Custer is in the Battle Creek area... 
Interesting pic from 1918




The MDNR allows hunting on Camp Custer btw.  Below M46 rules apply.
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BigRedDog

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Re: History next door
« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2016, 08:26:38 AM »

I know the fellow that owns the field pretty well.  I bet he'd let us nose around.  I also wonder just how close the well head is to the original tracks.

I've used Google mapper and drawn a 'measure' line between two fairly obvious still visible landmarks and as close as I can figure it's under 100 feet...   maybe as little as 20-30! 

Does the landowner know any of the history of the railroad?
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SidecarFlip

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Re: History next door
« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2016, 08:34:14 AM »

I've used Google mapper and drawn a 'measure' line between two fairly obvious still visible landmarks and as close as I can figure it's under 100 feet...   maybe as little as 20-30! 

Does the landowner know any of the history of the railroad?

Probably, he's 86 years old....and still farming.  Looks like maybe 55.  Must be the winters in Florida that does it....
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